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Author Topic: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)  (Read 1158 times)

Offline RayG

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Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« on: 30/01/2014 19:40:50 »
At what point in the solar system would the temperature be comparable to "room temperature" while in the sunshine? The "Goldilocks Zone" is always mentioned, but that would apply to a planet with a protective atmosphere allowing water in liquid form. Astronauts need to be protected from both the searing heat and frigid cold by using spacesuits. Leaving out the 'frigid cold' part, where could I lounge in just a pressure suit without protection from the heat?


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« Reply #1 on: 30/01/2014 20:42:41 »
Notes indicate that "The temperature on Mars may reach a high of about 70 degrees Fahrenheit (20 degrees Celsius) at noon, at the equator in the summer", so it would be fairly comfortable during the day.  Presumably a space ship around Mars would also get balmy temperatures. 

You would still have to worry about UV.

It is quite possible that the "Goldilocks zone" would be expanded somewhat for planets that were tidally locked to their parent sun.  So, if Mercury was tidally locked, there may be some twilight areas that would be comfortable.  Likewise, if Mars was tidally locked, then area facing the sun would be comfortable.

 

Offline RayG

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Re: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« Reply #2 on: 30/01/2014 21:02:16 »
Yes, aside from planets- I was speaking of space itself- NOT on a planet or moon or asteroid. How far from the sun would there be a place that is a "comfortable" temperature?
 

Offline RD

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Re: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« Reply #3 on: 30/01/2014 21:57:30 »
The distance will depend on how reflective and insulated your spacesuit is : incoming energy just has to match outgoing to maintain a constant temperature ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiative_equilibrium
« Last Edit: 30/01/2014 22:02:42 by RD »
 

Offline bizerl

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Re: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« Reply #4 on: 31/01/2014 03:17:09 »
My understanding was that the issue would be the temperature difference between direct sunlight and shade. If an astronaut was in free space, there may be a zone where the sun provides "room temperature" warmth on the side that's exposed, but the (almost?) vacuum of space would make the shaded side unbearably cold.
You could probably find an area that gave a good average temperature, but it would be like having one foot in a fire and the other in ice.
I think you'd still need some sort of temperature insulating layer to reduce the temperature difference to something more manageable.
 

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Re: Where is the "comfy" spot in space? (1st of 2)
« Reply #4 on: 31/01/2014 03:17:09 »

 

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