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Author Topic: Do gravitational waves need to be strong to generate lift?  (Read 882 times)

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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They have achieved levitation of objects using sound waves and reflected sound waves. At the point where the generated wave and the reflected wave cancel each other out a force is generated to lift an object. If we can generate gravitational waves and reflect the generated waves, could they be weak and still provide lift?  If so then a varying mass would flex the spacetime surface generating gravitational waves, if the earth acts as a natural reflector of weak gravitational waves, then we could calculate the intersection point and attempt to raise a mass at the point where the generated gravity wave cancels the reflected wave.



 

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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I know they are trying to detect let alone prove Einstein's theory about the existence of gravitational waves, but the use of the waves doesn't necessarily need the measurement of the waves.  We could use wave equations to mathematically calculate their generation and velocity, as well as that of reflected gravitational waves, without being able to sense them directly.  The sense of the presence of their existence might only come from effects at the predicted positions of the intersection of the generated and reflected waves.  A physical effect of a system of varying waves of accelerating frequency could generate a blue shift evident to a viewer near their generation. 
 

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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To vary the mass at a single position on the space time surface we could run a few different techniques.  The key to their utility would be techniques to arbitrarily control the mass variance, increasing or decreasing mass at will.  (Please add others as you may think possible.). 
1. Accelerating a entire mass at a single position, as in increased rotation of mass
2. Coincidental increase in mass at a single location, where separate masses move to coincide at a single position, as in masses on separate, but closely adjacent rings align to form a system of masses at a single point.
3. Contained nuclear detonation at single position, where the individual particles of a mass achieve tremendous acceleration.
 

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