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Author Topic: What is the best core material for a reciprocating electromagnet?  (Read 1872 times)

Offline Zombi

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I build reciprocating electromagnets using an iron core 1" to 1.25" in height and 5/16" to 3/8" diameter with a capacitor linking them, there's and armature bar and spring contact point system to make it reciprocate much like old doorbells. Is there a better core material I can use? And is there a better configuration for coils I can use to get the most out of this system where it will still function the way it's supposed to? I have included a pic so you can see what I'm using currently, must maintain a reasonable handheld weight, and withstand impact from the armature bar at the coil top unless there's a better way


 

Offline homebrewer

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Hello,

Many people here would be delighted to assist you in your project,
but you need to define the parameters you wish to improve.

Could this be perhaps to power of the grips, the frequency of
opening and closing of the same ?

Just a guess on my part ?
 

Offline Zombi

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Yes trying to get stronger magnetic pull at less voltage, and more consistency in the cyclic rate
 

Offline evan_au

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Quote from: Zombi
function the way it's supposed to
Unfortunately, it's not clear from the diagram what function this device is intended to achieve.

In paricular, I didn't see a battery:
  • Coils require electrical current to create a magnetic field.
  • Some of the electrical energy is lost in resistance of the copper windings.
  • More electrical energy is lost in hysteresis of the magnetic circuit every time the coil attracts the magnetic core and then releases it. (But a "soft" magnetic material will lose less energy on every magnetic cycle.)
  • More energy is lost in the inductive spike when the circuit stops supplying current to the coil.
  • So some energy source needs to be provided.
Please provide a written description of what the circuit is intended to achieve, and how it is intended to function, and we should be able to provide some more specific advice.
 

Offline Zombi

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Best and easiest description is it's a tattoo machine, it uses an ac to dc power converter with a clipcord, the armature bar pushes a needle bar down through a tube to insert pigment under the first few layers of the epidermis
 

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