The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory  (Read 2052 times)

Offline dylan vidrine

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory
« on: 11/05/2014 20:27:33 »
If psychedelic drugs increase hormones in a specific area of the brain, which will cause only certain neurotransmitters to fire, if you were to temporarily remove the hormones all together, would it open the power of the conscious brain more?
   Certain “Drugs” (LSD, MDMA, DMT, Psilocin, etc.) will cause a “psychedelic trip”, which increases the Serotonin and Dopamine hormone levels, which the receptors for this are only active when in a psychoactive trance, in the mid-brain area. I think that if a chemical compound could be synthesized that would cancel out the Serotonin and Dopamine hormones (Including any other psychoactive hormones) that it could open more potential for the brain, giving humans complete access to the brain, in a conscious state.
   A “Lucid Dream”, which is a state an unconscious person can achieve when dreaming by realizing that they are dreaming, releases the same chemicals that can cause a “Psychoactive” state. This means that the effects of LSD and other synthesized drugs are naturally occurring. If these hormones can naturally occur and can be found in the brain, that means when they are increased in the brain in a conscious state, they will have the same effect (which is what gives psychedelic drugs their effects). I hypothesize that if the hormones were to be temporarily taken out of the picture, the part of the brain that contains the subconscious (which is responsible for all long term memories, and amounts to between 88 and 95 percent of the human brain. It is the part of the brain that takes EVERYTHING literally) could be accessed consciously, which would allow humans to obtain photographic memories when in the “reversed Psychoactive trip” state. This could lead to creating false memories, or even permanently deleting parts of someone’s past memories. This could help cure depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or any other memory/chemical based disorders. I think that if my hypothesis is correct, this could be a huge breakthrough in the medical field, but it would also have a risk of being abused and used for recreational purposes. If such a compound could be synthesized, it would need to be a Schedule 1 drug, under the psychedelic field.
     To test my theory I would need samples of, Lysergic acid diethylamide, Psilocybin and Psilocin, Dimethyltryptamine, MDMA (ecstasy), and 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamin. I would also need full access to a laboratory that has the clearance level to use and test the chemicals needed to make these substances. I would need skilled chemists who can synthesize all of these drugs. If such a compound could be created, I think it would be birthed from all of the chemicals needed to form said drugs.
     I plan on going deeper into my research later, when I have the time, and hope to publish a paper for Doctors or Chemists to critique.


This information was formulated purely from my own thoughts, please leave feedback.


 

Offline chiralSPO

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1867
  • Thanked: 143 times
    • View Profile
Re: The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory
« Reply #1 on: 12/05/2014 00:16:18 »
Many psychoactive drugs are either agonists (bind to receptor site to activate), antagonists (bind to receptor site without activation [block]) or allosteric modulators (bind to some other part of the receptor thereby changing the ability of the receptor to bind signalling molecules, or changing how much of an activating or deactivating effect there is when binding does happen).

Psychedelics like psilocin that bind to 5-HT2A receptors are serotonin agonists, but one of the prevailing theories on mechanism of action is that this is only the first part of a cascade of effects throughout the brain, ultimately decreasing effecting a GABAergic system that modulates the "echos" in the brain waves (not the best description, I know). Effectively, this does exactly what you are proposing: it increases the number of neurons that are talking to each other, and how much they are saying (but that doesn't mean that any of this information is meaningful). This mechanism has also been implicated in dream states and hallucinations induced by seizures.

I don't think there are any hormones or drugs that are antagonists to all the receptor in the brain, but even then, that would be terrible. Serotonin and dopamine are required for proper brain function, no neurotransmitters = no brain function. There are multiple receptors for each neurotransmitters, and each with their own function. As I mentioned before, psychedelic states can be induced either by enhancing some serotonin signalling pathways, or by inhibiting other pathways. Essentially changing the balance in any way leads to changes in brain function (though only some select changes are considered psychedelic)

I do think that it could be very interesting to study how drugs interact with memory. For instance, there are many commonly used diazapene-based drugs that are allosteric modulators of certain GABA pathways. All potentiating diazapenes cause varying amounts of relaxation, euphoria, dizziness, amnesia and sleepiness. There are a few that are particularly noted for their effect on memory formation (Midazolam, for instance). There are other drugs that have been found to increase the ability of people to remember things that happen while on the drug (especially when in the same intoxicated state). I do think this offers a tool to investigate the mechanisms of memory formation and recall on a chemical basis...
 

Offline dylan vidrine

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory
« Reply #2 on: 12/05/2014 00:58:47 »
Many psychoactive drugs are either agonists (bind to receptor site to activate), antagonists (bind to receptor site without activation [block]) or allosteric modulators (bind to some other part of the receptor thereby changing the ability of the receptor to bind signalling molecules, or changing how much of an activating or deactivating effect there is when binding does happen).

Psychedelics like psilocin that bind to 5-HT2A receptors are serotonin agonists, but one of the prevailing theories on mechanism of action is that this is only the first part of a cascade of effects throughout the brain, ultimately decreasing effecting a GABAergic system that modulates the "echos" in the brain waves (not the best description, I know). Effectively, this does exactly what you are proposing: it increases the number of neurons that are talking to each other, and how much they are saying (but that doesn't mean that any of this information is meaningful). This mechanism has also been implicated in dream states and hallucinations induced by seizures.

I don't think there are any hormones or drugs that are antagonists to all the receptor in the brain, but even then, that would be terrible. Serotonin and dopamine are required for proper brain function, no neurotransmitters = no brain function. There are multiple receptors for each neurotransmitters, and each with their own function. As I mentioned before, psychedelic states can be induced either by enhancing some serotonin signalling pathways, or by inhibiting other pathways. Essentially changing the balance in any way leads to changes in brain function (though only some select changes are considered psychedelic)

I do think that it could be very interesting to study how drugs interact with memory. For instance, there are many commonly used diazapene-based drugs that are allosteric modulators of certain GABA pathways. All potentiating diazapenes cause varying amounts of relaxation, euphoria, dizziness, amnesia and sleepiness. There are a few that are particularly noted for their effect on memory formation (Midazolam, for instance). There are other drugs that have been found to increase the ability of people to remember things that happen while on the drug (especially when in the same intoxicated state). I do think this offers a tool to investigate the mechanisms of memory formation and recall on a chemical basis...
So if I understand what you are saying correctly, if you completely remove Serotonin and dopamine all brain activity will cease. If this is true, what would occur if you increased the levels of these hormones substantially, but not enough to overload the brain? Would that just be like a normal level 5 trip, or could that possibly evoke a level 6 trip (which has never been recorded, but has potential to exist)? If I can find the right compound, could the effects of hyperactivity be achieved enough to obtain the state I described in my hypothesis?
 

Offline chiralSPO

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1867
  • Thanked: 143 times
    • View Profile
Re: The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory
« Reply #3 on: 15/05/2014 12:53:06 »
If only it were so simple. Unfortunately for anyone trying to study the brain (but very fortunate for everyone with a brain), the brain is unfathomably complex. I recommend you do a little more book research before refining your hypothesis.

Also an unfortunate truth about the research world: it is nearly impossible to get funding or permission to work with psychedelics (not even counting the complications involved with using human subjects). I know someone at a very prestigious university who went through the bother of obtaining genetically modified transparent fish with neurons that fluoresce when they fire, with the hope of studying their visual cortices. They wanted to compare brain activities of fish seeing real things versus hallucinating, but could not get permission to obtain any LSD (study would have required <1 mg) or other psychedelic agent...
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: The Reverse Psychedelic Trip Theory
« Reply #3 on: 15/05/2014 12:53:06 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length