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Author Topic: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?  (Read 20826 times)

Offline profound

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Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« on: 10/05/2014 23:58:52 »
A researcher discovered that the malaria parasite is weakened when exposed to a changing magnetic field.

It is thought that the parasite which ingests heme/iron has it "bowels" ruptured when the changing magnetic field causes the stored/ingested heme crystals to be shaken about.A crude analogy is if you swallow a iron nail or bolt and then have a magnetic field applied to you that iron item is going to be shaken about and if it is in your bowels and ruptured the iron starts to poison you.

I quote from the research paper:-
"The researchers proposed that this may occur because the applied magnetic field prevents hemozoin
from being formed and free heme is free in the body of the parasite. Conversely, they suggest
that it is possible that the alternating magnetic field rotates the entire hemozoin crystal causing
mechanical damage to the late stage parasites".

Large amounts of iron is toxic to humans and causes organ failure.witness an iron nail and how quickly it rusts in salty water.the human body is full of salty electrolytes.



    Henry Lai, UW research professor of bioengineering, says the malaria parasite Plasmodium appears to lose vigor and can die when exposed to oscillating magnetic fields, which Lai thinks may cause tiny iron-containing particles inside the parasite to move in ways that damage the organism.

    “If further studies confirm our findings and their application in animals and people, this would be an inexpensive and simple way to treat a disease that affects 500 million people every year, almost all in third-world countries,” Lai said. According to the World Health Organization, as many as 2.7 million people die of malaria every year. Approximately 1 million of those are children.



http://www.washington.edu/news/2000/03/30/magnetic-fields-may-hold-key-to-malaria-treatment-uw-researchers-find/

This was discovered in year 2000.

Nothing happened for the next 8 years.The wheels of progress are very slow where blacks are concerned.

IN 2008 a patent was published and more experiments done confirming the above.
The patent is full of details and methodology.

Here it is:-

http://www.phys.cwru.edu/undergrad/Senior%20Projects/papers/papers2011/Thompson_Brown_2011%20S.pdf

you can download it free and view it properly.


Then in 2011 a follow up experiment was done by:-

Mary Thompson, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University
Dr. Robert Brown, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University
Dr. Brian Grimberg, Center for Global Health and Disease, CWRU School of Medicine

They published an 18 page experiment report.

it essentially confirmed the 2000 and 2008 experiments that relatively weak oscillating magnetic fields cause weakening of the malaria parasite.

I suggest you read it 3 times at least.You can free download it here:-

www.phys.cwru.edu...

It is a scientific paper with full details.


Then in 2012 someone built a Malaria Machine and took it to Ghana.Ghana is a country in Africa.

For some strange reason they reported their results in a blog post here:-

http://health-and-politics.blogspot.co.uk/2010/01/health-great-malaria-frequency.html?showComment=1394838008588#c4850460281957899246
« Last Edit: 11/05/2014 11:39:46 by profound »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #1 on: 11/05/2014 03:13:28 »
It sounds like a degausser...  as used for erasing magnetic media, as well as using to remove magnetic fields from CRTs.
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #2 on: 11/05/2014 05:07:13 »
The Bill & Melinda Gates foundation have donated $millions to curing malaria (because noone would cure malaria for a profit).

If degaussing worked on malaria, I am sure they would investigate it.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #3 on: 11/05/2014 07:27:10 »
[MOD Note: Most of your links are broken.  Did you copy/paste from elsewhere?  Generally original content is preferred on this site.  If it is not your writing, then it should be identified as such.]

A large number of the Malaria cases are self limiting, and adults that have had multiple previous infections may acquire some immunity.  There may also be some crossover of naturally acquired immunity between different strains. 

Any test should have a blinded randomized controlled clinical trial.  In this case, both groups probably should be treated with the "cage", but only one group would have it turned on.  The last link you included seemed to indicate the trial with only an experimental group, and no control group.

As with many things, magnetic field intensity drops off with the square of the distance.  The notes indicate a weak magnetic field, but the apparatus depicted appears like it would deliver a very weak field.

Is there a frequency that is used?  50/60 HZ, or something different?

One could get a much stronger magnetic field with an MRI machine, but perhaps the scan frequency would have to be adjusted, and it is not focused on the whole body at once.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #4 on: 11/05/2014 10:12:27 »
This reminds me of the fraudulent "zapper" devices , (which claim to treat parasites) ...

Quote from: quackwatch.com
Clark's "Zapper" is a low-voltage device that supposedly kills parasites, bacteria, and viruses with electrical energy, but does not harm human tissue. Its use is based on Clark's notion that all living things broadcast a characteristic range of radio frequencies and that the device can issue counter-frequencies that kill unwanted organisms. Neither device has any genuine diagnostic or therapeutic value.
http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Cancer/clark.html

Yes high electric field can destroy parasites , but the field strength required would kill the host.  It's like saying if you boiled the patient it will destroy their parasites , which is true.

Re: Westerners applying fringe "medicine" to people in rural Africa see ...
http://www.nation.co.ke/News/Malaria%20drug%20endangers%20Kenyan%20lives%20/-/1056/1012418/-/11e26ja/-/
« Last Edit: 11/05/2014 10:37:22 by RD »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #5 on: 11/05/2014 11:07:05 »
"It is thought that the parasite which ingests heme/iron has it "bowels" ruptured when the changing magnetic field causes the stored/ingested heme crystals to be shaken about."
By whom is that thought, and do they know that heme isn't magnetic?
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #6 on: 11/05/2014 11:46:05 »
[MOD Note: Most of your links are broken.  Did you copy/paste from elsewhere?  Generally original content is preferred on this site.  If it is not your writing, then it should be identified as such.]

A large number of the Malaria cases are self limiting, and adults that have had multiple previous infections may acquire some immunity.  There may also be some crossover of naturally acquired immunity between different strains. 

Any test should have a blinded randomized controlled clinical trial.  In this case, both groups probably should be treated with the "cage", but only one group would have it turned on.  The last link you included seemed to indicate the trial with only an experimental group, and no control group.

As with many things, magnetic field intensity drops off with the square of the distance.  The notes indicate a weak magnetic field, but the apparatus depicted appears like it would deliver a very weak field.

Is there a frequency that is used?  50/60 HZ, or something different?

One could get a much stronger magnetic field with an MRI machine, but perhaps the scan frequency would have to be adjusted, and it is not focused on the whole body at once.
All the links have been fixed.

The fields used are not very much stronger than the Earths magnetic field.

The frequencies experiment with were from 5 hertz to 15 hertz and from 1000 hertz to 1015 hertz.the higher frequencies seemed better but a lot depends on the configuration of the coils and what stage of the malaria parasites reproductive stage the field is applied.

full details of the method in depth are here:-

https://www.google.nl/patents/US20120130149

which goes into great depth and detail and can be downloaded.


The apparatus in the picture seems to be six horizontal square shaped coils acting as a solenoid or it could be 2 vertical helmholtz coils held together by the six horizontal frames.

high magnification /closer examination of the pictures indicates the former as the horizontal bars are much thicker and the wires seems to go into it from the main cable snaking its way to the other end it seems to branch off into each of the horizontal square frames.

The method seems to be instead of using a huge whole continuous solenoid enclosing the person they have used segments of a solenoid instead.

i would much rather they used 2 vertical helmholtz coils instead as it would be simpler and cheaper due to fewer parts...



https://www.google.com/patents/EP2355900A1?cl=en
« Last Edit: 11/05/2014 12:11:39 by profound »
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #7 on: 11/05/2014 12:13:21 »
"It is thought that the parasite which ingests heme/iron has it "bowels" ruptured when the changing magnetic field causes the stored/ingested heme crystals to be shaken about."
By whom is that thought, and do they know that heme isn't magnetic?


2. Description of the Related Art

Malaria affects millions of people all over the world. Upon infecting a red blood cell, the malaria parasite feeds on hemoglobin (Hb) and breaks the Hb down inside a food vacuole in the parasite. The heme part of Hb is called ferritoprotoporphin IX (abbreviated as Fe(III)PPIX); and cannot be digested by the parasite. The parasite transforms the Fe(III)PPIX into crystalline stacks called hemozoin. Hemozoin is a crystalline dimer of Fe(III)PPIX with a well defined crystalline structure which can be described as lath-like. These crystals in the vacuole of the parasite are typically close to 1 micron (μm, 1 μm=10−6 meters) in length and several hundred nanometers (nm, 1 nm=10−9 meters) in width. The magnetic susceptibility of hemozoin varies depending on the nature of the solution in which it is found; but, the resulting magnetic moment is generally within 1 to 5 Bohr magneton, which makes hemozoin super-paramagnetic. Magnetic susceptibility indicates the tendency of magnetic dipoles in a material to align in response to an externally applied magnetic field. The resulting alignment causes the material to behave as a small magnet that experiences a force depending on the magnet's orientation relative to the externally applied magnetic field.

Low frequency oscillating magnetic fields have been shown to cause mechanical torsion of hemozoin within red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite (J. E. Feagan, M. A. W. Wurscher, C. Ramon, H. Lai, “Magnetic fields and Malaria,” Biologic Effects of Light: Proceedings of the Biologic Effects of Light Symposium, Hlick, M. F. and Jung, E. G. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Hingham, M A, pp 343-349, 1999). According to Feagan et al., the mechanical torsion is sufficient to cause membrane disruption inside the parasite cell and hence the destruction of the parasite. Alternatively, the authors suggested that beside mechanical disruption of parasitic membranes, the applied magnetic field also inhibited the biopolymerization of heme, thus imposing the toxic effect of heme on the parasite and causing its death. After 24 hour exposure to an alternating magnetic field of 15 Gauss (Gs) at 5 cycles per second (Hertz, Hz) the level of parasite in culture was reduced to a range from about 70% to about 33% of the level in untreated control samples.
« Last Edit: 11/05/2014 12:16:00 by profound »
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #8 on: 11/05/2014 19:21:00 »
full details of the method in depth are here:-

https://www.google.nl/patents/US20120130149

NB: just because a patent exists doesn't mean the apparatus actually works,
e.g. https://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/museum/patents.htm

... After 24 hour exposure to an alternating magnetic field of 15 Gauss (Gs) ...

An MRI machine has a field strength over a million times that ,
any cases of malaria being cured by being in an MRI ? 

[ the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream ]
« Last Edit: 11/05/2014 21:53:13 by RD »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #9 on: 11/05/2014 19:53:59 »
"The magnetic susceptibility of hemozoin varies depending on the nature of the solution in which it is found; but, the resulting magnetic moment is generally within 1 to 5 Bohr magneton, "

Roughly the same as hemoglobin in blood.
I'm still not convinced
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #10 on: 11/05/2014 22:31:03 »
"The magnetic susceptibility of hemozoin varies depending on the nature of the solution in which it is found; but, the resulting magnetic moment is generally within 1 to 5 Bohr magneton, "

Roughly the same as hemoglobin in blood.
I'm still not convinced
Me neither. A single electron's spin magnetic moment is 1 Bohr magneton...
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #11 on: 12/05/2014 08:09:10 »
full details of the method in depth are here:-

https://www.google.nl/patents/US20120130149

NB: just because a patent exists doesn't mean the apparatus actually works,
e.g. https://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/museum/patents.htm

... After 24 hour exposure to an alternating magnetic field of 15 Gauss (Gs) ...

An MRI machine has a field strength over a million times that ,
any cases of malaria being cured by being in an MRI ? 

[ the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream ]


Did you even read the patent?
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #12 on: 12/05/2014 09:12:32 »
« Last Edit: 12/05/2014 10:16:28 by RD »
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #13 on: 12/05/2014 16:47:29 »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #14 on: 12/05/2014 17:37:23 »
what has that got to with it?
You can start with a hypothesis.  Perhaps cite some anecdotes.  But, then one needs to progress with the double blind study, hopefully designed in a way that patients would not be harmed by the experimental protocol. 

As I mentioned earlier, it would be easy enough to select a large number of patients.  All would be put in the cage, some receiving the "treatment", others just sitting in the cage without treatment, perhaps hearing a soft buzzer to indicate that the machine is "working".  All patients should also receive the "standard care", at least during the early trials as it would be unethical to withhold potentially life saving medications.  Double blinding would be that the people administrating the test would be unaware of the actual configuration.

The notes I see indicate that the mortality rate for malaria has plummeted since the 1940's.  It is lowest for young adults, and they would be a good initial target group for the study.  99.9% of the patients should recover with the standard care.  The study would have to be huge to pick out some of the 0.1% mortality to statistical significance, but other measurements such as the rapidity of clearing from the blood would be useful. 

There is widespread Chloroquine resistance, and drugs alone may not be the only answer.

 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #15 on: 16/05/2014 18:10:05 »
The Bill & Melinda Gates foundation have donated $millions to curing malaria (because noone would cure malaria for a profit).

If degaussing worked on malaria, I am sure they would investigate it.


Why would they investigate it?
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #16 on: 16/05/2014 18:17:48 »
what has that got to with it?
You can start with a hypothesis.  Perhaps cite some anecdotes.  But, then one needs to progress with the double blind study, hopefully designed in a way that patients would not be harmed by the experimental protocol. 

As I mentioned earlier, it would be easy enough to select a large number of patients.  All would be put in the cage, some receiving the "treatment", others just sitting in the cage without treatment, perhaps hearing a soft buzzer to indicate that the machine is "working".  All patients should also receive the "standard care", at least during the early trials as it would be unethical to withhold potentially life saving medications.  Double blinding would be that the people administrating the test would be unaware of the actual configuration.

The notes I see indicate that the mortality rate for malaria has plummeted since the 1940's.  It is lowest for young adults, and they would be a good initial target group for the study.  99.9% of the patients should recover with the standard care.  The study would have to be huge to pick out some of the 0.1% mortality to statistical significance, but other measurements such as the rapidity of clearing from the blood would be useful. 

There is widespread Chloroquine resistance, and drugs alone may not be the only answer.



I did not start with a hypothesis at all.

I started with a research paper by Henry Lai, UW research professor of bioengineering, says the malaria parasite Plasmodium appears to lose vigor and can die when exposed to oscillating magnetic fields, which Lai thinks may cause tiny iron-containing particles inside the parasite to move in ways that damage the organism.

This was improved upon by

Plasmodium falciparum Response to Oscillating Weak Magnetic
Fields Mary Thompson, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University
Dr. Robert Brown, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University
Dr. Brian Grimberg, Center for Global Health and Disease, CWRU School of Medicine.

http://www.phys.cwru.edu/undergrad/Senior%20Projects/papers/papers2011/Thompson_Brown_2011%20S.pdf

The experiments were impressive and conclusive.

The patent came later by others with more experiments.

It is obvious that none of you actually bother to read anything or study anything that might strain you and have an MTV attention span response

It is also very concerning that
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #17 on: 16/05/2014 18:20:03 »
[ the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream ]

We also use three orthogonal oscillating magnetic fields, which should rip apart or boil anything with a significant susceptibility and a weak cell wall.  Worth a try.
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #18 on: 17/05/2014 12:45:40 »
[ the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream ]

We also use three orthogonal oscillating magnetic fields, which should rip apart or boil anything with a significant susceptibility and a weak cell wall.  Worth a try.

Why would VERY poor malaria patients go into a very expensive ,very specialized million $ MRI machine?.

They don't even have MRI machines.Do you know the running costs of these things?
The specialized personnel to operate them?

In any case the field required is quite weak compared to a MRI field...

Stronger fields above a certain strength in the research paper showed a weaker effect in the malaria parasite reproductive cycle.

"... the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream."

the parasite are not all traveling and there is no way they can travel fast enough in the body to simulate a 5 to 15 hertz oscillating magnetic field.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #19 on: 17/05/2014 13:32:05 »
[ the field in an MRI is constant, rather than alternating, but from the parasite's perspective the field will effectively be alternating as they change their orientation whilst travelling in the bloodstream ]

We also use three orthogonal oscillating magnetic fields, which should rip apart or boil anything with a significant susceptibility and a weak cell wall.  Worth a try.

Why would VERY poor malaria patients go into a very expensive ,very specialized million $ MRI machine?.

In any case the field required is quite weak compared to a MRI field...


the parasite are not all traveling and there is no way they can travel fast enough in the body to simulate a 5 to 15 hertz oscillating magnetic field.

I'm sure we would accept evidence of rich people with malaria getting cured by an MRI scan (for some other condition).
Why did you ask about poor ones?

From the point of view of a parasite tumbling in the blood stream there's going to be some component of that motion at about 5 to 15 Hz.

And this
"Stronger fields above a certain strength in the research paper showed a weaker effect in the malaria parasite reproductive cycle." rings alarm bells. Why does more equal less?
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #20 on: 17/05/2014 20:43:02 »
what has that got to with it?

That the human trials you report are apparently conducted by a follower* of "Dr" Hulda Clark who was a charlatan. [* her nephew ?]

... there is no way they can travel fast enough in the body to simulate a 5 to 15 hertz oscillating magnetic field.

Red Blood Cells are described here as rotating/flipping at 5 - 15 times per second.

Why would VERY poor malaria patients go into a very expensive ,very specialized million $ MRI machine?.

I'm not suggesting an MRI be used to treat malaria , just that it would be proof-of-concept if someone had been cured of malaria by being in an MRI machine.


[ UPDATE : the author of the blog you refer to is apparently David P. Amrein who owns a company bearing "Dr Clark"s name which has been prosecuted by the FTC for making unsubstantiated health claims ...

Quote from: quackwatch.org
The FTC's complaint names Dr. Clark Research Association (DCRA), a California corporation that uses a San Diego, California, address; Dr. Clark Behandlungzentrum GMbH, a company based in Munchenbuchsee, Switzerland, and doing business as Dr. Clark Zentrum (DCZ), and their owner, David P. Amrein
http://www.quackwatch.org/02ConsumerProtection/FTCActions/clarkassn.html
http://www.quackwatch.org/02ConsumerProtection/FTCActions/clarkcomplaint.html

Apparently not actually his "aunt Hulda"
« Last Edit: 18/05/2014 00:06:37 by RD »
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #21 on: 18/05/2014 00:28:23 »
And this
"Stronger fields above a certain strength in the research paper showed a weaker effect in the malaria parasite reproductive cycle." rings alarm bells. Why does more equal less?

Weaker=more effective, sounds like homoeopathy, or the electronic equivalent ...

Quote from: wikipedia.org/wiki/Hulda_Regehr_Clark
Homeography: According to Clark, a "new science ... which is the electronic analog of homeopathy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hulda_Regehr_Clark#Major_methods_and_topics
« Last Edit: 18/05/2014 00:32:27 by RD »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #22 on: 18/05/2014 04:24:47 »
Quote
the level of parasite in culture was reduced to a range from about 70% to about 33% of the level in untreated control samples

I am wary of claims that the level of parasite is reduced over 24 hours of treatment. The symptoms of malaria includes cycles of parasite population every 2-3 days. So if you only treat people when they are showing acute symptoms, you could almost expect the levels of infection to decline over the next 24 hours.

The goal of treatment is not just to reduce the level of parasites, but to eliminate them from the body. People who take preventative medication before and during their trip to a malaria-risk area sometimes come down with malaria soon after they stop taking the medication. It seems that the parasite is able to survive in one of its many life-cycle phases - until the medication is stopped, and the parasite takes over. This happened to one of my friends.
« Last Edit: 18/05/2014 10:57:55 by evan_au »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #23 on: 18/05/2014 08:21:50 »

Why would VERY poor malaria patients go into a very expensive ,very specialized million $ MRI machine?.

They don't even have MRI machines.Do you know the running costs of these things?
The specialized personnel to operate them?


Yes. I own two clinical MRI units and I know where every last penny goes!

If you ignore the very expensive and environmentally demanding homogenous static field, you are left with programmable orthogonal oscillating fields which can be used to investigate and optimise the treatment regime, and can be replicated at quite low cost in a mobile rig wherever they are needed.
 

Offline profound

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
« Reply #24 on: 18/05/2014 09:56:37 »

Why would VERY poor malaria patients go into a very expensive ,very specialized million $ MRI machine?.

They don't even have MRI machines.Do you know the running costs of these things?
The specialized personnel to operate them?


Yes. I own two clinical MRI units and I know where every last penny goes!

If you ignore the very expensive and environmentally demanding homogenous static field, you are left with programmable orthogonal oscillating fields which can be used to investigate and optimise the treatment regime, and can be replicated at quite low cost in a mobile rig wherever they are needed.

Did you look at the pictures close up,magnified?

the patent actually mentions experiments with orthogonal oscillating fields also.
 

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Re: Could This Machine Save Malaria Victims?
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