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Author Topic: What would be the impact of a non-neutral Internet?  (Read 2503 times)

Offline cheryl j

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Heard a a segment on the Colbert Report about loss of net neutrality because of a US court ruling. One article I read said it wasn't really the courts fault because the internet's classification had been changed from telecommunications to an information service, and there was no other way the could have ruled.

What will be the likely effects of non-neutrality? Is it specific to the internet service provider? 

« Last Edit: 27/01/2014 09:18:45 by chris »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Net neutrality
« Reply #1 on: 26/01/2014 17:17:26 »
What I wonder is if the download limits could be changed.

Currently I have a max of about 150 kbps download speed, I think.  There are information providers that have "slow" vs "premium" services.  For the most part, they all come down at about the same rate to my computer.

I could imagine an internet provider unchoking the download speed for the premium services.  So, I might get 1 mbps using the premium service, and my 150 kbps for everything else.

The question is how far this will be extended.  Will content providers be required to not only pay their own ISP for access to the internet, but also pay all the downstream ISPs all the way to the end information consumer?

A small business may have issues competing with established businesses, although the small business would anticipate buying less bandwidth so it may be ok.  However, perhaps non-profit businesses on shoe-string budgets would find themselves taking a back seat to the for-profit enterprises.
« Last Edit: 26/01/2014 18:38:17 by CliffordK »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Net neutrality
« Reply #2 on: 26/01/2014 22:45:42 »
Quote
I have a max of about 150 kbps download speed

People on "Diallup" internet can get a download speed of up to about 50kbps.

Some older Mobile networks might only give you 150kbps.

To be called "Broadband" you would expect at least 2Mbps download speed, although an ADSL service over copper wires of 4km/3 miles could reduce you below 1 Mbps. Having corroded connections on your copper wire will also reduce the maximum speed.

Many newer technologies like Vectored VDSL2 offer download speeds up to 100Mbps, and Cable TV systems can be upgraded to match optical speeds of 1000 Mbps.

To see what speed you can reach, try: http://www.speedtest.net/
This site has fairly good worldwide coverage.
A bias built into the Internet Protocol is that you can access "close" sites more quickly than "distant" sites - a problem for those in Australia who wish to access sites in the US, or those in New Zealand who wish to access sites in the UK.

The discussion of Net Neutrality usually centers on whether content from all providers will arrive at the same maximum speed, rather than what that maximum speed is.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Net neutrality
« Reply #3 on: 27/01/2014 01:28:23 »
Oh,
Its probably bytes...  not bits.  That makes more sense....
So, depending on how many bits per byte are counted, that would come up between 1 Mbps and 1.5 Mbps. 

But, depending on the website, I frequently see rates of 30 to 50 Kbytes per second.

Still, it would be nice to download with the "premium" advertised rates of a couple of minutes for a 100 MB file.

I know Google makes a lot of money off of ads.  I am not sure how they prioritize searches, but I would hate to think that we would be reduced to searches being prioritized only by ad revenue.  Of course, if they get too aggressive, and people will choose other search engines (assuming the telecom companies allow access to the alternatives).

Or, perhaps telecom companies choosing to choke network content based on what some executives deem as desirable vs undesirable content.
« Last Edit: 27/01/2014 01:29:56 by CliffordK »
 

Offline cheryl j

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Re: What would be the impact of a non-neutral Internet?
« Reply #4 on: 27/01/2014 15:30:24 »
Quote from: CliffordK link=topic=50178.msg429677#msg429677


I know Google makes a lot of money off of ads.  I am not sure how they prioritize searches, but I would hate to think that we would be reduced to searches being prioritized only by ad revenue.  Of course, if they get too aggressive, and people will choose other search engines (assuming the telecom companies allow access to the alternatives).

Or, perhaps telecom companies choosing to choke network content based on what some executives deem as desirable vs undesirable content.

That's what sounds sinister about it. I can't imagine an ISP actually denying access to a popular site without losing customers. But I can imagine them wanting to get in on the action. 25 years ago I couldn't imagine the crazy fees in banking that are now standard and people just accept.

If some ISPs change what or how fast their customers can access certain things, does it affect the result of searches of people using a different ISP?

It's ironic that Netflix gets brought up all the time. People probably wouldn't have gone that direction if the movies on cable didn't suck or weren't pay-per-view in addition to their large monthly cable bill.

This was an interesting article. Almost everyone read the Verizon v FCC net neutrality verdict WRONG

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/01/18/why_almost_everyone_got_the_net_neutrality_verdict_wrong/
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: What would be the impact of a non-neutral Internet?
« Reply #5 on: 02/03/2014 22:45:17 »
I noticed a couple of websites that I had formerly been getting about 100+ KBps (bytes) are now giving me downloads in the range of 20 KBps, while other websites such as YouTube are still able to peg my service at around 150 KBps. 

I can't say for sure it isn't a problem with the sending website, but it is suspicious.
 

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Re: What would be the impact of a non-neutral Internet?
« Reply #5 on: 02/03/2014 22:45:17 »

 

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