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Author Topic: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality  (Read 4210 times)

Offline TheMoon

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #25 on: 24/11/2014 21:52:09 »
I don't think there is any clear evidence; but I think there are some strong analogies between the nature of the mind and physical reality.  On the subject of the degeneracy of hidden variables, Einstein's theory of relativity, Group theory and Fourier transform have not been stirred due to my interpretation.  I also point out that the true test of such hypothesis is whether the system is able to replicate an unspecified observable and again I see no flaws relating to this, nor Einstein's theory of light, Group theory or Fourier transform.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #26 on: 24/11/2014 23:12:27 »
I'm so relieved that you have found no flaws in group theory or the Fourier transform. It would be a shame if a century of crystallography, aeronautics and electronics was based on unsound mathematics. As for relativity, I'm sure a generation or two of accelerator engineers, astronomers and navigators will appreciate your endorsement. If you have a moment, could you also perhaps take credit for abolishing the national debt and curing cancer?
 

Offline TheMoon

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #27 on: 24/11/2014 23:48:04 »
I clearly said my interpretation left no flaws, meaning if it had, my interpretation would have been incorrect.  Neither did I find flaws in the english I used in expressing that statement.  Did you.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #28 on: 25/11/2014 01:01:59 »
Can't say I was looking to criticise your language, just poking around trying to make sense of the physics.
 

Offline TheMoon

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #29 on: 19/12/2014 18:09:18 »
A less arbitrary interpretation of hidden variables takes less into account the hidden variables themselves in order to grasp further the local aspect.  Suppose the actual entanglement with regards to particles is with the photons and the relation of a supposed entangled pair of particles has to do with their individual negative or positive relation with the photon, rather than with each other.  I mean, if one takes an object and suppose that the only reason, so far, one is unable to verify the relation between local (observable)  and non-local (the other side of the object at the other end of the universe) is that the light only allows us to see the local half.  We are assuming that the object, which include entangled photons take up the whole of space.  The local half of the object has particles at a distance the length of the observable. These behave as entangled pairs at an infinite distance apart,  but for the reason they do not occupy the whole of space and therefore differ from the previous interpretation.  In this interpretation, the only real entangled pairs is a point at a local side and a point at a non-local side. Note, however, not in this interpretation to be an entangled pair.  That is, one of the particles shares a positive relation to any single photon present at angle, while the other particle shares a negative relation.  For instance, if one observes a point at one angle, then the entanglement of the point and photon are related by the angle at which the photon allows us to observe the point and the angle by which the point is seen.    Concerning degeneracy, one could describe one entangled point at the cusp of observability as having a 1 relation to the photon and the point on the other side of the object as having -1 relation.  All points may be described as having consequent positive or negative relation to the photon.  Since the object takes up the whole of space can be confirmed via a measurement of such relations.  The difference between describing entanglement of particles , rather than entanglement of particle and photon is that one could not thus describe a local and non-local system, because photons would be classed as separate from the system, therefore the system could not take up the whole of space.
« Last Edit: 19/12/2014 18:14:10 by TheMoon »
 

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Re: Quantum Mechanics: The Road to Reality
« Reply #29 on: 19/12/2014 18:09:18 »

 

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