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Author Topic: The maximum speed limits of the universe vs. The Higgs field.  (Read 1610 times)

Offline infomancr

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An one else suspect there might be a max matter and energy transition limit for the universe?  By this I mean beyond the asymptotic limit of mass velocity being the speed of light but moreover how quickly matter and energy can transition states; how quickly electrons can "jumps" etc. It is my understanding that all these questions can be answered with 'light speed" but how about waves? Is there a maximum frequency that a wave can oscillate?

 If the medium of waves is particles consisting of mass then the geodesic velocity of any wave when measured by particle velocity would never exceed c, right? However it seems possible that waves do exist at higher frequencies maybe in rare circumstances such as when particles collide at nearing light speeds,or perhaps there may be very common instances.  I understand that it what would be difficult for a wave to exist without a medium but what if these stray "tachyon waves" do sporadically find their way to channel through matter; even for only a fraction of a nanosecond but for perhaps just enough time to  energize exotic matter into measurability?

So to cut to the chase: Does anyone think it may be possible that the Higgs field may be directly related to this cosmological bottleneck I. E.  the max speed limit of energy transmission? And wouldn't this bottleneck,as waves compete over matter like bread crumbs in an ocean, manifest itself as inertia and thereby mass?

I should stop here lest this end up buried walls of text that no one will ever read.

Tl:dr

If stables particles can only channel waves up to a certain maximun frequency, is this lag responsible particle drag, inertia and the Higgs field?

I will value any responses.
« Last Edit: 27/11/2014 02:20:13 by infomancr »


 

Offline infomancr

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Nobody?  =/
 

Offline evan_au

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Heisenberg's uncertainty principle defines a limit on how accurately you can measure position and momentum.

When you are measuring very small objects and very small distances, you can't do this with absolute precision, so it is possible that some events could occur that violate our macroscopic concepts of speed or energy, provided these violations only last a short time.
 

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