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Author Topic: Hypothetically how could one female animal's DNA be used to produce a male?  (Read 1199 times)

Offline mriver8

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sibling that neither of her parents donate a sperm or egg for? Second how about a 3 parent embryo?
« Last Edit: 04/10/2014 10:06:13 by mriver8 »


 

Offline evan_au

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Hypothetically how could one female animal's DNA be used to produce a male?
In some fish species, this happens routinely, because gender is hormonally determined based on environmental cues, not genetic.

For humans, with X & Y sex-determining chromosomes, it is theoretically possible to create a female cell nucleus from a male cell: The Male has XY chromosomes, while the female has XX. With significant advances in nanosurgery, it may one day be possible to remove the Y chromosome from a male cell and replace it with an X chromosome from the same male, to produce a female.

To produce a male cell from a female cell would require generating the DNA code for the Y chromosome from the DNA blueprint stored on a computer. This technique has been demonstrated in viruses and bacteria.

At present, the environment to turn a cell nucleus into an adult requires the environment of an egg cell from a female.

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sibling that neither of her parents donate a sperm or egg for?
Dolly the sheep was cloned, which effectively made her the sibling (identical twin) of her genetic "mother". No sperm was involved, but it did involved inserting the DNA into an egg cell, and implanting it into another female sheep to grow to term.

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how about a 3 parent embryo?
I understand that there has been a debate in the past year in the UK about this.

One technique which has successfully been used to prevent passing on maternal mitochondrial diseases is to do in-vitro fertilisation using egg and sperm, and then to transfer the nucleus to an egg cell from a donor mother. In this case, the egg donor supplies the mitochondrial DNA, which is a small (but important) part of the cell's DNA.

Today, genetic manipulation is very risky; its use in humans would be considered unethical, unless it was the last chance to correct a fatal mutation.

I wonder how long it will be before the first baby is born whose characteristics were selected from a menu which contained the DNA variants of 10 or more parents?
 

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