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Author Topic: What can I do with a scientific training, apart from research?  (Read 1174 times)

Offline Promilla

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Hi everyone!
So my question is more about being a scientists, rather than science itself.
I really have  great passion for science. I love getting to know the World round me, learning new stuff, exploring. Natural sciences are of my great interest. I m currently studying chemistry (and a bit of biology) at university. However, I already know that I don't want to spend my life in  laboratory. (I have quite poor health so spending time with chemicals every day is not doing me any good)As perhaps people connected to science read this forum, do you maybe know of any science careers (connected to chemistry, biology), for which practical work (at least not that with chemicals, microbes, animals [allergy]) is not necessary? I'e always wanted to do research, but it seems nowadays only practical work is what counts. I'm not really good at computing, so this also is out. I would really appreciate your answers!
Cheers,
Promilla
« Last Edit: 25/03/2014 21:52:12 by chris »


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Being a scientist
« Reply #1 on: 25/03/2014 14:54:09 »
Try physics rather than chemistry (which is really just physics in a bucket!)? I've generally avoided too much contact with software and had an entirely absorbing career in experimental radiation physics and clinical engineering, messing about with MRI machines and anything from dental x-rays to dismantling nuclear power plant.

Unfortunately the interesting parts of chemistry and biology will always involve chemicals and living things! The good news is that industrial and medical laboratories and production plants tend to be a lot cleaner than university labs so don't give up hope just yet.

Science journalism, including the popular press, trade magazines and academic publications, and scientific/medical librarianship, can be fun too.   
« Last Edit: 25/03/2014 15:37:56 by alancalverd »
 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: Being a scientist
« Reply #2 on: 25/03/2014 20:00:42 »
If you rule out laboratory, computation and field work, that essentially eliminates primary research altogether.

But there are many opportunities for those who understand science well enough to take advantage of new-found (and time-tested) information. Policy, law, logistics, patent-related, etc. in addition to education/journalism focuses.
 

Offline Promilla

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Thank you very much for the answers. Maybe it's time to go more towards computing. And if that's true, that working in industry or doing proper research does not require breathing nasty stuff, or spending time with animals which cause allergies, then maybe I will give it a go!
Thanks!
 

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