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Author Topic: Can nothing exist?  (Read 9566 times)

Offline JP

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #25 on: 03/07/2014 16:41:37 »
Hi DM.

In what way can equal parts of matter and anti-matter be said to be nothing?

I look at it as a fine, equal balance. In our current model of particles and sub-particles, it is obvious that we have discovered (so far) that for every particle, there is another of an opposing force (don't take that literally).
Take quarks and antiquarks for example. Say you have a segment of space in perfect vacuum that consists of one up quark and one up antiquark. Although these elementary particles are present, their interactions cancel each other out. One could argue that their actual existence is null under these conditions.
Apply the overall idea of this to any situation- where there is a complete balance of matter and antimatter, quarks and antiquarks, etc. To me, 'nothing' would almost best be described as a complete balance between the known forces of the universe.

But this isn't true!  Antiparticles are "opposite" of particles in many, but not all ways.  For example, a photon is its own anti-particle, which is why we have electromagnetism as a force but not anti-electromagnetism.  Moreover, a particle and an antiparticle will annihilate when they collide, but they don't vanish into nothing.  This annihilation releases energy, so they don't really cancel out.
 

Offline Dark Matter

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #26 on: 03/07/2014 19:50:07 »

But this isn't true!  Antiparticles are "opposite" of particles in many, but not all ways.  For example, a photon is its own anti-particle, which is why we have electromagnetism as a force but not anti-electromagnetism.  Moreover, a particle and an antiparticle will annihilate when they collide, but they don't vanish into nothing.  This annihilation releases energy, so they don't really cancel out.

This was why I had said do not take that sentence literally. I am not arguing exact values of certain forces or particles, I am just providing a very broad definition of how I picture 'nothing" in hopes that another individual may take something from it.
While we can debate about semantics all day, it is abundantly clear that between antimatter and matter, our universe is dominated by matter, but not by very much (I am referring to the Charge Parity violation). The question remains, however: why does our universe display more matter than antimatter? What would actually exist if equal parts matter and antimatter composed our universe? My reasoning is based on the latter question.
 

Offline JP

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #27 on: 03/07/2014 20:08:09 »
Creative thinking is a great tool and I applaud you for thinking outside the box.  But this is a science forum and so ideas about how the universe works should have some relation to science.  We know that from observations what you're claiming simply isn't the case, so there isn't much in the way of science to be gained from thinking along those lines. 

I don't want to discourage you from asking interesting questions and thinking creatively, but science requires constantly checking one's creative ideas to see if they violate observed physical reality.
« Last Edit: 03/07/2014 21:02:01 by JP »
 

Offline Dark Matter

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #28 on: 03/07/2014 20:27:12 »

But this isn't true!  Antiparticles are "opposite" of particles in many, but not all ways.  For example, a photon is its own anti-particle, which is why we have electromagnetism as a force but not anti-electromagnetism.  Moreover, a particle and an antiparticle will annihilate when they collide, but they don't vanish into nothing.  This annihilation releases energy, so they don't really cancel out.


I don't want to discourage you from asking interesting questions and thinking creatively, but science requires constantly checking one's creative ideas to see if they violate observed physical reality.

I had no idea what kind of forum I was on, thanks for pointing that out, friend. I will refrain from any suggestions or new ideas as you undoubtedly have the superior intellect here.
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #29 on: 08/07/2014 14:19:42 »
Dark Matter - JP wasn't asserting a superior intellect, simply pointing out that this is a science forum and the idea you posted is unscientific, not least because it contradicts observations.

If you're going to get sniffy over a polite presentation of fact, you may find the science forum emotionally draining...

If you want to present a new theory, there's a forum for that here: New Theories, but you should expect any new theory posted to receive critical comment.

p.s. It would also help readability if you could sort out the quoting in your posts.
« Last Edit: 08/07/2014 14:23:48 by dlorde »
 

Offline Ethos_

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Re: Can nothing exist?
« Reply #30 on: 08/07/2014 23:46:48 »
Quote from: JP

There may not be "quantum foam" in the sense of how its used in theories of quantum gravity, but there are still fields in between particles, and those fields can be quantized and give rise to more virtual particles, so there is really nowhere in space that has "nothing."
Agreed JP,.....................There is no space empty of field! Therefore; Nothingness in our universe is impossible.
« Last Edit: 08/07/2014 23:48:21 by Ethos_ »
 

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Re: Can nothing exist?
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