The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Does the electron experience tidal forces?  (Read 1858 times)

Offline jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3927
  • Thanked: 55 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« on: 01/01/2015 23:53:44 »
We assume that the weakness of gravitation goes all the way to the Planck scale and is overpowered by other forces. If it is not could the standing wave nature of the electron be due to tidal forces present around the nucleus?


 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4724
  • Thanked: 155 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« Reply #1 on: 02/01/2015 08:49:29 »
You don't need a nucleus to have an electron. Not sure what is meant by the "standing wave nature" - do you mean the orbital distribution of electrons around a nucleus?
 

Offline evan_au

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4128
  • Thanked: 247 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« Reply #2 on: 02/01/2015 10:00:15 »
The electrical (Coulomb) attraction between proton & electron is far greater than the gravitational force between them. So I expect that the electric field will have a larger impact on the behaviour of an electron near a proton than the gravitational field (or tidal force, which is like the derivative of the gravitational force).
 

Offline PmbPhy

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2762
  • Thanked: 38 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« Reply #3 on: 02/01/2015 13:13:18 »
Quote from: jeffreyH
We assume that the weakness of gravitation goes all the way to the Planck scale and is overpowered by other forces. If it is not could the standing wave nature of the electron be due to tidal forces present around the nucleus?
Hi Jeff. I'm not clear on exactly what it is that you're trying to say. If you don't mind me asking, what do you mean by it? What do you mean when you say that the weakness of gravitation going down all the way to the Planck scale? What do you mean by it being it being over powered by other forces. What other "force" are you speaking about? 

Then you say "If it is not...". What do you mean "is not". Not what?

You also asked whether or not it could be possible that a standing wave nature of the electron could be possible due to tidal forces present around the nucleus. The answer is no. Most certainly no.
« Last Edit: 02/01/2015 13:20:16 by PmbPhy »
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11999
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Re: Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« Reply #4 on: 02/01/2015 13:16:20 »
I think, but I'm not sure, that Einstein wondered in similar terms Jeffrey. As if gravity, or 'micro gravity' had a difference to a particle . Maybe Pete know something on that question?
==

the point is that I did read about it, somewhere, sometime. But it has to be several years ago. And? I can't verify it
« Last Edit: 02/01/2015 13:25:20 by yor_on »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Does the electron experience tidal forces?
« Reply #4 on: 02/01/2015 13:16:20 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums