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Author Topic: Room temperature super conductivity  (Read 4133 times)

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Room temperature super conductivity
« on: 16/02/2014 05:55:45 »
The mighty super conductor!



I believe that when we discover room temperature superconductors. The world will be transformed forever. We will be flung Into a new age of amazing technology! I'm talking about super computers, levitating cars, perfect power transmission, megawatt batteries, magnetic levitation space craft and who knows what else.

This is a Brainstorming post, for anybody to join to discus how room temperature superconductors can possibly be made. For those who are new to the subject, take a minute to look at this instructional video into the basics of superconductors http://www.ted.com/talks/boaz_almog_levitates_a_superconductor.html

This stuff isn't exactly easy to understand for everybody, It's freaking quantum physics for crying out loud :)
so don't get discureged because it seems complicated.

As far as I know there are 2 different kinds of superconductor type 1 and type 2

-Type 1 superconductors are pure elements like tin for example. type 1 superconductivity takes place at 
  incredibly low temperatures like 4 degrees above absolute zero.

-type 2 superconductors are compounds of different materials put together in some special way that allows 
  for superconductivity to take place at much higher temperatures. But how it does this is largely unknown, 
  That's were things get complicated.

It is known that the molecular structure of type 2 superconductors flex when electrons flow through the material, It flexes to avoid the electrons and as a result the electrons "quantum entangle" and never actually touch the material this is what causes superconductivity at higher then normal temperatures. I have tried to understand how this "flexing" works but I don't really understand it. I wish it was simper but the explanation for superconductivity is really complex diving deep into quantum physics.

But everything I've read leads me to believe that The key to room temperature superconductivity lies in the shape of the lattice, the shape of the molecular structure.

Take a look at the these superconductors and there molecular structures.

This is the lattice of one of the most common superconductors.

here's another way of looking at it

If you compare the to images you can see how the material bonds together.

That's just one example of the lattice of a superconductor, the lattice can take many different forms and still work in basically the same way, one of the more weird examples of superconductivity is graphene a 2 dimensional material.



it too is a superconductor and it is apparently the closest thing to a room temperature superconductor that we have. To me looking at graphene's superconductivity makes it easier to visualize how it works because of how simple graphene's lattice is.

But the thing I'm trying to figure out is what does graphene share in common with other superconductors?

I'm stumped maybe you can help?  I was also wondering about how superconductors work in a vacuum and under pressure, if that has any effect on the superconductor.
« Last Edit: 16/02/2014 06:13:05 by ScientificSorcerer »


 

Offline Ian Scott ZL4NJ

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Re: Room temperature super conductivity
« Reply #1 on: 19/02/2014 00:52:36 »
Excellent post ScientificSorcerer!

There has been a lot of research into graphene lately, for example into making semi-conductors and it doesn't seem unlikely that it or family compositions might migrate into superconducting realms of intrigue 8D. However, is room temperature superconductivity of great overwhelming importance? To illustrate, we have been involved in space exploration sine the 60's and such engagements do not seem to be in decline. The recent NASA Mars rovers testify to our collective interest in space exploration (and commercial mining opportunity, space tourism, space television are just footsteps away). Perhaps an interest to also explore is material behavior at very low temperatures encountered in space. The recent "Jade Rabbit" rover from China might have benefited from additional knowledge in the ultra-cold domains of distant surfaces!  Certainly, this represents a sad scientific misfortune  :(

If we ever get into space travel beyond our solar system, then presumably super-conduction at temperatures near 0 Kelvin should suffice - perhaps extending tolerance to magnetic fields and the ability to support extremely high current densities might be worth some inquisitiveness? Although people often hope for some Dr Who Tardis or Star Trek "warp drive" engine to propel people beyond light-speed, we might be better directed to just accept the long haul and make inter-stellar people-carriers with dimensions measured in km to navigate the inky beyond. Even so, how would we combat our inclinations towards hostility, seen even in our simian cousins as reported by various nature scientists? Perhaps we would be better directed towards self modification - either through genetic modification or direct redesign of whatever we consider ourselves to be - or at least to some adequate approximation suitable for adventurer's we are unlikely to ever see again. Perhaps superconductive Daleks operating in near 0 K space would be appropriate and we back here on more comfortable surroundings can enjoy DVD screenings on whatever we may guess they get up to?

Anyway, I hope room temperature superconductors do drop by some day!
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Room temperature super conductivity
« Reply #2 on: 19/02/2014 03:27:10 »
I know what you mean, Space travel (in it's infancy) will probably take many years for single missions, even if we do get near light speed, traveling to the nearest stars will still take 40+years. which isn't that bad if you think about it considering how far off stars really are, But in-order to feel comfortable on long missions (and not go insane) then The space ship would have to be a luxury vessel. with at-least basic comforts and privacy.  Astronauts wouldn't be-able to handle the stress of being crammed in a can for so many years otherwise.

Try to imagine living with 4-6 people for 40+years being crammed in the space the size of a van. I don't think I could do it. I think I wouldn't make it, Going on a mission like that would require the patience of a Buddhist monk. In that sense your right, the ship would have to be a large vessel with the living space at least the size of a house with plenty of distractions like video-games for example. When considering missions like that you have to bear in mind the fragile nature of the ship's most important cargo (the human mind)

To tell the truth I Theorize that a ship like this would use a much different propulsion system then rocket ships of today, It would probably have some sort of quantum engine (or something) Take for example an alien space ship.



Now I think I can safely say, that is not a rocket ship Infact the so called "characteristics" of UFO flight Reminds me of superconductors, which ARE "quantum" and they levitates and it would probably be very useful for the circuitry and batteries of the ship. I'm willing to bet that UFOs magnetically levitate Via some strange properties of superconductors that we don't know about yet.

Superconductors are really the only "practical" use of quantum physics that we can get our hands on, so If you want to build a Quantum engine then superconductors are the place to start (I think)

I know for a fact that If room temperature superconductors were discovered then our own space ships would have them on board for one reason or another.

Think about this, If humans were to leave earth's magnetosphere then the astronauts would be exposed to high levels of radiation, 40 years of that would kill everyone on board we NEED a radiation shield chech out this video.


That so called "force field shied" is actually just a regular old magnet, In-order to get a powerful enough magnet to protect a ship then you would need a superconducting magnet, a superconductor with maxed out current locked in persistent mode. (in a toroid coil) The shield would also act like a powerful battery you could even drain power from the shield if you needed extra power.



If you wear steel, you would be attracted to the shield (it could pose a problem) But It might be useful, If you were to wear just a little bit of steel then you could use the magnetic field to generate artificial gravity on-board the ship! (if the super magnet was under the floor) that might be why aliens wear those shiny jump suits :)

so superconductors can be used for shields, artificial gravity, batteries, wires, levitation and even quantum computing. All the things you would expect a futuristic space ship to have ALL of it can be done with just superconductors. Heck I bet UFOs are completely made of superconductors
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Room temperature super conductivity
« Reply #3 on: 20/02/2014 02:51:22 »
I hope This video will get people interested in superconductors.

 

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Re: Room temperature super conductivity
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