The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Could a free falling slinky be the key to detecting gravitational waves?  (Read 2637 times)

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3918
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
What if we were able to manufacture a slinky from nano materials have it held in place under tension and then let it drop. As the release of the stress propagates down the slinky gravity then takes over. If the material was thin enough would the effects of gravitational waves be somehow detectable?


 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11993
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Any measurement of a gravitational wave passing builds on you having your measuring equipment placed at a distance, relative what it measures on, then measuring a change in distance. like three satellites measuring the distances between them, and so also the space existing, placed as a 'fixed' triangle in space, expecting the distances (between satellites) to becoming slightly displaced as a gravitational wave pass. It's a SpaceTime propagation, as if we (and it) all would be the same 'material'. So even with those waves perfectly noticeable it shouldn't mean a thing to us as I understands it. Only someone at a distance would be able to define a 'distortion' passing, not the one involved in it, (thinking of the slinky there). so the question should be how you think to measure on it?
« Last Edit: 27/09/2014 14:21:03 by yor_on »
 

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3918
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
I don't have the answer. I was simply posing the question. I am not entirely sure about this but the release of tension should impart a greater downward momentum than gravity can exert on its own.
« Last Edit: 27/09/2014 17:59:36 by jeffreyH »
 

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3918
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
This can easily be detected by using a slow motion camera. Hold the slinky in one hand and the tennis ball in the other with the bottom of the ball at the same height as the top of the slinky in your hand. Film them both falling and see what happens. I don't think it will be what we expect. My bet is on the ball falling faster.
 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8126
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
... using a slow motion camera. Hold the slinky ... I don't think it will be what we expect.

« Last Edit: 27/09/2014 18:48:23 by RD »
 

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3918
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
... using a slow motion camera. Hold the slinky ... I don't think it will be what we expect.


If that is a falling slinky video I have already seen it. That is NOT what I mean.
 

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3918
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
Can the falling slinky gives us some insights into gravitational collapse? When a collapsing star initially experiences supernova two shock waves will propagate. One outward into space and the other inward towards the centre of gravity. This inward wave should have some part to play in the collapse. It must affect the electromagnetic field and may be the initiator to enable gravitation to exert more influence than other forces. Like the slinky, compression would propagate inwards from the surface and maybe the counter balance the falling density issue with increase of mass. If we take a spherical cap then any point central to the curved surface experiences an intensified gravitational field which then time dilates the area around this point. The collapse would appear to slow down to an external observer. As the compression moves inward just like the slinky it would not initially draw any matter from the central region of the mass. This may change as the collapse progresses. We can never determine this so I doubt if this could be established. In another post black hole formation was called into question. If surface compression acts in any way like the falling slinky then the conclusions of that research must be wrong.
 

Offline PmbPhy

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2762
  • Thanked: 38 times
    • View Profile
What if we were able to manufacture a slinky from nano materials have it held in place under tension and then let it drop. As the release of the stress propagates down the slinky gravity then takes over. If the material was thin enough would the effects of gravitational waves be somehow detectable?
Any object that has mass and moves in a way such that its distribution is a function of time will radiate gravitational waves. However they'll be far too small in magnitude to be detectable.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums