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Author Topic: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?  (Read 309062 times)

Offline iko

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Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« on: 12/08/2006 13:17:15 »

Hello everybody!
I'm Iko, cofactor and vitamin enthusiastic supporter
and well known cod liver oil maniac around here.
I opened this CLO topic to complement my previous
"Childhood leukemia" topic in Physiol.&Med.

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=4987.msg41687#msg41687

You are kindly invited to read and discuss both topics.
Enjoy

iko

Quote
It's about whether to strongly and officially recommend a nontoxic nutrient when data to prove its efficacy are still unconfirmed.
In the case of diseases of unknown cause and poor treatment results
...unsatisfactory results, or 'suboptimal' if you prefer.

It's Philosophy of Science and practical medicine altogether

ikod  [^]

 
   thanks to the >100000 viewers   (just unbelievable!)





I'll try to share with you some recent good & bad things about:

cod liver oil (CLO),
an obsolete remedy of the past for some,
number-one superfood for others.


Even if CLO contains large amounts of Vitamin A and D3, Omega-3 fatty acids, it MUST stay here in Complementary Medicine.

You do not need a doctor or a prescription to give a glass of orange juice or a teaspoon/caps of CLO to your kids every day.

Specific topics about Vit.A or D should go to Physiology and Medicine...but I'm sure that you won't mind if I attach some vitamin post here too.




If you asked this fool on the hill which is the most amazing report about Cod Liver Oil (CLO) in the recent past, he would not have any doubt:

Maternal supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy
and lactation augments children's IQ at 4 years of age.


Helland IB, Smith L, Saarem K, Saugstad OD, Drevon CA.
Pediatrics. 2003 Jan;111(1):e39-44.

To read the abstract click down here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=12509593&query_hl=6&itool=pubmed_docsum

Pediatrics 2003, Norwegian research, scientifically sound:

Children more clever at 4yrs
with one spoon of CLO per day
during pregnancy and lactation!



Fig. 1. Scores on the K-ABC for children whose mothers had taken cod liver oil (n = 48) or corn oil (n = 36) during pregnancy and lactation. Values for the different subtests are shown. MPCOMP, Mental Processing Composite; SEQPROC, Sequential Processing; SIMPROC, Simultaneous Processing; NONVERB, Nonverbal Abilities.




Neat eh?
 
...when I've got this information my two sons had already grown up!
Some people could still make it with their children.
A good point to start a mini-review and/or discussion.


iko




"Il sole dona la vita, il sole se la riprende" M.U. Dianzani, 1975.
« Last Edit: 26/07/2010 16:07:50 by iko »


 

another_someone

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #1 on: 12/08/2006 17:53:41 »
Well, I was fed cod liver oil as a child – read into that what you will.



George
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #2 on: 12/08/2006 19:03:57 »
You see, unfortunately I was not...and my brain is just a mess.

I knew from a miracle-cure story in my family (grandfather) that it had to be a great thing.

Quote
Click above if you want to read my grandfather's story...

Stupid of me, I never gave it to my children (before 1999)
because "I thought" it might be contaminated and all that blablabla...
You can easily check it out these days:
there is no major problem of contamination
(not more than fruit and salad)
but just good golden stuff.

quote:

We may be paying a very high price for our rejection of parental wisdom to take our cod liver oil.

Krispin Sullivan 2002



      

Fish oil over time

1890s   Cod-liver oil is used as a home remedy to treat rickets, rheumatism, tuberculosis and other ailments.

1930s   Fish oil is used as a key ingredient in shortening.

1950s   Dale Alexander publishes a book touting cod-liver oil as an elixir for arthritis, earning him the nickname the "codfather."

1970s   Researchers find that Greenland's Inuit have low levels of heart disease, likely because of diets rich in fish.
               It is one of the first associations between omega-3 fatty acids and good health.

1990s   As studies increase on the benefits of omega-3s, more consumers start taking fish oil pills made from a variety of fish.

2000   Aquaculture demands more and more fish oil.
              Today Fish oil begins to be injected into bread and tamales, among other foods.
 



ikod
« Last Edit: 23/09/2007 10:18:00 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #3 on: 19/08/2006 22:58:54 »
Nothing new under the sun...

...In northern latitudes (Iowa), sunshine is too diminished in the winter for infants to generate vitamin D on their own. At the begining of the last century, it was standard practice to give breastfed infants a teaspoon of cod liver oil which averages 440 IU of vitamin D3 per day.
When the use of formula became popular, enough vitamin D was added to the formula to prevent deficiency.
Then since the 1970s women returned to breast feeding, but they never resumed the practice of giving their babies any dietary supplement...

Brestfed infants living in temperate climates often deficient in vitamin D
Pediatrics 2006;118:603-610.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/542395?src=mp
« Last Edit: 19/08/2006 23:11:03 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #4 on: 20/08/2006 23:33:45 »
You have to look for properly controlled, high quality CLO...

...Values of PCBs and DDTs, although below the range of 1 to 4 pg of TEQ per kg of body weight per day set by the World Health Organization, emphasize the need for strict and continuous monitoring of fish oil contamination to reduce, as much as possible, the risks to human health.
Proper Quality Controls are routinely performed by the majority of tha COD producers.

Polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, and pesticide organochlorine residues in cod-liver oil dietary supplements.


Storelli MM, Storelli A, Marcotrigiano GO.
Pharmacological-Biological Department, Chemistry and Biochemistry Section, Veterinary Medicine Faculty, University of Bari, Strada Prov le per Casamassima Km 3, 70010 Valenzano (Ba), Italy.

Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (alpha, beta, gamma), and chlorinated pesticides (DDTs) in cod-liver oil used as a dietary supplement were determined. Total PCB and DDT concentrations varied from 25 to 201 ng g(-1) lipid weight basis and from 25 to 133 ng g(-1) lipid weight basis, respectively. Hexachlorobenzene contributed very little to the overall contaminant burden of dietary supplement oils, whereas hexachlorocyclohexane isomers were below the instrumental detection limits in all samples. The daily intake of PCBs and DDTs derived by the consumption of cod-liver oil at manufacturer-recommended doses varied from 0.004 to 2.01 microg/day and from 0.004 to 1.24 microg/day, respectively. Relative to some dioxin-like PCB congeners (mono-ortho PCB 105, 118, and 156; non-ortho PCB 77, 126, and 169), the intakes calculated varied from less than 0.001 to 0.74 pg of toxic equivalency values (TEQ) per kg of body weight per day. These values, although below the range of 1 to 4 pg of TEQ per kg of body weight per day set by the World Health Organization, emphasize the need for strict and continuous monitoring of fish oil contamination to reduce, as much as possible, the risks to human health.

J Food Prot. 2004 Aug;67(8):1787-91.


« Last Edit: 07/10/2007 15:08:04 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #5 on: 26/08/2006 13:31:23 »
Quote
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored

Aldous Huxley





Quote

...Vitamin D was used to treat a variety of skin diseases including psoriasis in the 1930s. However, it was not until the mid-1980s that the terapeutic potential of vitamin D in skin diseases reemerged.
A dramatic improvement was seen in the psoriatic lesions in a patient receiving oral 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 to treat severe osteoporosis (171).



...from a nice and thick, recent review by Adriana S. Dusso and coll.:

Vitamin D
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15951480&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

Comment:
Psoriasis is the most common disease of the skin.
Incidence of psoriasis is about 2% of the population in USA...
http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/1999/09_99/mohla.htm

Now calculate how many patients approximately could have had some benefit from cod liver oil administration in those fifty years (1935-85)...

iko



« Last Edit: 05/07/2008 18:28:36 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #6 on: 27/08/2006 10:56:22 »
Dr. Michael Holick


 



Vitamin D deficiency Epidemics in the new Millennium.

...Adams: It seems like vitamin D is misnamed. It's not really a vitamin in the classic sense, is it?

Dr. Michael Holick: It's a good point, and the reason for it is as follows. It was recognized in the mid-1800s that if you gave cod liver oil to children who had rickets, it could cure rickets. And if you gave cod liver oil to children without rickets, it prevented them from getting rickets. So people thought that there was a vitamin present that was necessary for bone health. And that vitamin was finally identified by taking cod liver oil and boiling it, because once you boil cod liver oil, the vitamin A in it gets destroyed. Originally they thought it was vitamin A that was responsible for bone health, but when they boiled it and destroyed the vitamin A, the anti-ricketic activity, that is the bone health activity, was still present in the cod liver oil. And so it was named vitamin D, because there had already been identified a vitamin A, a B and a C, so the next in line was vitamin D.


...more in:
Vitamin D deficiency is widespread among U.S. population, expectant mothers are deficient and giving birth to deficient infants.

January 1st 2005
http://www.newstarget.com/z003205.html

ikod
« Last Edit: 26/07/2010 16:25:39 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #7 on: 29/08/2006 13:24:48 »
Should Vitamin D be Given to Cancer Patients?
 
The answer is easy when you ask the question another way. Should cancer patients be treated for their vitamin D deficiency? Most people, including those serving on malpractice juries, might think so.
But which vitamin D is the best? Is it the kind of vitamin D one can get from exposure to the sun or fish oil? Or do the scientists who are trying to create more profitable and expensive vitamin D treatment for cancer have the right idea?
The upcoming National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health conference on cancer and vitamin D Nov. 17-19 2004 in Bethesda, Md., (free to the public) promises to be an interesting match with two very different groups of scientists slugging it out.
Why? Vitamin D will greatly increase tissue levels of calcitriol which has remarkable anticancer properties. Moreover, a lot of epidemiological evidence suggests that plain old vitamin D helps prevent normal cells from turning cancerous. Because cancer is a dynamic process, it makes sense to do everything one can do to prevent healthy cells from turning into malignant ones, especially in cancer patients.

from: Medical News Today October 11, 2004
http://www.alternativecancerdiet.com/articles/2004/10/index.html

not so much "alternative" so far, I must say...

iko
« Last Edit: 17/10/2006 22:36:23 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #8 on: 04/09/2006 22:24:20 »
...for a change, here is one of the few negative news about 'cod'.

Fish tale  From cod liver to fatty acids, fish oil has long been considered healthy, but some say the current versions may do more harm than good.

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/health_science/articles/2004/04/20/fish_tale/

Note:
fish liver oils contain vit.A+Vit.D3+omega-3 fatty acids.
fish oils contain omega-3 fatty acids mainly.

Vit.A&Vit.D3 are fat-soluble and do accumulate in the body: doses higher than reccomended may lead to toxicity.
 
iko

 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #9 on: 09/09/2006 15:30:04 »
Effect of daily cod liver oil and a multivitamin-mineral supplement with selenium on upper respiratory tract pediatric visits by young, inner-city, Latino children: randomized pediatric sites.

...the effect of daily supplementation with lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a children's multivitamin-mineral supplement containing selenium on the number of pediatric visits by young, inner-city, Latino children from late autumn of 2002 through early spring of 2003. Two private pediatric offices with similar demographics, located 1.1 miles apart in upper Manhattan, New York City, were randomized to a supplementation site and a medical records control site. Ninety-four children (47 at each site), 6 months to 5 years of age, were enrolled.
...
The supplements were well tolerated; per parental report, 70% of children completed the 5- to 6-month course of cod liver oil. Use of these nutritional supplements was acceptable to the inner-city Latino families and their young children, and was associated with a decrease in upper respiratory tract pediatric visits over time; this approach therefore deserves further research and attention.

Linday LA, Shindledecker RD, Tapia-Mendoza J, Dolitsky JN.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2004 Nov;113(11):891-901.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15562899&query_hl=2&itool=pubmed_DocSum

This after just 5-6 months...can you imagine after one or more years?

Do something 'cod' for your kid!
iko
« Last Edit: 10/09/2006 09:29:59 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #10 on: 10/09/2006 16:34:13 »
So, Dr Iko,

Is it your considered opinion that CLO is a good thing to take for the young and old ?.........Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages ?

Thank you Dr Iko :)

Men are the same as women, just inside out !
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #11 on: 10/09/2006 22:24:16 »
Wow! deep breath...one question for me.
I'll quit asking myself questions for a while.

Please call me iko or Enrico if you prefer. I'm here as a parent more than a doc. I was really scared in 1999, I kept this cod-story for myself and used it as a placebo (not to go mad).
Now I feel much better and it's time to send my message in a bottle for other parents like me.
Thanks to this forum: in August I was temporarily alone at home and I found the enthusiasm and the energy (and peace!) to put all these little bits together.
 

Quote
"Is it your considered opinion that CLO is a good thing to take for the young and old ?.........Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages ?

neilep


Of course it is a good point, and I can offer my opinion: I'm not sure about that!
Firstly, there wouldn't be enough for everybody, that's for sure (poor cods!) and so we have to decide a priority list.

I would give it to leukemic children right away, as I tried to explain in the childhood leukemia topic/novel, that should be renamed: engineers&doctors facing statistical analysis...did you read it?

It is a case of neglected evidence that could have been used since 1988 for our patients' sake.

If anybody had wanted confirmed evidence of something like that in a controlled study...
It would have been like dividing airplanes into two groups (red-fluid versus blue-fluid), then
counting the accidents in the two sets until further significant evidence had come out.

Can anybody imagine a placebo group versus cod liver oil in this setting (1/3 die in 5-10yrs)?

Neither that has been done...just nothing.

So I buy it at the supermarket for my younger son (every evening: R. did you take your 'cod'?) and we (wife, older son and myself) take it from time to time as a nutritional supplement. I prefer it as a source of vitamin D because is more historically-proven then any other stuff and combined with other good things like vitamin A and omega-3.
Sometimes it takes years to prove that the natural recipe is better. Do you remember the little story about vitamin A and cancer incidence?   I accept all the variables included...fishes and their livers may be different and also vitamin content varies in seasons.  Good enough for me.

In the old days CLO had been a remedy for rickets (vitamin D) and a nutritional support (anti-infectious vitamin A) for growing children and it probably was a miracle-cure for undernourished infants.
Today's kids are frequently overnourished, but they might be malnourished paradoxically, eating junk food and keeping away from the sun.

In Northern Europe -where sunshine is a rarity- they used to take cod liver oil in the months with the 'r': from September to April.

Scientific evidence for CLO is lacking: no randomized controlled study, few clinical trials. What I am collecting here in this topic is probably most of the recent "evidence".  Old studies are practically rejected by the scientific community because they didn't follow the current standards of clinical investigation.

CLO is out of western medicine now. About 500 citations in PubMed database: almost nothing, in practical terms.
The separate components of cod liver oil will still be used in the near future, but they do not cost enough to support proper clinical studies: vitamin D analogues will probably make it, but it will take years and randomized clinical trials.  Trial & error, again.

In my opinion, it should be used just like in the old days.
Many white-haired pediatricians still use it around here.
CLO has certainly been a wonderful placebo for me.


...in 2006 I joined the Wisdom In Medicine Panel (WIMP!) as a junior member. I have been in the Association of Parents Against  Leukemia since '99. We are still looking for the Common Sense Committee. It seems a bit difficult to find one though. Then we'll arrange a meeting to revise all these data and take a decision...
Unfortunately, it sounds like a dream right now.    

iko




« Last Edit: 28/06/2008 18:50:26 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #12 on: 10/09/2006 23:47:29 »
This is wonderful stuff IKO.

THANK YOU

We take it too....based on what you have said we'll continue with it also.

Men are the same as women, just inside out !
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #13 on: 11/09/2006 15:59:10 »
Hi Iko.  Is CLO the same as fish oil.  I have a bottle of DHA plus Lipase.  It has 500 mg of fish oil concentrate and 250 mg of Ogega3 DHA.  My mother in law gave this to me for my son. He was diagnosed with ADHD some time ago and she thought this would help. What's your opinion?  

Carolyn
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #14 on: 11/09/2006 17:54:55 »
Hi Carolyn! Thanks for calling...
Cod liver oil is not exactly like fish oil
 
quote:
Note:
fish liver oils contain vit.A+Vit.D3+omega-3 fatty acids.
fish oils contain omega-3 fatty acids mainly.

Vit.A&Vit.D3 are fat-soluble and do accumulate in the body: doses higher than reccomended may lead to toxicity.

iko


So when you give fish oil you are giving omega-3 fatty acids mainly.
Omega-3 may have amazing effects on the human brain and they are currently being tested in patients with bipolar disorder (a type of psychotic depression): there are positive and negative reports, as usual. They just started few years ago...it is a promising field.
There is an interesting book about this by a pharmacology professor, Andrew L. Stoll:
http://www.amazon.com/Omega-3-Connection-Groundbreaking-Anti-depression-Program/dp/0684871386
In proper doses you may be sure to give good nutrients (they come from the sea plankton!) and no toxicity. Even if they don't work, your kid will be safe and well nourished.
I don't know ADHD enough to reccomend anything, but speaking of nutritional supplement and reminding the paper cited at the beginning of this topic, I would suggest to alternate fish oil with CLO.
Vitamin D has also positive effects on the brain.
Check carefully expiring date and storage reccomended conditions: these oils may go rancid quick.
 
quote:
Control of the nervous system
Vitamin D3 actions in the nervous system include induction of Vitamin D Receptor content (VDR is expressed in the brain and on several regions of the central and peripheral nervous system), the conductance velocity of motor neurons, and the synthesis of neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factors and neurotrophyns, that prevent the loss of injured neurons. Vit.D3 also enhances the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, a potential candidate for treatment of Parkinson's disease.
In addition to increased nerve growth factor, combined treatment with Vit.D3 and 17beta-estradiol in rats elicits neuroprotective effects after focal cortical ischemia induced through the photothrombosis model.
Vit.D3 influences critical components of orderly brain development. In the embrionic rat brain, the VDR increases steadly from day 15 to day 23, and Vit.D3 induces the expression of nerve growth factor and stimulates neurite outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal explants and primary cultures.  Low prenatal Vitamin D in utero leads to increased brain size, brain shape, enlarged ventricles, and reduced expression of nerve growth factor in the neonatal rat.
The association of vit.D deficiency and abnormal brain development makes Vitamin D an attractive candidate for tretment of schizophrenia, a disorder resulting from gene-environment interactions that disrupt brain development.
Also, transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency in rats induces hyperlocomotion in adulthood with sever motor abnormalities.


simplified by me from a nice and thick recent review by Adriana S. Dusso and coll.:
Vitamin D
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15951480&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

Shortly, there is increasing experimental evidence that vitamin D is just good for the brain.
No negative effects are reported.
Take care
iko

Post Scriptum:
I just found a positive report about ADHD and fish oil. You probably started from this one...let me know.  There are so many references to get lost between papers and scientific reports.
It's in another Forum! What a fantastic gigantic basket this Google is...

http://www.feelgoodforum.com/about1564.html
« Last Edit: 14/10/2006 22:31:09 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #15 on: 12/09/2006 16:46:15 »
A jump backwards into the recent past, for a change:

Cod liver oil and industrial absenteeism

quote:

...In the United States, a major concern among industry in the 1930s was the loss of productivity due to illness in the labor force of 36 million. It was estimated that 250 million working days were lost per year of illness.
Arthur Holmes, medical advisor to the E.L.Patch Compant in Boston, calculated that cold and respiratory diseases cost American industries a waste of wages of exactly $494,836,363.68 per year (Holmes et al. 1936).  About half of the industrial absenteeism was due to respiratory illness.  Holmes and colleagues conducted a trial of cod-liver oil among industrial workers in a factory in the American midwest.  Over 300 workers received daily cod-liver oil or no treatment, and the trial included both clerical workers and light- and heavy-machine operators. The outcome of the study was hours of industrial absenteeism due to respiratory illness.  Members in the treatment group had 40% lower absenteeism than the control group (Holmes et al. 1932).
A larger trial involving 1800 workers and another with over 3000 workers were reported (Holmes et al. 1936), and these studies suggested that cod-liver oil therapy reduced industrial absenteeism by two-thirds.
Thus cod-liver oil, which was inexpensive, was considered to have tremendous value in saving millions of dollars in lost working days and lost productivity to American industry.
...


From:   History of nutrition
Richard D. Semba
Vitamin A as "Anti-Infective" Therapy, 1920-1940.
J.Nutr. 129:783-791, 1999.


Enjoy your free full-text reading here:
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/129/4/783

iko


http://www.herbsandheirlooms.com/vintagemedicine/patchol2.JPG
« Last Edit: 26/07/2010 16:23:44 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #16 on: 13/09/2006 16:20:41 »
Bone and muscle pain in vitamin D deficiency





Short summary from:
G de Torrenté de la Jara, A Pécoud, and B Favrat

Female asylum seekers  with musculoskeletal pain:
 the importance of diagnosis and treatment of hypovitaminosis D.



Hypovitaminosis D is well known in different populations, but may be underdiagnosed in certain populations. We aim to determine the first diagnosis considered, the duration and resolution of symptoms, and the predictors of response to treatment in female asylum seekers suffering from hypovitaminosis D.
In a network comprising an academic primary care centre and nurse practitioners, in 33 female asylum seekers with complaints compatible with osteomalacia, hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-(OH) vitamin D <21 nmol/l) was diagnosed.
The patients received either two doses of 300,000 IU intramuscular cholecalciferol as well as 800 IU of cholecalciferol with 1000 mg of calcium orally, or the oral treatment only.
We recorded the first diagnosis made by the physicians before the correct diagnosis of hypovitaminosis D, the duration of symptoms before diagnosis, the responders and non-responders to treatment, the duration of symptoms after treatment, and the number of medical visits and analgesic drugs prescribed 6 months before and 6 months after diagnosis.
Prior to the discovery of hypovitaminosis D, diagnoses related to somatisation were evoked in 30 patients (90.9%). The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.53 years. Twenty-two patients (66.7%) responded completely to treatment; the remaining patients were considered to be non-responders.
After treatment was initiated, the responders' symptoms disappeared completely after 2.84 months. The mean number of emergency medical visits fell from 0.88 six months before diagnosis to 0.39 after. The mean number of analgesic drugs that were prescribed also decreased from 1.67 to 0.85.
Conclusion
Hypovitaminosis D in female asylum seekers may remain undiagnosed, with a prolonged duration of chronic symptoms.
The potential pitfall is a diagnosis of somatisation.
Treatment leads to a rapid resolution of symptoms, a reduction in the use of medical services, and the prescription of analgesic drugs in this vulnerable population.

BMC Fam Pract. 2006 Jan 23;7:4.


Comment:

Cod liver oil instead of vitamin D3 would have sorted the same effect.

It is impressive how much time it takes (1.4-2.8 months) to reach complete resolution of the symptoms: not even all patient responded, but all of them where vitamin D deficient. One patient required seven months of treatment to be free from symptoms.

Intriguing questions:

- How many times is a vitamin D deficiency suspected in an adult complaining bone and muscle pain?

- How many doctors would refer their patients' improvement to a drug injected or prescribed several months before?

- How many patients would take a drug for such a long time in spite of lack of results?

ikod
« Last Edit: 26/07/2010 16:36:04 by iko »
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #17 on: 13/09/2006 18:31:48 »
Iko - Thanks for the email and the info.  Right now I have a bottle of the fish oil on hand, but getting him to take it is proving to be a difficult task. I'm not sure whether to continue with the fish oil and start the CLO, or to combine the two.  I'll have to do more research I guess.

Carolyn
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #18 on: 13/09/2006 21:04:29 »
Carolyn,
I don't know how old your kid is, but it is always a bit difficult to start with these things...later on it becomes a routine, and everything goes fine.  I am afraid you'll have to tell stories about plankton and beautiful smelly fishes like Nemo swimming in the sea under the sun, collecting and making wonderful vitamins for him.
And you have to take some caps yourself...and tell him that you like them (!!!). You could even show him the picture in this topic saying that the little boy who had to take 'cod' every day became the smartest guy in the world!

newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39503000/jpg/_39503968_finding_nemo_203.jpg

I remember this nice little girl at the hospital who had to take a lot of pills everyday...her younger healthy brother was quite jealous. His sister was going in and out of the hospital, receiving so much attention and care from parents, nurses and doctors. He probably felt neglected. I suggested to give him cod caps. A few weeks later his mother told me that he was the happiest boy, with "his" own medicine at last!

CLO really is the most wonderful placebo in the world!
Even now that he's almost 20yrs old, my younger son forgets about his 'cod'.

That's life.

ikod 
« Last Edit: 09/12/2006 22:37:01 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #19 on: 16/09/2006 11:39:10 »
Vitamin D may reduce cancer risk...
quote:
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk for cancer, particularly gastrointestinal tract cancer, according to the results of a study of men reported in the April 5 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.


What the study found was that with the first incremental increase in blood plasma levels of Vitamin D, compared to a lower baseline, there was an associated 17% reduction in total cancer incidence, a 29% reduction in total cancer mortality and a 45 % reduction in digestive-system cancer mortality. There was also some reduced incidence of leukemia.

The authors were quoted as saying, “The vitamin D supplementation necessary to achieve this (incremental increase) may be at least 1500IU/day.” Current recommendations are adequate only to prevent the disease entity associated with a deficiency of vitamin D, or rickets.

Sun exposure was one of the selected study determinants for calculating the expected serum vitamin D levels and was probably the most important source. The authors state, ” If the promise of vitamin D holds, a brief walk in the sun may turn out to be a step toward cancer prevention.” Further, they state “Although melanomas (skin cancer) account for approximately 7000 deaths annually in males in the United States, 295,000 men die annually of all cancers. We estimate a 29% lower cancer mortality rate (i.e., 85,550 fewer deaths annually) if the predicted (serum vitamin D) levels are increased.”

“What does this all mean, Doc?” It means that while getting a regular dose of UVB via the sun is good, don’t get burned. Repeat; don’t get even a little red. You don’t get to have immunity from stupidity by over doing it. It means that while there are some deleterious effects to sun exposure and some people should minimize their exposure, sunlight (vitamin D) may substantially reduce your risk of certain cancers. And not just a little bit. 45%-decreased death rate is not a little bit. Yes, the rate for skin cancer may rise, but if the overall mortality rate drops even half the estimated amount of 85,550 per year and the mortality rate for melanoma doubles you are talking about a net decrease in the mortality stats of 28,775 men’s lives saved or a net drop from 295,000 per year by almost 10% for all cancer. While this study was directed toward men, a reasonable assumption is there would be some benefit for women as well.

This is big, big news! This journal doesn’t print nutritional studies similar to this often.
And the percentages of decrease in mortality rates are momentous. For me this is the earliest stage of substantiation of sunlight as a powerful preventive measure. Sunlight may not be the best or only way to get your D. And our placement on earth (short days in the winter in our latitude) may not allow us the sun exposure we all need. Some may have to supplement with a tablet or capsule. Those in the high risk for deficiency include vegetarians, couch potatoes, women with closely spaced pregnancies, persons with fat malabsorption syndromes and surgical gall bladder removal, certain medications, diabetes, osteoporosis and the elderly. For those that are in the high risk of deficiency group or don’t get the sunlight you need in the winter, 800 I.U.’s per day from the vitamin form D-3 is best. If you use a cod liver oil, keep track of the D in it and your multiple vitamins. If you have questions about Vitamin D, ask me.
May 3, 2006



from: News For Today's Familes - Eastside Chiropractic Newsletter
http://www.eastsidechiro.org/newsletter/index.php?listid=1&id=24&type=text

Vitamin D big "tsunami" is coming closer and closer...

iko



"Il sole dona la vita, il sole se la riprende" M.U. Dianzani, 1975.
« Last Edit: 30/09/2006 13:52:56 by iko »
 

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #20 on: 14/10/2006 13:56:17 »

from: Norwegian Fishing Village Museum
http://www.datadesign.ws/nfmuseum/smithy.htm

COD-LIVER OIL LAMPS

Cod-liver oil lamps are manufactured in the old museum forge, along the lines of the old Nordic cod-liver oil lamps and those found in Nordland from the mid 1800's. The Nordic lamps hang from a wire (or a long hook) attached to the hook on the lamp itself. The Nordland lamps have three wick grooves and require more cod-liver oil than the other type. They can be either be hung up on the wall, or placed on the table.
The cod-liver oil is poured into the upper tray. The slope of the tray can be adjusted by moving the hook along the rail or by placing a suitable object between the table and the lamp. The wick is placed in the tray with the one end in the groove at the front, and can now be lit.

At which point we have "ignited a flame for our ancestors". They did their daily chores in the faint light of these lamps, during the long autumn and winter evenings, for thousands of years.

The flame can be adjusted by pushing or pulling the end of the wick with a stick. If the end of the wick is kept short, the lamp will not smoke or smell. Any cod-liver oil that drips down into the lower tray can be poured back by unhooking the tray.


"...ancient flames to enlight the mistery of leukemia in the new Century..."
iko
« Last Edit: 15/10/2006 07:07:42 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #21 on: 16/10/2006 22:26:14 »
The Cod Liver Oil Factory

...Down by the old harbour, near the beach where they used to haul up the boats, you will find the oldest production plant in Å, the cod-liver oil factory. Here, the fish were braced and hung up on the fish racks to dry, or they were split and salted to make klipfish. The roes were salted in enormous German wine vats of oak, and the cod liver was boiled or steamed into cod liver oil.

In the old days, the liver was just left in the vats and the cod liver oil was skimmed off as the liver fermented in the heat of summer. Later, they began to boil the cod liver in iron cauldrons in order to extract a greater yield of valuable cod liver oil. This was done all year round. The stench was rife all over the fishing village. "You can smell money," people said of both this and the smell of dried fish.

The old Norse name for cod liver oil was "lysi" – light, and the oil was actually used to fuel lamps all over Europe. Moreover, it was used for tanning skins, in the manufacture of paint and soap, and lots more. Cod liver oil and stockfish were for centuries Norway’s most valuable commodity.

Every summer, thousands of barrels of cod liver oil were transported on cargo vessels, the so-called "jekt"s, from Lofoten to Bergen and further on to Europe.
Fish, liver and roes, cooked together and referred to as "mølje", have always been an important and healthy part of the coastal people’s diet. Vitamins A and D and the Omega 3 unsaturated fatty acids in the cod liver oil, helped keep people healthy. It was often said that the cod liver oil makers and other people that took a lot of cod liver oil were seemingly never ill.
Medicinal Cod Liver Oil
Pharmacist Peter Møller wanted to introduce more people to the healthy effects of cod liver oil. In 1854, he built a lined cauldron, filled the space between the cauldron and its lining with water, and steamboiled the fresh cod livers. In this way he greatly improved the quality of the oil. The invention of medicinal cod liver oil was honoured with awards at many trade fairs in Norway and abroad.  Later, the cod liver was steamed in conical oak barrels. In order to extract the last remaining drops of precious cod liver oil, the residue of the liver was then squeezed in a liver press before going to the manufacture of cattle feed or fertiliser.

Today, much of the old production equipment can still be seen in the cod liver oil factory at the Norwegian Fishing Village Museum in Å. Cod liver oil is still produced there in the old fashioned manner, and small bottles of it together with cod liver oil lamps are on sale as mementoes from Lofoten.
   

from:  Norwegian Fishing Village Museum
http://www.lofoten-info.no/history.htm#5

ikod
« Last Edit: 19/11/2006 23:24:56 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #22 on: 24/10/2006 19:18:26 »
Old News from The New Millennium

 
quote:

Scientists crack cod liver oil secret


Cod liver oil can help arthritis sufferers
Scientists have identified exactly why cod liver oil is effective in easing the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.
Researchers at Cardiff University have pinpointed unusual fatty acids, called Omega or n-3 fatty acids, as the crucial factor.
These fatty acids are present in fish oils but not other oils common in the diet.
These findings provide some very interesting explanations as to why granny's cod liver oil therapies have some benefits to arthritis sufferers.
Once incorporated into the cells, the fatty acids reduce the activity of enzymes that are responsible for damaging the cells and causing arthritis.
The fatty acids also cause the "switching off" of another recently-discovered enzyme that causes much of the pain and inflammation in arthritis.
Lead researcher Professor Bruce Caterson said: "This is a particularly interesting finding because there is intense activity in the pharmaceutical industry to find specific drug inhibitors of Cyclooxygenase-2."

Pain and inflammation
The fatty acids also switch off the long-term production of other chemicals known as inflammatory cytokines that prolong the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.
Professor Caterson said: "These findings provide some very interesting explanations as to why granny's cod liver oil therapies have some benefits to arthritis sufferers.
"The good thing about modern day dietary supplements is that fish oil is available in capsules, thus preventing the most obvious deterrent to this treatment - the smell that precedes the terrible taste!"

Dr Madeline Devey, scientific secretary of the Arthritis Research Campaign, said the research was "terrifically exciting".

She said: "Taking fish oil is something that lots of people do because it makes them feel better, but we had had no idea why.

"Any good science that can be thrown at a common self-medication is a really good idea, and it might enable us to manipulate diet in a slightly more rational way than we do at the moment."

Sunday, 16 January, 2000, 01:03 GMT
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/604014.stm



ikod

« Last Edit: 24/10/2006 19:25:52 by iko »
 

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #23 on: 25/10/2006 23:29:21 »
Allow me some Cut & Paste from Physiology & Medicine.

Topic: "Many adults with psychiatric disorders may also have undiagnosed ADHD"
           by Gaia



Let me give my usual codtribution to this topic.
Rough quick search through PubMed database:
ADHD: 11181 citations
ADHD and omega-3: 15 cit.
I chose 2 recent ones for you
To open the discussion.
(I'm afraid I'm not your expert)

ikod



Omega-3 fatty acids in ADHD and related neurodevelopmental disorders.

Richardson AJ.
Dept.Physiology, Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, UK.

Omega-3 fatty acids are dietary essentials, and are critical to brain development and function. Increasing evidence suggests that a relative lack of omega-3 may contribute to many psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. This review focuses on the possible role of omega-3 in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related childhood developmental disorders, evaluating the existing evidence from both research and clinical perspectives. Theory and experimental evidence support a role for omega-3 in ADHD, dyslexia, developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and autism. Results from controlled treatment trials are mixed, but the few studies in this area have involved different populations and treatment formulations. Dietary supplementation with fish oils (providing EPA and DHA) appears to alleviate ADHD-related symptoms in at least some children, and one study of DCD children also found benefits for academic achievement. Larger trials are now needed to confirm these findings, and to establish the specificity and durability of any treatment effects as well as optimal formulations and dosages. Omega-3 is not supported by current evidence as a primary treatment for ADHD or related conditions, but further research in this area is clearly warranted. Given their relative safety and general health benefits, omega-3 fatty acids offer a promising complementary approach to standard treatments.

Int Rev Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;18(2):155-72. Review.






Omega-3 fatty acid status in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Antalis CJ, Stevens LJ, Campbell M, Pazdro R, Ericson K, Burgess JR.
Department of Foods and Nutrition, West Lafayette IN 47909-2059, USA.

Lower levels of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, in blood have repeatedly been associated with a variety of behavioral disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The exact nature of this relationship is not yet clear. We have studied children with ADHD who exhibited skin and thirst symptoms classically associated with essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency, altered plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles, and dietary intake patterns that do not differ significantly from controls. This led us to focus on a potential metabolic insufficiency as the cause for the altered fatty acid phenotype. Here we review previous work and present new data expanding our observations into the young adult population. The frequency of thirst and skin symptoms was greater in newly diagnosed individuals with ADHD (n = 35) versus control individuals without behavioral problems (n = 112) drawn from the Purdue student population. A follow up case-control study with participants willing to provide a blood sample, a urine sample, a questionnaire about their general health, and dietary intake records was conducted with balancing based on gender, age, body mass index, smoking and ethnicity. A number of biochemical measures were analyzed including status markers for several nutrients and antioxidants, markers of oxidative stress, inflammation markers, and fatty acid profiles in the blood. The proportion of omega-3 fatty acids was found to be significantly lower in plasma phospholipids and erythrocytes in the ADHD group versus controls whereas saturated fatty acid proportions were higher. Intake of saturated fat was 30% higher in the ADHD group, but intake of all other nutrients was not different. Surprisingly, no evidence of elevated oxidative stress was found based on analysis of blood and urine samples. Indeed, serum ferritin, magnesium, and ascorbate concentrations were higher in the ADHD group, but iron, zinc, and vitamin B6 were not different. Our brief survey of biochemical and nutritional parameters did not give us any insight into the etiology of lower omega-3 fatty acids, but considering the consistency of the observation in multiple ADHD populations continued research in this field is encouraged.

Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2006 Oct-Nov;75(4-5):299-308. Epub 2006 Sep 8





...Hey, I just found this in the "Garlic"
   topic, GuestBook of this Forum!


...
A double-sided personality? Schizophrenia? Bipolar disorder?
Who knows...

...do you like seefood?  ;D [:o)]





Not long ago I read that those peculiar omega-3 so good for our brain (EPA & DHA) that
we get from sea creatures, mainly blue-fish, seem to be made by the ocean plankton itself.
Humans and even those fishlets are not able to synthesize them.
It is a wonderful hypothesis: those special unsaturated fatty acids represent a sort of vitamin
for all of us and come directly from where life originated million years ago on this Planet...
Our survival seems to be inevitably bound to the sea and the sunshine.




Bikod





End of the first CODpage


iko     
« Last Edit: 04/08/2010 18:31:16 by iko »
 

Offline Grecian

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #24 on: 27/10/2006 22:13:55 »

Interesting info. Iko, thank you.


Love you lots

Helena xx


 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #24 on: 27/10/2006 22:13:55 »

 

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