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Author Topic: Einstein and the Atom Bomb  (Read 49404 times)

Offline Ray hinton

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #50 on: 30/01/2006 22:20:21 »
The SR71 was developed in almost total secrecy, as was the F117,and a few other things to boot.
there are a few places in the US that the public are kept well away from,ie area 51/groome lake, and no im not gonna start on about aliens and all that crap,but what a good way of covering up testing on secret new aircraft and weapons,any one that sees an odd shape in the sky (F117)thinks they have seen an alien craft,and reports it as such.
As for the bomb,you can find out all you need to build one on the internet,getting the materials may be a bit difficult,they havent opened a "H BOMBS-R-US" yet.
Best thing to come out of the U S,beef jerky,the peppered one mmmmmmmmmm !

every village has one !
 

Offline thayo

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #51 on: 16/04/2006 00:55:36 »
omnipotentone, can you assist me get the 100suns. or his anyone there with a more comprehensive book on this.

lets keep trying the untried since the birth of science innovations have been like  toy but their impacts have rocked the world
 

Offline signalz

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #52 on: 09/07/2006 19:03:29 »
Japan never surrendered because of the Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima or the Plutonium bomb dropped on Nagasaki.  Japan surrendered because its "Ace in the Hole" ceased to exist.  This "Ace" was the Large intact army still on the Asian mainland.  This huge well trained army was to be brought back to Japan to defend the Islands.  About the time that the bombs were dropped the Russian Army more than decimated the whole Japanese army there.  Understand that the Russian army that attacked the Japanese army were the same hardened heavy tank lead armies that had just left Germany.  The Japanese never stood a chance against this force. When their army was gone the Japanese for sure knew the Jig was up.

The Japanses Army was never designed to fight "set piece" ETO battles.  

Matriculation level history classes never teach that the bombs stopped the war.  

Dang; Another American legend shot down. But hey, we broke the Japanese naval codes!

Hey, I understand that Churchill was willing to fight to the last American.

Just Kidding.  Love you Brits and Canuks
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #53 on: 03/08/2006 06:30:23 »
I am sure a famous women scientist was involved in developing this. She was working with splitting the atom or something along those lines. She was a jewish girl in germany and had to flee because of the nazis but continued her work in sweden or holland or something. I can't remember her name damit. Please anyone help.
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #54 on: 03/08/2006 19:46:52 »
I think you may mean Marie Curie

Michael
« Last Edit: 03/08/2006 19:48:16 by ukmicky »
 

Offline Grecian

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #55 on: 03/08/2006 20:38:17 »
Signalz - Certainly the Russian declaration of war affected Japanese thinking about surrender, but there really wasn't time for much Russo-Japanese fighting.
The Hiroshima bomb was 6th August, the Russian declaration of war was 8th Aug. and the Nagasaki bomb and the Russian move into Manchuria on 9th Aug.
It was on 9th Aug. in a Japanese cabinet meeting attended by the Emperor that the Emperor came down so heavily in the split cabinet on the side of those wanting to surrender that the whole cabinet agreed to a 'meeting of the elders' at which the final surrender decision was made on 14th Aug..
So the Russians didn't have time to do much fighting, but the fact that they had started may have tipped the balance in the Emperor's mind. A bit like the U.S.A in the First World War - just kidding.

Helena.




« Last Edit: 03/08/2006 20:39:44 by Grecian »
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #56 on: 04/08/2006 02:00:16 »
It isn't marie curie that I mean. Marie and Pierre Curie worked with radioactivity and discovered Pollonium and Radium. I know all about her. This person I am talking about is young in the 1930s and Marie Curie wouldn't have been.
 

Offline Darius

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #57 on: 18/08/2006 03:04:02 »
quote:
Originally posted by chris

Is that they Royal "WE", or have you forgeten who really cracked he enigma code ?

Chris

"I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception"
 - Groucho Marx



Hey Chris,

It amazes me that so many people still don't know the actual sequence of events which led to the cracking the ENIGMA code.  I could understand how this was possible until the late 80's with the Cold War and all, but today with much of the information no longer secret and with the British government officially recognizing the Polish accomplishments from 1933 to 1939, I thought the historical record would be corrected once and for all.

If you are interested in this subject check out this academic paper on the subject:

newbielink:http://ece.gmu.edu/courses/ECE543/viewgraphs_F03/EUROCRYPT_2003.pdf [nonactive]

Very thorough and great references.  Also, see:

W. Kozaczuk, Jerzy Straszak, Enigma: How the Poles Broke the Nazi Code, Hippocrene Books, 2004, ISBN 078180941X, and

newbielink:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptanalysis_of_the_Enigma [nonactive]

amongst many sources on the web.

Darius
 

Offline eric l

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #58 on: 18/08/2006 12:59:33 »
quote:
Originally posted by Mjhavok

I am sure a famous women scientist was involved in developing this. She was working with splitting the atom or something along those lines. She was a jewish girl in germany and had to flee because of the nazis but continued her work in sweden or holland or something. I can't remember her name damit. Please anyone help.


I think it's Lise Meitner you have in mind, although she was not exactly a young girl in the 1930's.  For details about Meitner :  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lise_Meitner.
Marie Curie (mentioned by ukmickey)was indeed older (but only some 10 years) but she was Polish, not Jewish and never worked in Germany.
« Last Edit: 18/08/2006 13:02:59 by eric l »
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #59 on: 18/08/2006 17:56:49 »
This could be it eric. I will do some reading.
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #60 on: 18/08/2006 19:18:23 »
Lise Meitner is the person. Thanks eric.

I found out about her when I watched a documentary called " E=mc2 - Einstein and the Worlds Most Famous Equation ".

You are right about her not being as young as I thought. She would have been 52 in 1930.

- Steven
 

Offline signalz

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #61 on: 21/08/2006 04:43:20 »
Grecian;
True, Russia didn't have much time. Starting on 9 August 1st,2nd & 3rd FEAG  (Far Eastern Army Group) and the 6th Guards Tank Army encircled the Kwantung Army. Japanese resistance collapsed on the 13th it was a done deal.  Japan Surrendered the next day.

France & England carried the weight in WW I.  The American commitment was small comparatively. The diff. was America was everything that was needed by the Allies at the 11th hour and prevented a stalemate.  (Which may have prevented WW II).  

Sorry if I offended with the "kidding"    We don't have a history to admire, (too short) so we have to admire yours.
 

Offline bostjan

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #62 on: 12/09/2006 19:12:37 »
Einstein had nothing to do with the manhattan project that designed the bomb.  Oppenheimer headed the project.  Other noted scientists who took part: Ed Teller, Richard Feynman, Hans Bethe, Glenn Seaborg, David Bohm, Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard, etc.

Alexander Stepanovich Popov invented radio in 1895 in St. Petersburg, Russia, before Telsa or Marconi.  Almost everyone has forgotten about him outside of the Slavic world.  Marconi read Popov's papers, so it seems apparent that he got the idea from Popov.  Several other inventors in the late 1890's claimed to invent the radio independantly.
 

Offline kalimna

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #63 on: 13/12/2006 18:34:35 »
WRT the "100 Suns" queries - I have this book, and whilst it gives a little detail on the explosive testing and related info, it is primarily a photographic record of the American tests. There are some truly stunning photo's in there, especially once you sidetrack the subject matter. Of two that particularly stand out, one is from essentially the moment of detonation and the expanding fireball that hasnt yet engulfed the tower holding the device (incredible surface patterning of the eplosing cloud), and a second shows a line of soldiers in a trench with motion-blurred white specks all over the photographic plate. The specks were radioactive fallout marking the film as the shot was taken. Quite scary.

Anyhoo, thats all I have right now.

Adam
 

Offline JimBob

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #64 on: 21/12/2006 01:48:40 »
Acting on Einstein's advice (he was ill at the time) Edward Teller authored a letter to President Roosevelt strongly advised not to build the bomb.

 

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Re: Einstein and the Atom Bomb
« Reply #64 on: 21/12/2006 01:48:40 »

 

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