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Author Topic: Is mass a field?  (Read 1362 times)

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Is mass a field?
« on: 22/07/2014 10:28:26 »
Mass Fields



When you accelerate a particle to nearly the speed of light it becomes more massive. The atom it self dost not get larger! Mass is just a field... That means that the very thing you think makes you solid is not.
AND And and.. :o

Another field gives rise to the effect of mass "The higgs boson" imagine space which is a 4 dimensional fabric, space has a bending property which allows space to bend around the nucleus and electrons of all atoms.

What ever may or may not be surely true.  truth to the fact remains the same, you can accelerate things to nearly the speed of 299 792 458 m / s and as you do so you can make objects more massive and thus produce more gravity.

Imagine if we could take something exotic like "super fluid" and spin it until it gets to nearly the speed of light. (if you don't know what super fluid is look at this video.)

By spinning the super fluid super fast you can make the helium atoms gain mass. more mass gives rise to more gravity and most importantly more momentum.

if you had a space ship already going some what fast, say 10% light speed, then made it more massive by spinning a super-fluid, would you have just made more kinetic energy out of thin air/space?  Imagine this if you put energy into throwing a baseball into space then all of a sudden the ball got more massive what would happen? would the ball slow down or would it go the same speed? then what would happen if you reduced it's mass after you made it more massive?


 

Offline JP

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Re: Is mass a field?
« Reply #1 on: 22/07/2014 14:53:06 »
No, mass is not a field, but fields can create mass: the Higgs field being the obvious one, but the strong nuclear force is mediated by a field which gives rise to much of the mass of a proton, for example. 

Since much of your post deals with your own ideas on mass and fields, I've moved it to New Theories.
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Is mass a field?
« Reply #2 on: 22/07/2014 22:45:09 »
SS, you mentioned spinning a superfluid.  How would that be done?  My (very limited) understanding is that a superfluid does not react to friction as other fluids do. 

When, for example, you stir your tea, the liquid in the cup quickly picks up the momentum of the stirring action and swirls round.  Superfluid, I understand, does not do this.   If you were able to stir a container of superfluid, all that would happen would be that a succession of vortices would form along the path of the stirring instrument; the body of the liquid would remain motionless.  More vigorous stirring would just lead to more, and perhaps larger, vortices.  The super fluidity would break down locally within each vortex, but would be retained by the liquid everywhere else. 

If this is the case, wouldn’t spinning a container of superfluid just cause vortices to form around the edge, if it had any effect at all?
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is mass a field?
« Reply #3 on: 24/07/2014 06:13:12 »
Bill S

You are right to think that stirring a super-fluid like any other liquid would do nothing, motion is not transferred by a stirring motion in a liquid which has no viscosity. But there are other ways to stir super-fluid, you can spin the stuff with electric and magnetic fields.

I simply used a super-fluid as an example.  If you were to rotate anything to near light speed with the least amount of energy then something like a super-fluid would be your best choice because ones you set it in motion it wont slow it self down do to friction and other factors.

I'm just saying "If" you had a magical centrifuge which could rotate a super-fluid to near light speed with electric or magnetic fields, then what would be the properties of such a device?

I Theorize that the super-fluid machine would have "gravitational effects" the device would get heavier and more massive the faster you spin the super-fluid And the device would be able to produce it's own highly condensed gravitational field (it would also twist the fabric of space into some sort of vortex because of the extreme spinning motion.)

This is all very hypothetical. I don't intend to make a super-fluid machine or use it (because it wouldn't work) I am just thinking, If I had a machine which could manipulate gravity then what would this machine be made of? what sort of properties would it have and how can it be practically used?

I thought.  ??? hmmm... It could spin something to near light speed, that would cause gravitational effects right?   :-\What would spin??
Perhaps a super-fluid because it has no viscosity, it could spin without slowing it self down.  good enough.

Next I thought  :P what could this thing do if it worked? well it would get heavier mainly... It would produce more gravity then normal... and.. maybe it could stir up space, it could twist space because of the motion of the high speed spinning.

Other then that I don't imagine it could do much else.

Well one has to think, what is this device good for? well imagine a scenario like this.

if your going fast in space you have a certain amount of KINETIC ENERGY traveling with you. Imagine you had 2 objects going at the same speed but one object has more mass then the other.

The smaller less massive object has less KINETIC energy then the bigger more massive object, even though they are going the same speed. But what if mass was not a fixed variable? What if you could increase or decrease your mass at will?

What if a massive object traveling at 99.9% light speed suddenly lost most of it's mass. Logically speaking the object should go faster (faster then light speed) because it's Kinetic energy has not changed but it's mass has, there for the law of conservation of energy states that you must go faster, if your mass suddenly increases then you should slow down as the Kinetic energy has not changed ONLY mass has changed.

If you had a ship in space and activated the super-fluid machine until it increased the mass of your ship by 2X then you accelerated your ship to near light speed 99.9% light speed then you turned off the mass machine and your ship lost half of it's mass logically speaking you should exceed the speed of light or at least go faster.
« Last Edit: 24/07/2014 06:20:50 by ScientificSorcerer »
 

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Re: Is mass a field?
« Reply #3 on: 24/07/2014 06:13:12 »

 

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