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Author Topic: What type of blood/genetic test can show the absence of alopecia in one's DNA?  (Read 1949 times)

Offline mriver8

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And how can one go about doing the test themself? Instructions please.
« Last Edit: 30/09/2014 23:24:53 by mriver8 »


 

Offline evan_au

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There are lots of causes of alopecia, not all of which are genetic.

The simplest genetic tests to conduct at home are:
(1) Are you a male? "Male pattern baldness" is far more common amongst males.
(2) Ask your mother: Were her brothers or father bald?

You can get a commercial genetic test, but analysis of SNPs is not a direct measure of the genes you have; and even then, it can at best indicate a probability of developing male-pattern baldness, since there are many factors involved.

The symptoms of male-pattern baldness start soon after puberty, where the hormonal changes put the hair follicles into overdrive, causing them to burn out early - but it only affects hair follicles on the front and top of the head.

There are apparently some treatments these days that have actually been demonstrated to change the progress of baldness - but there are far more treatments that make no difference. Indeed, this field has such a bad reputation that I understand that advertising of baldness cures in some countries was banned as a scam.

A visit to a hair loss clinic may be able to tell you if the process has started - or maybe they will just ask you spend a lot of money for no benefit...
 

Offline mriver8

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There are lots of causes of alopecia, not all of which are genetic.

The simplest genetic tests to conduct at home are:
(1) Are you a male? "Male pattern baldness" is far more common amongst males.
(2) Ask your mother: Were her brothers or father bald?

You can get a commercial genetic test, but analysis of SNPs is not a direct measure of the genes you have; and even then, it can at best indicate a probability of developing male-pattern baldness, since there are many factors involved.

The symptoms of male-pattern baldness start soon after puberty, where the hormonal changes put the hair follicles into overdrive, causing them to burn out early - but it only affects hair follicles on the front and top of the head.

There are apparently some treatments these days that have actually been demonstrated to change the progress of baldness - but there are far more treatments that make no difference. Indeed, this field has such a bad reputation that I understand that advertising of baldness cures in some countries was banned as a scam.

A visit to a hair loss clinic may be able to tell you if the process has started - or maybe they will just ask you spend a lot of money for no benefit...

No I wasn't balding until 32 when an FBI Agent said thet were going to and another one later claimed it wad ultrasound at Poplar Street and 29th Street Philadelphia, PA. In response to what you said no there are no bald relatives on either side. So I did research to find out if it were true and LOW and behold.
 

Offline mriver8

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Here also. I need to proove it in court because I filed a legal complaint.
 

Offline evan_au

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Alopecia refers to the loss of the fairly rugged external hair on the head or body. It may be more or less visible, depending on where it occurs. It sometimes grows back (eg following cancer treatment).

Those papers posted above refer to hearing loss caused by the destruction of the very fine hairs inside the cochlea (inner ear). It is invisible, except during a post-mortem, as these hairs are buried in the bones of your skull (or they may be temporarily exposed during surgery to instal a cochlear implant). These tiny hairs do not grow back once they have been broken off.

Is it possible that your legal case may have confused two quite different kinds of hair loss?
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ultrasound at Poplar Street and 29th Street Philadelphia, PA
What intense sources of ultrasound occur in the streets of Philadelphia?
You would need to be exposed to high levels for extended periods to cause hearing loss; I don't see how it could cause loss of body hair.

Your ears have an exquisite structure for efficiently transforming sound energy in the air to sound energy in the fluid of the cochlea, matching impedances along the way. External hairs have no such mechanism, and seem to me to be just too massive and too stiff to be affected by ultrasound.

 

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