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Author Topic: How does time move slower at high speeds?  (Read 11999 times)

Offline Toffo

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #25 on: 22/12/2014 15:20:24 »
Yes. I changed "redshift" to "blueshift". And now it's absolutely correct.


Hey here's an idea: Electric motor rotates a hot flat iron very fast ... lighting with good efficiency.

« Last Edit: 22/12/2014 19:28:00 by evan_au »
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #26 on: 22/12/2014 15:33:23 »
If we use light as the object infalling or climbing out of a gravity well, you can think of it as a result of conservation laws acting on it. A light quanta is a light quanta, on its own it does not change energy as far as I understand, it's always in the interaction with something this happen, in this case gravity. actually not so unlike a time dilation which also demands someone measuring, comparing his local clock and ruler to someone elses. The difference there being the twin experiment, in where you will find a different biological aging after they join up, being in a same frame of reference as it is called. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueshift#Gravitational_blueshift
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #27 on: 22/12/2014 15:40:26 »
Conservation laws are one strange pimpernel though, similar to the idea of 'c'. We know they exist, but why? It would be easier to understand if we assumed that the universe was 'contained' in something that kept all energy inside it, only allowing transformations. but defining it that way would also define a outside, and there is none. Without that outside you have to look elsewhere for a explanation to why they exist. We have them and can use them to explain some stuff, but just as 'c',  I don't see any easy explanation to why they exist.
 

Offline petm1

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #28 on: 24/12/2014 04:00:29 »
ah, ok. Not about clocks at all is it? It's about what makes it happens, right? One answer is that we have found 'c' to be correct. And that is doesn't matter how uniformly 'fast' you find yourself to move relatively others, you will still measure 'c' everywhere, and so will those others. It's a 'jagged' universe in a way, and what communicates our perception of it is light. that is a mystery though, Einstein had no explanation to why 'c' is 'c' as far as I know. And it is also so that you either can think of it, as if only when proved, did that 'time dilation' really exist, which then always will crave some sort of twin experiment for it to be proved. Or you can do as I do and accept time dilations on their face values, that means that what you measure is what you also will find to exist, for you, at that place and time you measured. It simplifies it.

Outward from a focal point is the motion of energy, dilation is the motion of time, both are the same direction.  Think of big bang as a white hole with an outward flow of energy from a focal point that today we measure as the force of gravity, 9.8 meters per second per second.  Every where we look we see the same motion and it is all traveling in the same direction, in time.  Why is the speed of light always "c"? IMME it is because we are not colliding into light we are always catching it in time, as a static energy level in space.
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #29 on: 24/12/2014 05:51:05 »
hmm, you're thinking of gravity as coming out of a fountain, if I read you right? And the Big bang as the fountains origin with the flow of the fountain being time? Difficult concept to defend as there is no 'point' from where that Big Bang originated, it's not of a localized origin according to inflation. And the proof of that is when you look out at the starry sky finding it to look much the same in any direction. A homogeneous and isotropic universe. So you will need a lot of fountains as each one of us then can be considered a 'origin' of a Big Bang, alternatively use particles to define 'origins', including bosons. Each one of them are a 'center' of a Big Bang as I read it, alternatively you need more dimensions, or fewer :)
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #30 on: 28/12/2014 00:46:25 »
Professor Brian Fox did a programme on BBC he nearly got it right. The delay in the measurement produces a decrease in the moving objects clock (back and forth) but the clock on the moving object is going actually faster. If you think about this you may come up with a different answer.
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #31 on: 02/01/2015 16:01:55 »
Doesn't matter. Logically a "delayment" means nothing. Think of it as a movie that someone sits on, he will only leave you it after some time, defined by him. Doesn't matter for the movie. And I'm severly disapointed in English not having 'delayment'. Make it happen :)
 

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Re: How does time move slower at high speeds?
« Reply #31 on: 02/01/2015 16:01:55 »

 

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