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Author Topic: Could a declining sense of smell be a better predictor of mortality?  (Read 1121 times)

Offline evan_au

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A recent study showed that a poor sense of smell was a good predictor of mortality over the next 5 years, in older people (even better than a diagnosis of heart failure).

Some people have had a poor sense of smell for their whole lives.

This study looked at mortality 5 years after the initial smell test. It would be interesting to retest the survivors today, and see if a declining sense of smell could be an even stronger predictor of mortality in the subsequent 5 years?
« Last Edit: 04/10/2014 20:54:04 by evan_au »


 

Offline Ethos_

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A recent study showed that a poor sense of smell was a good predictor of mortality over the next 5 years, in older people (even better than a diagnosis of heart failure).

Some people have had a poor sense of smell for their whole lives.


It is also important to take into account where the individual has spent their working life. As a mechanic by trade, I've lost much of my sense of smell resulting from constant contact with gasoline. Over long time exposure to gasoline, the nerve endings in the nose become damaged causing diminished olfactory ability.
 

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