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Author Topic: underground water  (Read 4186 times)

Offline realtree

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underground water
« on: 09/09/2006 01:45:18 »
hey there,
   let's say, the proverbial crap has hit the proverbial fan.
   asteroid, tsunami,  thermonuclear event, depleted oil reserves, whatever the apocolyptical flavor of the week is.
   obviously water is going to be the new gold standard.
   from an exclusively survival stand point. i.e.;  if i have water i can drink and eat.  where in the u.s., would be the best place to own property. hydrologically speaking.   a place with underground water obviously, in case of surface water contamination.


 

Offline Bass

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Re: underground water
« Reply #1 on: 10/09/2006 00:31:32 »
better yet- a place with artesian water

Subduction causes orogeny.
 

Offline realtree

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Re: underground water
« Reply #2 on: 10/09/2006 01:56:07 »
but of course.
when i was growing up we had an artesian well around the corner from us that the locals would frequent to embibe.
any way of locating artesian/potential artesian wells on a groundwater map?
also thanks for the reply.

waste not, lest ye waste yourselves.
 

another_someone

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Re: underground water
« Reply #3 on: 10/09/2006 02:02:46 »
I cannot see that the supply of water can be at all predictable in such cases.

Firstly, there is unlikely to be any real water shortage so long as 2/3rds of the Earth's surface is covered in the stuff.  The only real issue you would worry about is accessibility to drinkable water, and this depends upon what technology you have available to accessing or purifying water for drinking.  Will desalination be easier than drilling a well (after all, with any source of heat to boil water, and some simple pipes, one can fairly easily create a crude water distillery).

If one wants easy access to water that requires no technology whatsoever, then your only real option is river water; but with a major environmental upheaval, and a possible failure of human built river management systems, the likely courses of the rivers would, I would think, be highly unpredictable.



George
 

Offline realtree

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Re: underground water
« Reply #4 on: 10/09/2006 02:09:13 »
to true.
hadn't really thought that far ahead.  thank you.
are you in the u.k. then?  which region if you don't mind me asking?  my fathers people are from england, via scotland, via ireland, via pangea. or some such.


waste not, lest ye waste yourselves.
 

another_someone

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Re: underground water
« Reply #5 on: 10/09/2006 02:34:49 »
quote:
Originally posted by realtree
are you in the u.k. then?  which region if you don't mind me asking?  my fathers people are from england, via scotland, via ireland, via pangea. or some such.



South East of England, although my family are originally from Hungary, and before that, various parts of central Europe.



George
 

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Re: underground water
« Reply #5 on: 10/09/2006 02:34:49 »

 

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