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Author Topic: Nurse and Mother of a budding scientist  (Read 1924 times)

Offline rosie gudonis

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Nurse and Mother of a budding scientist
« on: 17/11/2014 12:44:55 »

Am quite ecstatic that I found this site...quite randomly (science in action there one thinks)...am a bit of a science hound but alas, do not have the number of neurons it takes to be SMART  (Possibly have only one synapse a week and two or three neurons!!).
Anyhoo: son of 21 is a budding scientist like his dad....so when junior calls at 0300 to excitedly tell me about fibonacci numbers or molecular division (is that a thing?) I feel I need to be a little more informed.
So please speak slowly to me....and put some damn clothes on...you will catch your death!!
Rosie G
Australia


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Nurse and Mother of a budding scientist
« Reply #1 on: 17/11/2014 23:34:41 »
Apologies. I thought the webcam was switched off. But welcome anyway, and tell the lad that Fibonacci was publishing around 700 years ago, so his numbers will keep until after breakfast, surely.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Nurse and Mother of a budding scientist
« Reply #2 on: 17/11/2014 23:56:53 »
... junior calls at 0300 to excitedly tell me about fibonacci numbers or molecular division (is that a thing?) 

over a bad phone line could be asymmetrical division ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asymmetric_cell_division

which will produce the Fibonacci sequence ...

Quote from: Amar J. S. Klar
Asymmetric cell division offers a possible explanation of the spiral patterns seen in many plants ...  The spiral arrangements of leaves on a stem, and the number of petals, sepals and spirals in flower heads during the development of most plants, represent successive numbers in the famous series discovered in the thirteenth century by the Italian mathematician Fibonacci, in which each number is the sum of the previous two (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55...)
http://webpages.fc.ul.pt/~maloucao/Klar.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_sequence#In_nature

« Last Edit: 18/11/2014 00:17:42 by RD »
 

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Re: Nurse and Mother of a budding scientist
« Reply #2 on: 17/11/2014 23:56:53 »

 

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