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Author Topic: Does temperature affect gravity  (Read 1965 times)

Online jeffreyH

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Does temperature affect gravity
« on: 23/02/2014 02:55:54 »
About two years ago I came to the conclusion that temperature should affect gravity but could find no easy way to prove it. This is very interesting.

http://physicsessays.org/doi/abs/10.4006/1.3025579?journalCode=phes


 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #1 on: 23/02/2014 03:26:43 »
That former post has not been replicated but this is video interesting for different reasons.

http://www.ted.com/talks/boaz_almog_levitates_a_superconductor.html
 

Offline Phractality

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #2 on: 23/02/2014 20:56:56 »
I would expect added thermal energy to contribute to the total mass of the object, according to the familiar formula: E = mc2. This is probably not sufficient to be measured, though. The observed increase in weight at low temperature must be due to something other than gravity.
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #3 on: 23/02/2014 23:38:35 »
I would expect added thermal energy to contribute to the total mass of the object, according to the familiar formula: E = mc2. This is probably not sufficient to be measured, though. The observed increase in weight at low temperature must be due to something other than gravity.

The only way I can think that low temperature/high pressure situations can increase weight is due to the same effect we get under the compression of mass due to gravitational collapse. You would weigh an awful lot more at an event horizon. However these would be almost impossible to detect in laboratory conditions and why the results were not replicated elsewhere. The original findings could be due to equipment failure or some other factor affecting the results.

It may even have been an accidental early discovery of quantum locking.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #4 on: 24/02/2014 00:19:32 »
It's difficult to think of a means of weighing a cooling object in which the weighing apparatus is not influenced by  temperature changes. Do you have any experimental details? 
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #5 on: 24/02/2014 00:53:51 »
It's difficult to think of a means of weighing a cooling object in which the weighing apparatus is not influenced by  temperature changes. Do you have any experimental details?

I made a mistake earlier. What I thought were experiments trying to replicate the superconductor weight anomalies were actually about weigh decrease using quantum locked discs and levitation. I don't have access to Physics Essays so I have no idea about the experimental setup. I know what you mean though and that intrigued me. I will try to dig out more details and post them here.
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #6 on: 24/02/2014 01:06:47 »
There is a book here:

http://www.eurekaselect.com/100224/chapter/experimental-considerations-in-superconductor-gravity-experiment

Harald Reiss is one of the authors who was cited in the first link to physicsessays.org. In the abstract the exact difficulty in getting reliable results is discussed. He was at ABB who were doing superconductor research for the power industry.

www.google.co.uk/#q=ABB+Corporate+Research+superconductors
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #7 on: 24/02/2014 01:23:28 »
This is even weirder. Full description of experimental setup and results.

http://www.eracnet.org/workshop/doc/0108005.pdf

This sounds a lot like dark energy. They are using superconductors which have low temperature and high density along with a very large burst of electrical energy. This is on a smaller scale but is much like the conditions at the big bang. All the repulsion generated in one massive energy burst. Those precise conditions now only exist potentially within black holes. Could they be radiating repulsive waves?

The repulsion may only be exhibited at the poles of a rotating black hole due to the lower angular momentum and being directional would explain the relativistic jets. This would also explain why the repulsion does not eject galactic matter as it is not in the plain of rotation.

« Last Edit: 24/02/2014 01:50:55 by jeffreyH »
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #8 on: 24/02/2014 02:40:07 »
Well I am not sure if this is not pseudo science. I did find this.

http://www.ptep-online.com/index_files/2007/PP-10-13.PDF
 

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Re: Does temperature affect gravity
« Reply #8 on: 24/02/2014 02:40:07 »

 

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