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Author Topic: my project  (Read 3761 times)

Offline thayo

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my project
« on: 23/08/2006 03:56:10 »
Development of chips can be obtained from metals during machining operations. I am trying to employ the use of soyabeans oil, palm oil and groundnut as the cutting fluids, and studying the parameters such as chip velocity, chip compression ratio, shear velocity, depth of cut, e.t.c deduce their suitability as cutting fluids. I shall appreciate any directed at solving this scienticic mystery.
love u all

lets keep trying the untried since the birth of science innovations have been like  toy but their impacts have rocked the world


 

ROBERT

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Re: my project
« Reply #1 on: 23/08/2006 15:31:04 »
quote:
Originally posted by thayo

 I am trying to employ the use of soyabeans oil, palm oil and groundnut as the cutting fluids..
deduce their suitability as cutting fluids. I shall appreciate any directed at solving this scientific mystery.



This article on cutting oils may be of interest:-

" Mineral cutting oil (with no additives)
Suitable for low severity operations involving
mild steel, brass and light alloys.

Fatty oils
Oils derived from natural sources, e.g.
rapeseed oil, lard oil, are not now in general
use due to their short working life and
tendency to fume and give rise to rancid
odours.


Blends of mineral oil and fatty oil
Can be used as mineral oils as above, but
can give a better finish than straight mineral
oils, particularly when machining mild steel,
copper, aluminium and the harder types of
brass.

Blends of mineral oil and sulphurised
fatty oil
Products such as these, containing ‘inactive’
sulphur, are suitable for more arduous
machining operations, but do not readily stain
copper-based metals. "

www.blf.org.uk/static/Neat_Oils_FS_Page_02.pdf

Also see " United Soybean Board, Bio-cutting Oils, Metalworking lubricants."
http://www.unitedsoybean.org/what_nu_search.cfm?cat=Industrial%20Products&subcat=Metalworking%20Fluids
« Last Edit: 23/08/2006 15:45:09 by ROBERT »
 

Offline thayo

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Re: my project
« Reply #2 on: 24/08/2006 01:29:16 »
Robert, this kind of you, i still forward for more, i m going to start working on this. I have a limited time to conclude the stuff.
Cheers!

lets keep trying the untried since the birth of science innovations have been like  toy but their impacts have rocked the world
 

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: my project
« Reply #3 on: 23/08/2006 15:31:04 »
quote:
Originally posted by thayo

 I am trying to employ the use of soyabeans oil, palm oil and groundnut as the cutting fluids..
deduce their suitability as cutting fluids. I shall appreciate any directed at solving this scientific mystery.



This article on cutting oils may be of interest:-

" Mineral cutting oil (with no additives)
Suitable for low severity operations involving
mild steel, brass and light alloys.

Fatty oils
Oils derived from natural sources, e.g.
rapeseed oil, lard oil, are not now in general
use due to their short working life and
tendency to fume and give rise to rancid
odours.


Blends of mineral oil and fatty oil
Can be used as mineral oils as above, but
can give a better finish than straight mineral
oils, particularly when machining mild steel,
copper, aluminium and the harder types of
brass.

Blends of mineral oil and sulphurised
fatty oil
Products such as these, containing ‘inactive’
sulphur, are suitable for more arduous
machining operations, but do not readily stain
copper-based metals. "

www.blf.org.uk/static/Neat_Oils_FS_Page_02.pdf

Also see " United Soybean Board, Bio-cutting Oils, Metalworking lubricants."
http://www.unitedsoybean.org/what_nu_search.cfm?cat=Industrial%20Products&subcat=Metalworking%20Fluids
« Last Edit: 23/08/2006 15:45:09 by ROBERT »
 

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: my project
« Reply #4 on: 23/08/2006 15:31:04 »
quote:
Originally posted by thayo

 I am trying to employ the use of soyabeans oil, palm oil and groundnut as the cutting fluids..
deduce their suitability as cutting fluids. I shall appreciate any directed at solving this scientific mystery.



This article on cutting oils may be of interest:-

" Mineral cutting oil (with no additives)
Suitable for low severity operations involving
mild steel, brass and light alloys.

Fatty oils
Oils derived from natural sources, e.g.
rapeseed oil, lard oil, are not now in general
use due to their short working life and
tendency to fume and give rise to rancid
odours.


Blends of mineral oil and fatty oil
Can be used as mineral oils as above, but
can give a better finish than straight mineral
oils, particularly when machining mild steel,
copper, aluminium and the harder types of
brass.

Blends of mineral oil and sulphurised
fatty oil
Products such as these, containing ‘inactive’
sulphur, are suitable for more arduous
machining operations, but do not readily stain
copper-based metals. "

www.blf.org.uk/static/Neat_Oils_FS_Page_02.pdf

Also see " United Soybean Board, Bio-cutting Oils, Metalworking lubricants."
http://www.unitedsoybean.org/what_nu_search.cfm?cat=Industrial%20Products&subcat=Metalworking%20Fluids
« Last Edit: 23/08/2006 15:45:09 by ROBERT »
 

Offline thayo

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Re: my project
« Reply #5 on: 24/08/2006 01:29:16 »
Robert, this kind of you, i still forward for more, i m going to start working on this. I have a limited time to conclude the stuff.
Cheers!

lets keep trying the untried since the birth of science innovations have been like  toy but their impacts have rocked the world
 

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: my project
« Reply #6 on: 23/08/2006 15:31:04 »
quote:
Originally posted by thayo

 I am trying to employ the use of soyabeans oil, palm oil and groundnut as the cutting fluids..
deduce their suitability as cutting fluids. I shall appreciate any directed at solving this scientific mystery.



This article on cutting oils may be of interest:-

" Mineral cutting oil (with no additives)
Suitable for low severity operations involving
mild steel, brass and light alloys.

Fatty oils
Oils derived from natural sources, e.g.
rapeseed oil, lard oil, are not now in general
use due to their short working life and
tendency to fume and give rise to rancid
odours.


Blends of mineral oil and fatty oil
Can be used as mineral oils as above, but
can give a better finish than straight mineral
oils, particularly when machining mild steel,
copper, aluminium and the harder types of
brass.

Blends of mineral oil and sulphurised
fatty oil
Products such as these, containing ‘inactive’
sulphur, are suitable for more arduous
machining operations, but do not readily stain
copper-based metals. "

www.blf.org.uk/static/Neat_Oils_FS_Page_02.pdf

Also see " United Soybean Board, Bio-cutting Oils, Metalworking lubricants."
http://www.unitedsoybean.org/what_nu_search.cfm?cat=Industrial%20Products&subcat=Metalworking%20Fluids
« Last Edit: 23/08/2006 15:45:09 by ROBERT »
 

Offline thayo

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  • Posts: 226
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Re: my project
« Reply #7 on: 24/08/2006 01:29:16 »
Robert, this kind of you, i still forward for more, i m going to start working on this. I have a limited time to conclude the stuff.
Cheers!

lets keep trying the untried since the birth of science innovations have been like  toy but their impacts have rocked the world
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: my project
« Reply #7 on: 24/08/2006 01:29:16 »

 

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