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Author Topic: Can we use stimulated molecular vibration beam as a kind of Star Trek scan beam?  (Read 1204 times)

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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In IR spectroscopy they induce a vibrational response in a material to understand its composition. If we set a series of induced pulsed vibrations in a material would they create a resonance that would transfer through multiple objects or materials in a coherent beam? Could we read the vibrational response in reverse through the beam in the rest phase between pulses?  Using time of signal return the variations of vibrational response would be like a core sample through any combinations of material and/or voids.
« Last Edit: 18/01/2015 10:47:02 by Expectant_Philosopher »


 

Offline PmbPhy

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In IR spectroscopy they induce a vibrational response in a material to understand its composition. If we set a series of induced pulsed vibrations in a material would they create a resonance that would transfer through multiple objects or materials in a coherent beam? Could we read the vibrational response in reverse through the beam in the rest phase between pulses?  Using time of signal return the variations of vibrational response would be like a core sample through any combinations of material and/or voids.
That description is very poor. For example: what are induced pulsed vibrations? What kind of resonance are you talking about? How is a coherent beam created and used?

Why IR anyway? When you do that you're limiting the range of responses only to the infrared spectrum.
 

Offline chiralSPO

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If I understand this question correctly, it sounds like you want to perform spectroscopy on all points in a line through an object.

The main issue I see here is that the more your EM beam interacts with the subject, the less it will penetrate, and vice versa. This means that you can get a lot of information about the surface of an object, or a little information from deeper in (the depth depending on wavelengths and properties of the subject being analyzed), but there are very few techniques that will allow information to be gathered throughout a macroscopic object.

It is possible to get long range coherent vibrations in well defined crystalline substances, but I would expect it to break down at boundaries within and between objects.

If I have misunderstood your idea, please try to explain it a little more.
 

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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chiralSPO, you are right on the money for the concept, using some form of spectroscopy to see at depth through a material.  It doesn't have to be IR that was just an example of the process, it could be Raman, CSRS, CARS, etc. Trying to set up a coherent vibration pattern that would be passed along from molecule to molecule.  The initiating beams would be pulsed, and during the pause between pulses the molecules in the material would revert to an equilibrium state and by doing so give a characteristic vibration.  I would think, speculate the total energy input would determine the total depth of scan.  I think, speculate that multiple beams applied would allow transfer of vibrations deeper into a material as I speculate that the vibrations of one beam excite the molecules enough to make them transparent to the next vibration inducing beam.  Something like Flash from the comic books who in the comic vibrated his body fast enough to pass through a wall as if it were not there.
« Last Edit: 18/01/2015 20:18:59 by Expectant_Philosopher »
 

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