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Author Topic: How do stem cells work?  (Read 15682 times)

Offline unstman

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How do stem cells work?
« on: 23/08/2006 01:33:13 »
Q : Does a stem cell have DNA ?

Q. If so, what determines what type of cell it will be ?

Q. Where is the source in which stem cells are produced ? 

Q. What process, as mentioned, is involved as to what type of cell the stem cell will be?

Q. If stem cells are produced from one source/location in the body, what process is involved in determining what type of cell it would be, and what process is involved in the ' migration ', of such cells?

Q. Do organs produce their own stem cells/fully developed cells?

I know, lots of questions..but hey, am curious lol

David
« Last Edit: 14/06/2008 21:58:38 by chris »


 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: How do stem cells work?
« Reply #1 on: 24/08/2006 21:05:06 »

Stem cells are primitive cells that have the potential to develop into different types of cells. In embryos, these master cells develop into the 200 or so distinct cell types in the body; in adults they replenish existing cells when they wear out or are destroyed. Three types are recognized. Cells which have a total potential for body development (totipotent cells) are found in a ferti­lized egg. Pluripotent cells are a possible source of every type of cell or tissue in the body, apart from those needed to develop a foetus. Multipotent cells have restricted capabilities. Pluri­potent stem cells exist in a natural state in the embryo, but are also found in the foetus and umbilical cord. Certain multi po­tent stem cells are present in the adult body, such as the blood­forming cells in bone marrow.
Stem cell research offers fresh prospects for progress in treat­ing a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, spinal­cord injury, heart and brain disorders, and joint replacements. Adult stem cells have already been used successfully to treat some patients suffering from diabetes or heart disease. Stem cells from an individual, kept in storage, would be available for future use by that person if required, and thus could act as a natural 'body repair system'. Research using embryonic stem cells is highly controversial as it involves the creation and destruction of human embryos; such research is banned in some countries, and in permissive countries is subject to strict controls. There are also difficult scientific questions to be answered, notably the effects of cell multiplication ('coloniza­tion') in different parts of the body, and exactly how the pro­cess works -whether stem cells form new tissue or improve the functioning of existing tissue.



Steven
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Offline Mjhavok

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Re: How do stem cells work?
« Reply #2 on: 24/08/2006 21:05:06 »

Stem cells are primitive cells that have the potential to develop into different types of cells. In embryos, these master cells develop into the 200 or so distinct cell types in the body; in adults they replenish existing cells when they wear out or are destroyed. Three types are recognized. Cells which have a total potential for body development (totipotent cells) are found in a ferti­lized egg. Pluripotent cells are a possible source of every type of cell or tissue in the body, apart from those needed to develop a foetus. Multipotent cells have restricted capabilities. Pluri­potent stem cells exist in a natural state in the embryo, but are also found in the foetus and umbilical cord. Certain multi po­tent stem cells are present in the adult body, such as the blood­forming cells in bone marrow.
Stem cell research offers fresh prospects for progress in treat­ing a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, spinal­cord injury, heart and brain disorders, and joint replacements. Adult stem cells have already been used successfully to treat some patients suffering from diabetes or heart disease. Stem cells from an individual, kept in storage, would be available for future use by that person if required, and thus could act as a natural 'body repair system'. Research using embryonic stem cells is highly controversial as it involves the creation and destruction of human embryos; such research is banned in some countries, and in permissive countries is subject to strict controls. There are also difficult scientific questions to be answered, notably the effects of cell multiplication ('coloniza­tion') in different parts of the body, and exactly how the pro­cess works -whether stem cells form new tissue or improve the functioning of existing tissue.



Steven
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In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: How do stem cells work?
« Reply #3 on: 05/09/2006 02:39:56 »
There has been tons done in the way of stem cell research and spianl cord injuries, their has actually been some limited success with the rebuilding of bone tissue ect. after injections of stem cells to the injured areas they are still working on it. Christopher reeves was deeply envolved in this research also!! Its been a year or so since I heard anymore, but do wonder how far they have come..

Karen
 

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Re: How do stem cells work?
« Reply #3 on: 05/09/2006 02:39:56 »

 

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