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Author Topic: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?  (Read 309031 times)

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #100 on: 29/01/2008 13:29:51 »
It's never too late (sometimes)...
If you followed this thread so far,
you deserve to watch this free video:

"The Vitamin D Pandemic and its Health Consequences"

Presented by Michael Holick, PhD, MD, Professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics
and director of the General Clinical Research Center at Boston University Medical Center
Keynote address at the opening ceremony of the 34th European Symposium on Calcified Tissues, Copenhagen 5 May, 2007



 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #101 on: 29/01/2008 17:43:21 »
It's never too late (sometimes)...
If you followed this thread so far,
you deserve to watch this free video:

"The Vitamin D Pandemic and its Health Consequences"

Presented by Michael Holick, PhD, MD, Professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics
and director of the General Clinical Research Center at Boston University Medical Center
Keynote address at the opening ceremony of the 34th European Symposium on Calcified Tissues, Copenhagen 5 May, 2007




Iko I can't get the link to work. It goes to a page but the video never loads.And I cannot even see the whole page to press a start video button or anything like that! My Player will try to open the link but then says that totem cannot play it because the movie is not there at the specified link!
« Last Edit: 29/01/2008 17:45:56 by Karen W. »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #102 on: 29/01/2008 18:02:39 »
Hi Karen,
good to see that you belong to
the liquid-sunshine jazz band!

Try to start from:   http://www.vitamindcouncil.com/

First "Item of interest":
Quote
Video of Professor Michael Holick explaining the vitamin D revolution.
Michael Holick, a respected Vitamin D researcher recently gave keynote address about Vitamin D.
It is a great overview of the entire situation. Watch the video- The Vitamin D Pandemic and its Health Consequences

...it should work!   ;)

I'm watching it over and over...to improve my english of course!
(Joke, I love this stuff: even helicobacter connections are mentioned)

ikoD  [^]



« Last Edit: 14/02/2008 13:43:17 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #103 on: 29/01/2008 19:47:39 »
Hi Iko.. Ok I tried to start from there .. No good. I think it may be this new linux system I am not sure.. I will see if George can see it, or rather play it!

Man You can say that again.. It is wet here and raining like crazy.. supposed to continue all week and through the weekend for the second week in a row! LOL... Its wet for sure.. Had some snow for one and 1/2 days but it is gone:(

Your English has been great so far.. No worries. I bet you do love it.. I want to see it too. Have an appointment today.. supposed to be D_DAY for the antibiotics!
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #104 on: 31/01/2008 11:33:15 »
If you like videos, here is Dr. John Cannell's interview on CBNnews.com
which I just found searching in a gold mine (vitamindcouncil):






...plus this other video by Gailon Totheroh about Cancer's Natural Enemy: http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/175085.aspx
« Last Edit: 06/02/2008 15:18:33 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #105 on: 06/02/2008 14:41:39 »
Encouraging news about vitamin D RDA from Canada, a northern country were UVrays are precious....

Quote

...
It's not a miracle pill. But early indications suggest when it comes to health measures you can control, taking vitamin D may rank up there with quitting smoking.

Yet nearly all Canadians are probably deficient in this so-called "sunshine" vitamin, the only vitamin you can't get in large amounts from a good diet.

And much of this information has been staring scientists in the face, generally unrecognized, for 40 years or more.
...




« Last Edit: 06/02/2008 14:45:25 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #106 on: 06/02/2008 15:11:45 »
If you like videos, here is Dr. John Cannell's interview on CBNnews.com
which I just found searching in a gold mine (vitamindcouncil):




Thanks Iko It was interesting!
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #107 on: 11/02/2008 22:32:29 »
Repetita juvant...



Hypothesis-Ultraviolet-B Irradiance and Vitamin D Reduce the Risk
of Viral Infections and thus Their Sequelae, Including Autoimmune Diseases and some Cancers.


Grant WB.
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC), San Francisco, CA, USA.

Many viral infections reach clinical significance in winter, when it is cold, relative humidity is lowest and vitamin D production from solar ultraviolet-B irradiation is at its nadir. Several autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and asthma, are linked to viral infections. Vitamin D, through induction of cathelicidin, which effectively combats both bacterial and viral infections, may reduce the risk of several autoimmune diseases and cancers by reducing the development of viral infections. Some types of cancer are also linked to viral infections. The cancers with seemingly important risk from viral infections important in winter, based on correlations with increasing latitude in the United States, an index of wintertime solar ultraviolet-B dose and vitamin D, are bladder, prostate, testicular and thyroid cancer, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and, perhaps, gastric cancer. The evidence examined includes the role of viruses in the etiology of these diseases, the geographic and seasonal variation of these diseases, and the time of life when vitamin D is effective in reducing the risk of disease. In general, the evidence supports the hypothesis.
However, further work is required to evaluate this hypothesis.

Photochem Photobiol. 2008 Jan 7 [Epub ahead of print]




« Last Edit: 11/02/2008 22:36:58 by iko »
 

Offline JimBob

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #108 on: 12/02/2008 03:41:23 »
Iko,

Is cod liver oil the same type of Omega-3 oils used (supposedly) for lowering cholesterol?
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #109 on: 12/02/2008 14:15:41 »
Hi JimBob,

welcome to the codmaniac thread.
There is a difference between fish LIVER oils
and simple fish oils:

Quote
Hi Carolyn! Thanks for calling...
Cod liver oil is not exactly like fish oil


Note:
fish liver oils contain vit.A+Vit.D3+omega-3 fatty acids.
fish oilscontain omega-3 fatty acids mainly.

Vit.A&Vit.D3 are fat-soluble and do accumulate in the body: doses higher than reccomended may lead to toxicity.

iko

So when you give fish oil you are giving omega-3 fatty acids mainly.
Omega-3 may have amazing effects on the human brain and they are currently being tested in patients with bipolar disorder (a type of psychotic depression): there are positive and negative reports, as usual. They just started few years ago...it is a promising field.
There is an interesting book about this by a pharmacology professor, Andrew L. Stoll:

http://www.amazon.com/Omega-3-Connection-Groundbreaking-Anti-depression-Program/dp/0684871386

In proper doses you may be sure to give good nutrients (they come from the sea plankton!) and no toxicity. Even if they don't work, your kid will be safe and well nourished.
I don't know ADHD enough to reccomend anything, but speaking of nutritional supplement and reminding the paper cited at the beginning of this topic, I would suggest to alternate fish oil with CLO.
Vitamin D has also positive effects on the brain.
Check carefully expiring date and storage reccomended conditions: these oils may go rancid quick.

Control of the nervous system

Vitamin D3 actions in the nervous system include induction of Vitamin D Receptor content (VDR is expressed in the brain and on several regions of the central and peripheral nervous system), the conductance velocity of motor neurons, and the synthesis of neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factors and neurotrophyns, that prevent the loss of injured neurons. Vit.D3 also enhances the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, a potential candidate for treatment of Parkinson's disease.
In addition to increased nerve growth factor, combined treatment with Vit.D3 and 17beta-estradiol in rats elicits neuroprotective effects after focal cortical ischemia induced through the photothrombosis model.
Vit.D3 influences critical components of orderly brain development. In the embrionic rat brain, the VDR increases steadly from day 15 to day 23, and Vit.D3 induces the expression of nerve growth factor and stimulates neurite outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal explants and primary cultures.  Low prenatal Vitamin D in utero leads to increased brain size, brain shape, enlarged ventricles, and reduced expression of nerve growth factor in the neonatal rat.
The association of vit.D deficiency and abnormal brain development makes Vitamin D an attractive candidate for tretment of schizophrenia, a disorder resulting from gene-environment interactions that disrupt brain development.
Also, transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency in rats induces hyperlocomotion in adulthood with sever motor abnormalities.

simplified by me from a nice and thick recent review by Adriana S. Dusso and coll.:

Vitamin D
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15951480&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

Shortly, there is increasing experimental evidence that vitamin D is just good for the brain.
No negative effects are reported.
Take care
iko

Post Scriptum:
I just found a positive report about ADHD and fish oil. You probably started from this one...let me know.  There are so many references to get lost between papers and scientific reports.
It's in another Forum! What a fantastic gigantic basket this Google is...

http://www.feelgoodforum.com/about1564.html
...

You can scroll these pages to find out specific actions
of these 3 main components of cod LIVER oil:
Vitamin A, vitamin D3, Omega-3 fatty acids.

ikoD
« Last Edit: 12/02/2008 14:19:51 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #110 on: 13/02/2008 13:54:51 »
Iko,

Is cod liver oil the same type of Omega-3 oils used (supposedly) for lowering cholesterol?

Omega-3 fatty acids come from fishes or plants (flaxseed, slightly different kind).
There are studies suggesting a 10-20% reduction in blood cholesterol after weeks of regular supplement in the diet, but anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects sound much more interesting to me.
Our brains seem to crave for these precious oils (EPA & DHA), and related reports about feeding pregnant mothers and giving 'cod' to young children seem really promising (see 1st page of this topic).

ikoD


« Last Edit: 17/02/2008 11:40:56 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 17/02/2008 11:14:26 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #112 on: 20/03/2008 13:13:23 »
RDA for vitamin D3 should be updated.
Over 2000 units per day recommended:

Optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels for multiple health outcomes.


Bischoff-Ferrari HA.
Deptartment of Rheumatology, Institute of Physical Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. heike.bischoff@usz.ch

Recent evidence suggests that higher vitamin D intakes beyond current recommendations may be associated with better health outcomes. In this chapter, evidence is summarized from different studies that evaluate threshold levels for serum 25(OH)D levels in relation to bone mineral density (BMD), lower extremity function, dental health, risk of falls, admission to nursing home, fractures, cancer prevention and incident hypertension. For all endpoints, the most advantageous serum levels for 25(OH)D appeared to be at least 75 nmol/l (30 ng/ml) and for cancer prevention, desirable 25(OH)D levels are between 90-120 nmol/l (36-48 ng/ml). An intake of no less than 1000 IU (25 mcg) of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) per day for all adults may bring at least 50% of the population up to 75 nmol/l.

Thus, higher doses of vitamin D are needed to bring most individuals into the desired range. While estimates suggest that 2000 IU vitamin D3 per day may successfully and safely achieve this goal, the implications of 2000 IU or higher doses for the total adult population need to be addressed in future studies.

 Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008;624:55-71.




« Last Edit: 20/03/2008 13:18:25 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #113 on: 29/03/2008 21:21:27 »
Historical annotation:

Cod liver oil and malaria

Positive effect in experimental conditions.
Reported twenty years ago.
Never confirmed, rarely cited, buried in the literature.
But now you can easily find it in seconds thanks to technology.
And this is a new, very positive fact.


Qinghaosu, dietary vitamin E, selenium, and cod-liver oil: effect on the susceptibility of mice to the malarial parasite Plasmodium yoelii.


Levander OA, Ager AL Jr, Morris VC, May RG.Human Nutrition Research Center, US Department of Agriculture, MD 20705.

Young female mice were fed torula-yeast-based diets deficient in vitamin E or selenium or supplemented with cod-liver oil to determine the effect of host antioxidant status on the therapeutic efficacy of the Chinese traditional antimalarial drug qinghaosu (QHS), a sesquiterpene endoperoxide. Vitamin E deficiency enhanced the antimalarial action of QHS against Plasmodium yoelii, both in terms of decreased parasitemia and improved survival but Se deficiency did not. A vitamin E-deficient diet containing 5% cod-liver oil had such strong antimalarial activity in itself that no additional therapeutic benefit of QHS could be demonstrated. Hematocrit values in parasitized mice treated with QHS or fed the cod-liver-oil-supplemented, vitamin E-deficient diet were normal. Nutritional manipulation of host antioxidant status may provide a promising prophylactic and/or therapeutic tool for the control of malaria.

Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 Aug;50(2):346-52.


Free full text if you need more: right on your desk.  Unbelievable.

« Last Edit: 29/03/2008 21:27:05 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #114 on: 29/03/2008 21:28:19 »
Run on vitamin D after study

Dr. Michael Pollak, an oncologist and director of the cancer-prevention centre at Montreal's Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, interviewed by Andy Riga for the Montreal Gazette, CanWest News Service.

Monday, June 18, 2007

Quote
...
"No one is naive," he said. "Vitamin D optimization won't eliminate cancer by any stretch of the imagination, but if it has no downsides and it cuts cancer incidence, it could be worthwhile. Nobody wants to overlook a clue here. This is what everybody wants - a simple pill that reduces cancer risk."



 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #115 on: 12/04/2008 17:28:01 »
35000 viewers!
Let's celebrate this old thread with an ancient quote:

Quote
"Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion,
 
follow humbly wherever and whatever abysses nature leads,

or you will learn nothing."

Thomas Henry Huxley


« Last Edit: 22/04/2008 13:28:01 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #116 on: 04/05/2008 22:33:08 »

We know from the 'Shanghai report' that daily doses of vitamins A and D (actually cod liver oil!) -taken for at least one year- could be able to reduce leukemia incidence to half or 1/3.
It's not much, but we (parents) should give it a chance and offer this protection to our sick children, to avert relapse risk.
 


Yes, an autoquote.
Waiting for cod4ALL and his comments on the 'Mansoura report' and those striking data about vitamin D deficiency at 0-3-12 months after a diagnosis of childhood leukemia (47 cases: further studies are obviously needed...in the next 2-3 decades).

for at least one year

Why such a long lag-phase of cod-therapy is needed before achieving a significant anti-leukemia effect?  Could this be bound mainly to a vitamin D action?

Well, simple minds can only give simple answers:

If proper levels of vitamin D are needed to counteract leukemia onset, a deficient child (and most humans seem to be vitamin D deficient these days!) gets a relatively small amount of the sunshine vitamin from daily doses of cod liver oil.   Maybe vitamin A helps, together with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E, but daily vitamin D through 'cod' is about 400 I.U.
Not much to treat deficiency, so it should take longer to work.

Maybe vitamin A helps

This is a recent medical hypothesis: vitamin A could prevent toxicity of vitamin D and cooperate with vitamin K too...all the fat-soluble vitamins together!
Isn't it wonderful?   ;)



Vitamin D toxicity redefined: vitamin K and the molecular mechanism.


Masterjohn C.
Weston A. Price Foundation, 4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20016, United States. ChrisMasterjohn@gmail.com

The dose of vitamin D that some researchers recommend as optimally therapeutic exceeds that officially recognized as safe by a factor of two; it is therefore important to determine the precise mechanism by which excessive doses of vitamin D exert toxicity so that physicians and other health care practitioners may understand how to use optimally therapeutic doses of this vitamin without the risk of adverse effects. Although the toxicity of vitamin D has conventionally been attributed to its induction of hypercalcemia, animal studies show that the toxic endpoints observed in response to hypervitaminosis D such as anorexia, lethargy, growth retardation, bone resorption, soft tissue calcification, and death can be dissociated from the hypercalcemia that usually accompanies them, demanding that an alternative explanation for the mechanism of vitamin D toxicity be developed.
The hypothesis presented in this paper proposes the novel understanding that vitamin D exerts toxicity by inducing a deficiency of vitamin K. According to this model, vitamin D increases the expression of proteins whose activation depends on vitamin K-mediated carboxylation; as the demand for carboxylation increases, the pool of vitamin K is depleted. Since vitamin K is essential to the nervous system and plays important roles in protecting against bone loss and calcification of the peripheral soft tissues, its deficiency results in the symptoms associated with hypervitaminosis D. This hypothesis is circumstantially supported by the observation that animals deficient in vitamin K or vitamin K-dependent proteins exhibit remarkable similarities to animals fed toxic doses of vitamin D, and the observation that vitamin D and the vitamin K-inhibitor Warfarin have similar toxicity profiles and exert toxicity synergistically when combined.
The hypothesis further proposes that vitamin A protects against the toxicity of vitamin D by decreasing the expression of vitamin K-dependent proteins and thereby exerting a vitamin K-sparing effect. If animal experiments can confirm this hypothesis, the models by which the maximum safe dose is determined would need to be revised. Physicians and other health care practitioners would be able to treat patients with doses of vitamin D that possess greater therapeutic value than those currently being used while avoiding the risk of adverse effects by administering vitamin D together with vitamins A and K.

Med Hypotheses. 2007;68(5):1026-34.




New recipe

Quote
"Physicians and other health care practitioners would be able to treat patients with doses of vitamin D that possess greater therapeutic value than those currently being used while avoiding the risk of adverse effects by administering vitamin D together with vitamins A and K."
Med Hypotheses. 2007;68(5):1026-34.

And here we go with cod liver oil (containing vitamins A and D) plus spinaches, cabbage, cauliflower, and other green leafy vegetables (rich of vitamin K)!
We might even give rosemary (carnosic acid) and sesamolin a chance.
And never forget orange juice! (but this is another story)  ;D






Cut&Paste from the "Cod liver oil and leukemia" thread in Physiol.&Medicine.

Masterjohn's hypothesis about cooperation between the three fat-soluble vitamins is just fascinating.
If proper levels of vitamin A were required to avoid vitamin D toxicity, or to optimize its effects, giving cod liver oil containing Vitamins A and D (text-string from the Shanghai report!) would be much better and safer than recommending vitamin D supplements alone.
Ancient studies first suggested this protective effect, and they are properly cited in the article:

11) Thoenes F.    Uber die Korrelation von vitamin A and D.
       Deutsch Med Woch 1935;61:2079.

12) Morgan AF, Kimmel l, Hawkins NC.    A comparison of the hypervitaminoses induced by irradiated ergosterol and fish liver oil concentrates.
       J Biol Chem  1937;120(1):85-102.

13) Clark I, Basset CAL.    The amelioration of hypervitaminosis D in rats with vitamin A.
       J Exp Med  1962;115:147-56.
« Last Edit: 04/05/2008 22:56:17 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #117 on: 08/05/2008 08:20:02 »
Could by any chance the old remedy, a relic from the past,
an inexpensive nutrient containing vitamins A and D,
help leukemic patients in the long run, AFTER treatment?
According to this recent study, the answer is yes.



Differentiation-inducing liposoluble vitamin deficiency may explain
frequent secondary solid tumors after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Minireview.


Gedikoglu G, Altinoz MA.

Secondary cancers are among the most threatening long-term health problems of hematopoetic stem cell- transplant (HSCT) patients. There are several lines of evidence indicating the possibility of a prolonged Vitamin A deficiency for solid tumor-type secondary cancers: I- Solid tumors such as oral cavity, head/neck region squamous carcinomas, skin cancers and melanomas, where lowered Vitamin A concentrations and chemo-preventing activity of its derivatives (retinoids) are most explicitly proven, arise much more frequently than others. II- Early monitorings: A significant retinol deficiency in HSCT patients is detectable along with a severity of mucositis and the vulnerability to infection. III- Monitoring of other liposoluble vitamins: Vitamin D, a differentiation-inducing vitamin like Vitamin A, showed a sustained decrease. Another similarity of these two vitamins is that they also depend on intestinal absorption and are decreased due to bowel injury by conditioning agents and chronic graft-versus-host disease. IV- Peroxidative reactions and inflammation can directly exhaust retinol levels despite sufficient intake. Considering the similar inhibitory role of Vitamin D analogs (deltanoids) on squamous carcinomas, skin tumors and melanomas, we propose that animal studies and extended vitamin surveillance studies in HSCT patients may unfold a preventive strategy against long-term complications.

Neoplasma. 2008;55(1):1-9.


 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #118 on: 08/05/2008 08:25:28 »
"Mother was right about cod liver oil"

Griffing GT.
Medscape J Med. 2008 Jan 11;10(1):8.


Quote
There are many stories of mothers forcing their children to take cod liver oil.

Centuries ago, northern Europeans used cod liver oil to protect them from the cold. It was made from the livers of Gadus morhua and other species of cod. Cod liver oil was said to relieve such complaints as rheumatism, aching joints, and stiff muscles.

At the beginning of the 20th century, scientists established that cod liver oil was antirachitic, and it became commonplace for mothers to give it to their children.[1,2]

It turns out cod liver oil contains large amounts of vitamins A, D, and omega-3 fatty acids, and the health benefits may go beyond rheumatism and rickets.[3]

...


« Last Edit: 08/05/2008 08:31:09 by iko »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #119 on: 08/05/2008 09:39:50 »
I take cod liver oil and fish oil, infcat just got some more from Holland and Barrat for very little money 75% reduction at the moment for anyone wanting to give this a whirl
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #120 on: 09/05/2008 09:25:39 »
Quote



Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.


Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
Atascadero State Hospital, 10333 El Camino Real, Atascadero, California 93422, USA. jcannell@ash.dmh.ca.gov

The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.





I know you cannot read it and I'm perfectly aware that most people aren't interested in Dr. Cannell's crusade on vitamindcouncil.com as well.
These days people read messages like these:

Quote

"Keep away from the sun to avoid cancer"

"multivitamin pills shorten your life"


Something must be wrong around here.
So, before we hear the usual folks blaming vitamin D supporters for huge profits from celebrity and vitamin pills plus UV lamps market, let me report the final words of this superb review by John Cannell and his colleagues.
Please do read the complete article: if you had enough time to read this crap page, you MUST find a few minutes for real Science!



Quote


...
To the authors' knowledge, plaintiffs' attorneys are not yet involved in the vitamin D debate.   After the findings of Lappe et al. (1), it may only be a matter of time until lawsuits against physicians begin to appear, claiming that physicians dispensed sun-avoidance advice, but negligently failed to diagnose and treat the consequent vitamin D deficiency, leading to fatal cancers.   Unless the future literature fails to support the present, such medical malpractice suits may become commonplace.

Finally, physicians and policy-makers should understand that much of the future of vitamin D is out of their hands.   Inexpensive high-dose supplements are now widely available to the American public over-the-counter and to the world via the Internet.   Sunlight remains free.   A Google search for 'vitamin D' reveals several million hits.   After the Canadian Cancer Society recently recommended 1000 IU/day for all Canadian adults in the wintertime, vitamin D disappeared off the shelves, causing a shortage during the summer.

The pleiotropic actions and unique pharmacology of vitamin D mean educated patients, on their own, can entirely control their own tissue levels of this steroid, through either UVB exposure or over-the-counter supplementation.   Given the attitudes that some in mainstream medicine have about any substance with the word 'vitamin' in it (105), the public and not the medical profession may be the first to enter the vitamin D era.






reference 105:


Battling quackery: attitudes about micronutrient supplements in American academic medicine.

Goodwin JS, Tangum MR.
Center on Aging, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77555-0460, USA.

...sorry, $15 to read even the only abstract!!!  >:(

Arch Intern Med. 1998 Nov 9;158(20):2187-91.




« Last Edit: 28/05/2008 21:42:31 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #121 on: 28/05/2008 17:20:46 »
Quote
...
The pleiotropic actions and unique pharmacology of vitamin D mean educated patients, on their own, can entirely control their own tissue levels of this steroid, through either UVB exposure or over-the-counter supplementation.   Given the attitudes that some in mainstream medicine have about any substance with the word 'vitamin' in it (105), the public and not the medical profession may be the first to enter the vitamin D era.



..."educated patients" doesn't necessarily mean that they had read up on vitamin D.
In some cases personal experience helped to solve this problem from the very start.

Many years ago, at the camping ground near the seaside where I went with my family, I noticed four elderly men around a table, playing cards.
One of the group was 'reeeally' tanned, almost black, much darker than the others.  Another friend passed by and started chatting.
After having said to the overtanned fellow: "You surely took a lot of sun this summer!",
he got this quick reply, probably the same given every day to others, over and over:

"Well, when I don't do this, I get aches and pains in the winter"


That wise old man had found out something important for his health all by himself.
He actually tested it "on his own skin"... year after year, then he drew his conclusions.
No 1988 Shanghai report, no Timo Timonen's hypothesis, and much before the "resurrection of vitamin D".





...Italian Riviera Ligure is perfect to make good vitamin D: sunshine is free!



          
http://www.equilibriarte.org/upload/forum/070805145950-238.jpg
http://www.visitnorway.com/ImageVault/Images/id_827/conversionFormat_13/ImageVaultHandler.aspx
http://www.unpluggedvalthorens.com/images/kidsss1.jpg


...making plenty of vitamin D on a winter weekend!

« Last Edit: 19/12/2008 18:50:23 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #122 on: 09/06/2008 18:14:49 »
Cut and paste from another thread:

Neilep, our dearest moderator, asked: "Why are colds, sore throats, colds etc so much more common in winter ?"




Easy question Neilepus amicissimus,

the answer MIGHT be right here:

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=529704

Enjoy

ikod

AWESOME !!!..Vitamin D Rules !!...If only I knew a good source of Vitamin D !! ;) ;)

Hi Neilepus rapidofastissimus thread-makerus!

Cod liver oil is no good for 'boosting' your vitamin D: plenty of vitamin A and omega-3 fatty acids plus 'some' vitamin D.
It probably works in the long run as far as vitamin D3 is concerned (approx. 400 I.U./day).
So dear old 'cod' is still used daily in northern Europe, during months with the 'R': from September to April.
Short 'flashes' (30min.) of sushine between 10a.m. to 2p.m. at a proper latitude (no clouds please) really boost your  skin production of vitamin D3 (>20,000 I.U.)

Sorry you cannot read the complete paper previously cited by ikus.
You would be impressed by a 1918 study about flu reported in the article.

Shortly, in 1918, trying to find out how influenza viruses managed to infect people and to verify relative incubation times (2-3 days), proper experiments were set up using human volunteers.  Forget the details  [xx(]...but secretions from infected patients were carefully collected, mixed up and flushed through the nostrils of brave volunteers.   :o
Surprisingly enough, nothing happened afterwards, so the experiment was considered a 'fiasco'.


Only now, 90 years later, a crystal-clear explanation is ready for this.
Anti-infective properties of vitamin D were proved only 4-5 years ago, when the cathelicidin pathway was described.
Those volunteers were healthy men from the Navy.
Probably well-tanned all year round, perfectly healthy, they had been selected for not having had a flu in the previous months, to avoid an 'immunization' bias.
Maybe a good level of vitamin D helped them to block the influenza viruses quickly.

For the same reason, somewhere in 2005, most (maybe all) vitamin D supplemented patients in Dr J.Cannell department, Atascadero CA, went through a big influenza epidemic perfectly healthy.
John Cannell was the 'prepared mind', times were changing, so the vitamindcouncil.com crusade started.

One hypothesis out of many is that flu viruses do circulate all year round in humans, but give troubles in some people only in the cold season, i.e. when vitamin D levels are low.
So much for the anti-flu vaccination campaigns.




P.S.
The reason why Chris is not commenting on these issues is simple: he is a virology expert and knows much better than others the other side of the coin.
Everybody is waiting for final scientific proofs about vitamin D and flu, but most of all about vitamin D benefits in other dreadful diseases.
Wonderful hypotheses need extended and accurate studies to become Science.  It takes so much time.
I'm sure Chris will never have to decide from trembling hypotheses whether to give 'cod' to one of his kids or NOT.
It happened to me, after years of serious searches and rigorous evidence-based training.
That's life.



Hypothesis--ultraviolet-B irradiance and vitamin D reduce the risk of viral infections and thus their sequelae, including autoimmune diseases and some cancers.


Grant WB.
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. wgrant@infionline.net

Many viral infections reach clinical significance in winter, when it is cold, relative humidity is lowest and vitamin D production from solar ultraviolet-B irradiation is at its nadir. Several autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and asthma, are linked to viral infections. Vitamin D, through induction of cathelicidin, which effectively combats both bacterial and viral infections, may reduce the risk of several autoimmune diseases and cancers by reducing the development of viral infections. Some types of cancer are also linked to viral infections. The cancers with seemingly important risk from viral infections important in winter, based on correlations with increasing latitude in the United States, an index of wintertime solar ultraviolet-B dose and vitamin D, are bladder, prostate, testicular and thyroid cancer, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and, perhaps, gastric cancer. The evidence examined includes the role of viruses in the etiology of these diseases, the geographic and seasonal variation of these diseases, and the time of life when vitamin D is effective in reducing the risk of disease. In general, the evidence supports the hypothesis. However, further work is required to evaluate this hypothesis.

Photochem Photobiol. 2008 Mar-Apr;84(2):356-65. Epub 2008 Jan 7.



« Last Edit: 19/10/2008 14:19:48 by iko »
 

Offline grumpy old mare

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #123 on: 18/06/2008 18:40:53 »
Quote
"Keep away from the sun to avoid cancer"
"multivitamin pills shorten your life"


Surely there was (at least here in the slightly cooler regions of Europe) never any advise to totally avoid the sun, only to avoid getting sunburnt, which is a different 'kettle of fish'.
I thought it was a well known fact that we need the sun/exposure to sunlight (just think of rickets and "SAD")? Even though I have a 'fair complexion', I was never told by any physician to avoid the sun.

I've never heard of 'multivitamin pills shorten your life', only the sensible warning that if vitamins are taken in excessive amounts it may lead to unwanted side effects. Just like a bit of wine or beer is quite healthy - drinking large quantities is definitely not good for your health.

As with most things in life - moderation is the key.
« Last Edit: 18/06/2008 18:47:22 by grumpy old mare »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #124 on: 18/06/2008 22:31:17 »
You are perfectly right, grumpy old mare,
but moderation and wisdom seem quite rare...
These days vitamin D "supporters" are fighting
to support the Common Sense Committee!
Did you watch Michael Holick's conference?
I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy it.
Take care

ikoD



It's never too late (sometimes)...
If you followed this thread so far,
you deserve to watch this free video:

"The Vitamin D Pandemic and its Health Consequences"

Presented by Michael Holick, PhD, MD, Professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics
and director of the General Clinical Research Center at Boston University Medical Center
Keynote address at the opening ceremony of the 34th European Symposium on Calcified Tissues, Copenhagen 5 May, 2007





This is what I meant as media anti-sunlight campaigns:


http://newsletter.vitalchoice.com/e_article000867414.cfm?x=b9Wm4WL,b4cFSjTj,w

« Last Edit: 25/06/2008 14:36:45 by iko »
 

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Re: Is Cod Liver Oil actually good for us?
« Reply #124 on: 18/06/2008 22:31:17 »

 

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