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Author Topic: What is the value of g at the Bohr radius of a hydrogen atom?  (Read 1305 times)

Online jeffreyH

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Is there a known value for g at the Bohr radius of a hydrogen atom?


 

Offline JP

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Yes and no. 

Yes because we can calculate it easily if we pretend the nucleus is classical, not a quantum object.  This should be a good approximation.  But I'm not sure there's any measurable consequence of this tiny force which will be dwarfed by electromagnetism at that distance.

No because no one knows how to get gravity to work on a quantum scale, so good luck computing gravitational effects due to quantum objects.  We also can't measure it to check, since it's so tiny compared to other effects.
 

Online jeffreyH

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Yes and no. 

Yes because we can calculate it easily if we pretend the nucleus is classical, not a quantum object.  This should be a good approximation.  But I'm not sure there's any measurable consequence of this tiny force which will be dwarfed by electromagnetism at that distance.

No because no one knows how to get gravity to work on a quantum scale, so good luck computing gravitational effects due to quantum objects.  We also can't measure it to check, since it's so tiny compared to other effects.

I like a challenge though. Good answer JP. I have a feeling that gravity may be weak because of the nature of its interactions so that we only see a fraction of it expressed at the surface of an object. It is not bi-polar like electromagnetism. This has implications.
 

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