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Author Topic: Arthritis - has there been any new developments?  (Read 4070 times)

Offline bigOz

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Arthritis - has there been any new developments?
« on: 11/08/2006 09:44:35 »
Apart from the post dated April 2004 (Thread: Latest Medical Discoveries), as a newcomer I have been unable to see anything about arthritis.

Has anyone heard of any new developments for the treatment or cure of arthritis? Please let me know if you have...


 

ROBERT

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Re: Arthritis - has there been any new developments?
« Reply #1 on: 11/08/2006 12:48:11 »
" An open-label study indicated that selective depletion of B cells with the use of rituximab led to sustained clinical improvements for patients with rheumatoid arthritis."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15201414
 

Offline Atomic-S

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Re: Arthritis - has there been any new developments?
« Reply #2 on: 18/08/2006 04:28:36 »
Well, I don't know if my observations will bear directly upon your question, but as a sufferer of ankylosing spondylitis, I discovered, parthy through the aid of a book written by a "quack", that my, at least,  condition was a direct result of some kind of an irritation of the digestive system (I guess that would qualify as a food allergy), which the chiropractor also suspected. I eventually discovered the basic eating problems leading to the problem, and have virtually eliminated the condition by paying attention to this. In my case, a lack of fats in the diet, especially fish oils, combined with the eating of foods having a high allergen potential especially wheat, is the main culprit, especially if constipation sets in. Further worsening the condition was irregular timing of meals, or eating food combinations leading to indigestion. So these things I watch closely.  

A book written many years ago by a physician made the clinical observation (although not subjected to accurately controlled studies) that female patients that had undergone a serious disruption of their menstrual function, as by hysterectomy, had a much higher  chance of developing rheumatoid arthritis than other patients. The same book also observed that in that physician's experience, the treatment of arthritis tended to vary significantly from patient to patient, so that each patient's case had to be dealt with individually, and an approach that worked for one might not work with another. (This remark was probably uttered in the context of more "wholistic" methods as opposed to modern prescription drugs.)

A health guru some years ago wrote that arthritis is not a disease, it is a symptom. It woujld appear that it might be a symptom having not one cause, but a variety of dissimilar causes, that vary from patient to patient, even when that cause can be determined, which greatly complicates dealing with it.

 

ROBERT

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Re: Arthritis - has there been any new developments?
« Reply #3 on: 18/08/2006 15:04:44 »
quote:
Originally posted by Atomic-S

Well, I don't know if my observations will bear directly upon your question, but as a sufferer of ankylosing spondylitis, I discovered, parthy through the aid of a book written by a "quack", that my, at least,  condition was a direct result of some kind of an irritation of the digestive system (I guess that would qualify as a food allergy), which the chiropractor also suspected.


" Ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease. III. Clinical characteristics and results of histocompatibility typing (HLA B27) in 50 patients with both ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease.

Dekker-Saeys BJ, Meuwissen SG, Van Den Berg-Loonen EM, De Haas WH, Meijers KA, Tytgat GN.

A study was made, in co-operation with several gastroenterology and rheumatology centres, of the clinical and genetic characteristics (HLA B27) of 50 patients suffering from both inflammatory bowel disease (38 Crohn's disease (CD), 12 ulcerated colitis (UC)) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), the latter diagnosis being established according to the New York criteria. 20 CD (52.6%) and 8 UC (66.7%) patients were HLA B27 positive. The presence of HLA B27 was studied in relation to clinical parameters, such as first occurrence of symptoms of AS or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a history of peripheral arthritis, iridocyclitis, and a positive history of AS or IBD. Our patients were found to have heterogeneous clinical features: on one side of the spectrum a group of cases was distingiushed with the typical characteristics of idiopathic AS, often being HLA B27 positive. On the other side a smaller group of HLA B27 negative patients was observed, with severe intestinal inflammatory pathology, lacking most of the typical clinical features of idiopathic AS ('secondary' form of AS). Finally, between these two extremes a group of patients was found with less pronounced clinical or genetic characteristics. These different clinical and histocompatibility patterns suggest a mixed aetiopathogenesis of AS in IBD patients. Such a 'syndrome' of AS might harbour both idiopathic AS and forms of AS 'secondary' to the intestinal inflammatory pathology. "
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=629602&dopt=Abstract

« Last Edit: 18/08/2006 15:57:22 by ROBERT »
 

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Re: Arthritis - has there been any new developments?
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