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Author Topic: does anyone think this would work?  (Read 1318 times)

Offline domkarr

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does anyone think this would work?
« on: 14/12/2014 01:02:11 »
hello to anyone reading my post

I'm new here and thought that i would give a bit of self publishing a go. After a bit of searching I was glad to come across such a site, so I thank the people who have had the good graces to make such a place available.
Well done, very perceptive and forward think of you Cambridge.

Please, if you are reading this, be as honest and harsh as you can possibly be as science doesn't go anywhere without harsh and skeptical minds tearing to pieces an honest attempt to move ahead. On with the theory.
 
To start with, the idea is a basic enough structure consisting mainly of concrete and rust resistant materials so as to avert the structure from collapsing several years after construction.

The design is that of a basic dome made from intersecting pieces of concrete and held together with plastic coated metal framework (I'll post a diagram or two following the article). The dome shape is of most essence as you will hopefully agree.
The dome should be built somewhere along the coastline somewhere with high UV ratings to maximise the energy output of the banks of solar panels. The solar panels line the outside walls on three sides of the dome, the three sides that are most exposed to the sun of course. the third side is used to collect the protective plating that runs on the very outside of the structure used in times of turbulent weather in order to protect the solar panels.

Inside the dome is a series of heat lamps or elements (which ever turns out to be more energy efficient). Sea water is drawn in through vents at the bottom of the structure which then close once enough water is drawn within.
The lining on the inside of the dome wall (besides the elements) is a smooth but rippled surface that allows water to collect and slide down the walls into a catchment that is also lining the bottom of the dome.
A pipe is attached to the catchment and runs to a nearby facility that houses a hydro-electricity turbine and de-salinisation plant.

so now that i have described the structure I will attempt to explain what i believe this structure will accomplish (if you haven't figured it out already). Water is drawn into the chamber through the vents, the chamber is then sealed, the solar panels are exposed to the sun by opening the protective panels or the power is simply switched on, the energy created by the solar panels then powers the elements or heat lamps that then generate (in the sealed chamber) more and more heat.

The heat will quite quickly become enough that it will boil the sea water and a process of steaming or evaporation will begin. the steam will condense on the roof and walls of the inner dome as much cleaner, fresh water and run down the rippled walls into the catchment. The pressure of the chamber will then force the fresh water through the pipe creating a heavy flow that will, after traveling through the pipe, spin the hydro-electricity turbine generating even more electricity and powering the de-salinisation plant that will remove any excess impurities and make the water drinkable for a human being.

So just to make sure you are on the same page. I believe that I have discovered a cheap, effective way of generating both clean drinking water and electricity simultaneously in the most arid regions on Earth. This will allow for more of the world to be inhabited by people and possibly help ease overpopulation.
Also there will be a number of useful byproducts such as salt and minerals left on the floor of the chamber.

By all means rip my idea to pieces as any suggestions that can be added to make this thing actually work would mean that you would become contributor and probably would earn yourself some money if the idea ever makes any.

I haven't been able to make a small scale model or run any tests as I haven't got any funding or support but I would welcome any interest shown in actually building one of these devices (if there aren't any major faults that I have overlooked).

I predict that a full scale version would probably stand around three stories high to get an idea of scale and be very cheap to construct as the materials are easy to come by and cheap. If there were six of these surrounding the de-salinisation plant there would be a lot of water and electricity generated. Probably enough to allow ten to twenty thousand to live comfortably all year round or I assume so.

Anyways that was it. My name is Dominic Carr from Australia mate  [8D]
thanks for reading



 

Offline Oceanbliss

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Re: does anyone think this would work?
« Reply #1 on: 16/12/2014 07:42:51 »
I think its an interesting concept you have there only because it creates clean water in the process.

On the top of my head... Sea creatures are bound to either get stuck inside or cause clogs... and also what makes the hoover dam work so well is the pressure it builds to push the generators so that would also be a factor
 

Offline domkarr

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Re: does anyone think this would work?
« Reply #2 on: 17/12/2014 07:35:58 »
I had considered that creatures and seaweed might get caught int the vents but supposing There was a shallow artificial inlet that created an inland sea after flowing through a series of netting or fencing?

I would like to create some sort of small scale model to find out exactly how much pressure could be generated by the steam but my budget at the moment is non existent because I'm still studying as a student. but from simple tests conducted with kitchen utensils i found that there was certainly a level of pressure built (a cooking pot with rice and water filled close to the top). steam pressure added gravity feed (the pipeline at a lower level than the rest of the structure) and size of a full scale structure Plus the closure of the vents creating a pressure seal. I think that it might be capable of creating quite a lot of force and therefore spin quite a powerful little hydro-turbine.

you made some very good suggestions ocean are you an engineer at all?

 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: does anyone think this would work?
« Reply #2 on: 17/12/2014 07:35:58 »

 

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