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Offline jeffreyH

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A question on gravity
« on: 18/04/2014 15:33:26 »
Does the spatial distance between individual particles have an effect on the strength of the gravitational field?


 

Offline JP

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #1 on: 18/04/2014 16:53:44 »
You need to clarify your language to get a precise answer to this.  If you're talking Newtonian gravity, then there is an inverse-square law field created by every particle of the form mG/r^2.  The field at a point has to do with how far you are from all particles in the system.  In general relativity, things get uglier, but in general the field still depends on how the mass and energy of particles is distributed in space with respect to the observation point.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #2 on: 18/04/2014 18:04:30 »
You need to clarify your language to get a precise answer to this.  If you're talking Newtonian gravity, then there is an inverse-square law field created by every particle of the form mG/r^2.  The field at a point has to do with how far you are from all particles in the system.  In general relativity, things get uglier, but in general the field still depends on how the mass and energy of particles is distributed in space with respect to the observation point.

The question was posed to start a debate. I want some different views on the subject. I am referring to solid matter by the way.
 

Offline JP

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #3 on: 18/04/2014 19:06:40 »
Since differing views would contradict Newtonian and general relativistic theories of gravity, I'm not sure what you're going for here...
 

Offline Ethos_

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #4 on: 18/04/2014 23:49:40 »
Does the spatial distance between individual particles have an effect on the strength of the gravitational field?
The gravitational field is so weak at this level that measuring any appreciable difference relative to separation of distance would be virtually undetectable.
« Last Edit: 19/04/2014 13:51:09 by Ethos_ »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #5 on: 19/04/2014 00:04:34 »
Does the spatial distance between individual particles have an effect on the strength of the gravitational field?

Yes, according to Newton, Einstein and actual measurement.

What's to debate?
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #6 on: 19/04/2014 01:18:06 »
Does the spatial distance between individual particles have an effect on the strength of the gravitational field?
The gravitational field is so weak at this level that measuring any appreciable difference relative to separation of distance would be undetectable even if it existed.

As gravitation is caused by mass then it must exist on the particle scale.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #7 on: 19/04/2014 01:19:31 »
Does the spatial distance between individual particles have an effect on the strength of the gravitational field?

Yes, according to Newton, Einstein and actual measurement.

What's to debate?

There is always a reason for the questions I ask although not necessarily the reasons one may assume.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #8 on: 19/04/2014 16:45:12 »
OK now that has been said let's look instead at atoms instead of particles, which will make more sense. In any system, whether solid, liquid or gas we can treat each atom as a self contained system that has its own centre of gravity. The contributions to feedback are therefore the sum of each atom's individual contribution at the distance to its centre of gravity from any point P. The sum of these and therefore the limit was determined to be 2. This is treated as a constant. Any difference in density and therefore the relative distance of individual atoms must modify this factor.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #9 on: 22/04/2014 23:39:54 »
0.02/c = 6.6712819E-11 and is a baseline value for G which does not take into account the density of a mass. The factor for varying density needs to be worked out from mathematical manipulation (differentiation of point mass sources over relative distances).
 

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #9 on: 22/04/2014 23:39:54 »

 

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