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Author Topic: Has Einstein been misrepresented?  (Read 1530 times)

Online jeffreyH

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Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« on: 05/05/2014 17:10:59 »
In the vicinity of a spherical object we can say that there is curvature to spacetime. However in the case of a cubic object this will not be true. Is Einstein being misrepresented by focusing solely on spacetime curvature?


 

Offline burning

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Re: Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« Reply #1 on: 05/05/2014 19:19:08 »
However in the case of a cubic object this will not be true.

Why not?
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« Reply #2 on: 05/05/2014 21:23:27 »
The stronger components of the field are expressed at the surface. While from the centre of gravity there will be a tendency to produce a spherical field this weakens with distance so a flat field geometry will dominate although with a degree of curvature causing distortions. Much like on the surface of the earth local geometry appears flat. Extend that flatness across the plane of a cube and the field will flatten.
 

Offline burning

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Re: Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« Reply #3 on: 06/05/2014 15:10:44 »
It may flatten, but it will not be perfectly flat.  Sure, over short distances it may need an impractically high level of precision to detect any tidal gradient, but that's true near Earth's surface as well.
 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« Reply #4 on: 06/05/2014 18:28:19 »
It may flatten, but it will not be perfectly flat.  Sure, over short distances it may need an impractically high level of precision to detect any tidal gradient, but that's true near Earth's surface as well.

Well actually I was wrong. On another thread I picked up again on Lorentz Ether Theory. That prompted me to look again at gravitational fields and they won't actually flatten. They may appear flat but the curvature is still prominent. There are some insights I have gained which I can't discuss here.
 

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Re: Has Einstein been misrepresented?
« Reply #4 on: 06/05/2014 18:28:19 »

 

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