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Author Topic: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?  (Read 4460 times)

Offline Grimbo

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why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« on: 22/05/2014 20:31:03 »
Teaching basic first aid to all surly must be in everyone's interest.
The only down side I can see is some other subject would need to be dropped. 


 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #1 on: 22/05/2014 20:58:59 »
"why do we not teach first-aid in schools? "
Probably because we don't expect children to make life and death decisions on behalf of others: we expect them to seek adult help on that.
However I'd be happy to see first aid taught to everyone when they reach voting age or whatever the locally defined age of "adulthood" is.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #2 on: 22/05/2014 23:06:55 »
We had health classes in high school, and I believe even earlier.  When I went to college, there was also a health requirement, although perhaps it has since been dropped. 

I've had basic first aid refreshers at most jobs I've worked.  I don't remember if it actually began in school.  I wasn't in Boy Scouts, but I think they also have first aid training.  Girl Scouts?

While I might not want a 12 yr old performing CPR, however, I'd rather have a 12 yr old than nobody. 

Anyway, I have no problem with teaching basic first aid to young kids, and by 16 or so, CPR should be included.
  • Assess Situation
  • Call for help
  • Control bleeding, check pulse & breathing, & etc
  • Basic cleaning of wounds, sterile, etc.
  • I don't think confined spaces was included in my first aid classes, but one should always keep in mind that one shouldn't put oneself life threatening danger
  • water rescue

I could imagine that a well designed course could be a lot of fun for kids.  By the time I was 10 or so, I had used my share of band-aids, and survived a few sprained ankles.  I can't imagine any harm of a little additional first aid training.

Anyway, one might not do a whole semester of first aid, but I could imagine squeezing about 4 hours a year into the schedule.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #3 on: 23/05/2014 02:22:03 »
By the time kids are old enough to play outside and unsupervised, they should be equipped to survive the experience. My St John's Ambulance First Aid book is dated when I was 11 years old and we certainly did some basic training at Cub camp when I was younger. We did Holger Nielsen artificial respiration at secondary school (a few years before Kiss of Life was introduced) and everyone was encouraged to take water lifesaving: it was considered a disgrace if anyone in the class couldn't swim by age 14, and at least half of us were expected to have a lifesaving badge by age 16. The target in the scientific civil service was 1 in 5 trained in CPR.     

Unlike history and Latin, first aid saves lives. Along with hygeine and survival, it should be the only compulsory subject in the curriculum.

we don't expect children to make life and death decisions on behalf of others: we expect them to seek adult help on that.

Very few adults are permitted to do that, and only in very limited circumstances - certainly not in the case of a single viable casualty. But everyone has a duty (which is expressed in law in some countries) to save life and relieve suffering. AFAIK this has no lower age limit but depends on competence. So why not instil a bit of competence in place of panic and incompetence?
« Last Edit: 23/05/2014 08:03:48 by alancalverd »
 

Offline Grimbo

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #4 on: 23/05/2014 10:17:45 »
we don't expect children to make life and death decisions on behalf of others: we expect them to seek adult help on that.

In an ideal world there would be an adult near by but its not.
So many young children have drowned through lack of basic knowledge by there playmates.
Also teaching first aid in school would also highlight the dangers and hopefully make them play
more safely.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #5 on: 24/05/2014 06:22:14 »
In an ideal world there would be an adult near by but its not.

Unless the nearby adult is the one that needs to be rescued. 

For children who are born to parents in their mid thirties, by the time the child is 20, their parents will be in their 50's, and depending on lifestyle and genetics, could be at risk for heart attacks.  And, of course, there are all the other accidents that can happen around the home, and with life in general.
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #6 on: 24/05/2014 19:46:35 »
The only down side I can see is some other subject would need to be dropped. 

No need to drop any other subject. Most of the time children spend in school is not spent on learning anything, or used on anything useful at all. Primary/elementary schools are >90% childminding service and <10% education. This can be seen when you look at Unschooling (e.g. the Sudbury Valley School) where children are quite deliberately not taught anything at all, and yet they end up with the same level of academic achievement by the time they leave school. Unschooling is an awful philosophy, but it serves to illustrate just how bad normal schools are. They are all p***ing children's potential up the wall.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #7 on: 25/05/2014 23:13:34 »
I certainly wouldn't say that everything in school is useless.  There is the basic Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic.  I believe social skills are also important.  As one gets further in school, there is learning about one's own country, as well as the world.  And, of course, HISTORY.  While history may not be the most vital thing in the world, there is the saying that if we don't understand our past, we're destined to repeat the same mistakes.

For those students that go to college, a lot is repeated in college, at a much higher intensity.  Yet, it would certainly be difficult without a solid foundation.

This is a science forum...  people don't just magically understand scientific concepts.  Or, perhaps for the younger students, developing a scientific curiosity.

First aid would certainly be part of learning about the human body.
 

Offline cheryl j

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #8 on: 26/05/2014 02:01:34 »
In Canada the Red Cross teaches it in a baby sitting course for kids eleven and older.
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #9 on: 26/05/2014 19:40:56 »
I certainly wouldn't say that everything in school is useless.

Nor would I, but the inefficiency of teaching there is appalling. There is plenty of room to add extra educational content to the curriculum and plenty of fake education that could be removed from it.

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There is the basic Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic.

Which most children could be fully on top of after only a couple of years of real education, without taking up any more of their time. Better methods exist for teaching it all, but they are not used in school because children have to be processed through a machine which does not want to advance them faster than the ancient schedule they began with in the distant past. Everything is designed to hold them at certain levels instead of moving them on.

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I believe social skills are also important.

Schools generate astronomical quantities of antisocial children, so they really should stop posing as builders of social skills (which is something children actually gain from normal life outside of school).

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As one gets further in school, there is learning about one's own country, as well as the world.  And, of course, HISTORY.  While history may not be the most vital thing in the world, there is the saying that if we don't understand our past, we're destined to repeat the same mistakes.

Children learn very little real history in school, and what they do learn is generally the least important stuff, distorted to meet various political ends. The real stuff that they learn is for the most part picked up by watching interesting TV documentaries. At the primary/elementary level, children rarely learn anything at all that they don't already know from watching TV.

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For those students that go to college, a lot is repeated in college, at a much higher intensity.  Yet, it would certainly be difficult without a solid foundation.

The key thing is to provide a solid foundation without wasting years of childhood doing it inefficiently and in the most boring ways that have ever been devised.

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This is a science forum...  people don't just magically understand scientific concepts.  Or, perhaps for the younger students, developing a scientific curiosity.

At no point have I attacked education. I'm all in favour of actual education, done efficiently without wasting children's time. What I object to is that we have actually built suffocating childminding institutions which destroy childhood on the pretence that they are educating children. They do just about enough educating to maintain the illusion that they are doing a reasonable job, but only to those who don't know what children are actually capable of. If you do understand how fantastic children's real capabilities are, it is impossible to look on today's schools favourably. They are highly destructive and generate far more problems for society than they solve. The key point you need to understand is that Unschooled children achieve the same academic results as schooled ones, and that would not be possible if schools were doing the job properly because the Unschooling movement is wasting childrens potential to a degree that horrifies me.

What I want to see is all children being given access to real education, but without them being locked into systems which they cannot control. If you are stuck in a class with a useless teacher, you should be allowed to walk out and find a class with a better teacher or find a way to learn the same things independently. I went to a school where 90% of the teachers were highly inadequate and 20% of those were useless. It was one of the best schools in Scotland. Most of the time we weren't being taught anything, and even when we were it was done extremely inefficiently. The standards of exams has officially gone up, but in reality it has either remained the same or gone down. There is no ambition in the system for real improvement. It's just a sausage machine, and the sausages it produces are less tasty than the ones that come from free range farms.
 

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Re: why do we not teach first-aid in schools?
« Reply #9 on: 26/05/2014 19:40:56 »

 

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