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Author Topic: Gravity in the early universe  (Read 1371 times)

Offline Frederickspears

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Gravity in the early universe
« on: 22/01/2014 04:44:14 »
Hi everyone,

I'm not quite sure where to post my theoretical ideas so here is the first place I'm going to try :)

I was watching a Stephen hawking documentary and from what I gather he can't figure out how gravity worked in the early universe.

 Soooo this came to me:

In the early universe there was no gravity... Until things started spinning.

When the Big Bang happened everything shot outwards, the atoms that were
Involved began rotating from the force of the bang vs the empty space it was over taking. The rotation of the atoms was attracting other rotating atoms forcing them to merge, the spinning and merging eventually caused gravity to come into play as they got bigger and bigger.

This is just a thought, I'm not a scientist but it's all interesting to me and I have nowhere to post :)







 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Gravity in the early universe
« Reply #1 on: 24/01/2014 12:50:52 »
Are you thinking that a rotation (angular momentum) creates gravity? Or is it 'spin' you're thinking of?
 

Offline petm1

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Re: Gravity in the early universe
« Reply #2 on: 28/01/2014 05:39:15 »
Quote
When the Big Bang happened everything shot outwards,

I like thinking of big bang as a focal point of energy, from my present vantage point, and it is this dilating focal point that broke apart forming point particles.  The first moments must have been a very repulsive state with each point's motion being outward from a common past. These wormholes in time each existing in the same present moment  are the same point particles that make up our massive universe today.  I would think the inflating time between these focal points would look like space once this co-moving frame settled down to it relative state in my present and measured via photons.  Outward from a point is the direction energy flowed then and is the same direction we measure it flowing today much like the single direction of time.  Even if you think of the force of gravity as being attractive in time it is still repulsive for we only measure the interaction of masses.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Gravity in the early universe
« Reply #3 on: 09/02/2014 19:19:06 »
Hi everyone,

I'm not quite sure where to post my theoretical ideas so here is the first place I'm going to try :)

I was watching a Stephen hawking documentary and from what I gather he can't figure out how gravity worked in the early universe.

 Soooo this came to me:

In the early universe there was no gravity... Until things started spinning.

When the Big Bang happened everything shot outwards, the atoms that were
Involved began rotating from the force of the bang vs the empty space it was over taking. The rotation of the atoms was attracting other rotating atoms forcing them to merge, the spinning and merging eventually caused gravity to come into play as they got bigger and bigger.

This is just a thought, I'm not a scientist but it's all interesting to me and I have nowhere to post :)

It may be that rotational momentum is an inevitable consequence of gravitation following relativistic principles. This is why stars rotate and planets follow elliptical orbits. I don't think you can say gravity did not exist at the big bang as we don't have a testable theory of gravitation and so cannot say what the origin of the force actually is. I personally feel that nothing can ever be truly stationary. This means that angular momentum is built into the laws of physics. This can be inferred from the logic of Zeno's paradox and the quantum nature of the physical universe.

See the paradoxes of motion.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeno's_paradoxes#Paradoxes_of_motion
 

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Re: Gravity in the early universe
« Reply #3 on: 09/02/2014 19:19:06 »

 

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