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Author Topic: Dead Zones  (Read 6659 times)

Offline lotusbunny

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Dead Zones
« on: 01/09/2006 19:50:44 »
Hi there!

I hope I don't sound too stupid, but I have a few questions and I wondered if anyone could shed any light on a matter for me?
I'm afraid I'm not the brightest thing on two legs but I do love hearing about scientific issues.

Anyway, has anyone read about the Dead zones in the Pacific off the coast of oregon? They say they may be caused by the climate changing the intensity of storms and dragging up deep deoxygenated sea water which causes an abundance of flora then bacteria which uses up all the oxygen.

I have been surfing around and noticed a few things about this that seems strange to me. I have put a list together when added up I wonder if there is more of a problem than stated.

1) The seismic activity of the region has increased
2) Volcanic activity releases methylbromide which can also disolve in oceanic water as well as stay in the atmosphere
3) The sea creatures that have died use bromid and would decompose it back into the sea.
4) sea going birds of the region have elevated bromide in their shells.
5) In humans bromide causes depression, the region of Oregon has 400% higher rate of young adult depressions than any state in America. Please don't quote me on the actual figure!

I haven't seen any data putting anything together on website, do you think they could have a problem or is it just my silly imagination.

Debs :)


 

Offline VAlibrarian

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Re: Dead Zones
« Reply #1 on: 04/09/2006 02:29:40 »
Debs-
I cannot speak with authority to the environmental event you describe on the West Coast of the USA. However, on the East Coast of the USA where I live we have a problem every summer with a dead zone that forms in the Chesapeake Bay. Several million people now live in the drainage basin of the Chesapeake Bay, and our activities result in the pouring of dissolved nitrates from sewage and agricultural manure runoff into the Bay. During the summer months, these nitrates cause very large algae blooms in the Bay. When this algae then dies, all the dissolved oxygen is eliminated in the central channel of the Bay, and all living things such as Blue Crabs and many species of fish then die. Shallower waters around the edge of the Bay and its tributary rivers are still able to support life.
I understand that we have also had dead zones form at the mouth of the Mississippi river in the Gulf of Mexico due to the same process of nitrate stimulated algae blooms.
I have no knowledge of the bromide volcanic syndrome on which you speculate. but on the East Coast and Gulf Coast, educated Americans are well aware of the role we play in damaging the estuary life that is the basis of our seafood industry, or used to be, anyway.

chris wiegard
 

Offline lotusbunny

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Re: Dead Zones
« Reply #2 on: 05/09/2006 08:25:03 »
Thanks Chris, for that info.

Seaweed produces methyl iodide which can react with seawater to produce methyl bromide. Different types of algae especially red algae contain methyl bromide which can be released into the atmosphere.
Alot of methyl bromide goes on to further react with seawater to make methyl choride, but some goes into the atmosphere as methylbromide.

Methyl bromide is also used widely as a fumigant and insecticide, which also causes the phytoplankton blooms.

I think that with the increased red variety of algae, and volcanic emmissions of methyl bromide, there could be a constant low level of of the substance damaging the health of the pacific west. There are some clusters of health problems that were reported to the CDC but generally not enough to get that noticed.

I'm still trying to get health stats from the area of the past 10 years.

I would expect cycles, especially in the summer of increased depression, stomach problems, eye infections, and asthma.

I don't think volcanoes are the chief cause of the problem but I think they could definately be adding to it.
I wanted to find a correlation of seismic activity to methyl bromide levels and the growth of red algae.

I can't find any reference to the type of algae that is causing the problem, or the bacteria that feeds on it.

Thanks again for your input. I would love to hear from people living around these nitrate dumping areas,plus anyone living near a volcano in these areas.

Debs:D
 

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Re: Dead Zones
« Reply #2 on: 05/09/2006 08:25:03 »

 

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