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Author Topic: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?  (Read 68989 times)

Offline Bill S

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #200 on: 07/06/2015 20:49:27 »
https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=2348

"Q:
Why are photons (all wavelengths) considered to be instruments of the so-called "electromagnetic force"? So far as I know, please correct me, photons have no electrical charge nor are they influenced by magnetic fields. The term "electromagnetic spectrum" seems to me to be very inappropriate and highly misleading. Perhaps I am missing something? Thank you!
- grahame (age 60)
PA
A:
Grahame- You�re right that electromagnetic waves, whether viewed classically or in terms of quantized photons, are not affected by static electrical or magnetic fields. They have no charge. Nevertheless, they do exert electrical and magnetic forces on charged particles and magnetic particles. Viewed classically, they consist of nothing but electrical and magnetic fields propagating through space, so it�s entirely appropriate to call them electromagnetic waves.

Mike W."

No wonder we !hitch-hikers" become confused!
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #201 on: 07/06/2015 22:11:55 »
between any atoms there is gravitation force f=G x m1m2/r^2. fact

1 atom vibrates in 1 direction, all other atoms within its gravitational field feel the vibration force according to distance and force direction. logically sounding. fact.

are gravitation waves carry energy? yes. is gravitation wave a particle? no.  is gravitation wave needs medium to propagate? yes, mass and distance.

if em radiation is not gravitation radiation, what is it? photon emitted by atoms?

how hot gasses on the sun emit photons? electrons change orbitals? how many orbitals in a hot gas atom? why is sunlight spectrum continue?

the whole atomic structure is unclear, otherwise, why is all question on page 8 not answered fully?

   
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #202 on: 08/06/2015 02:25:09 »
Viewed classically, they consist of nothing but electrical and magnetic fields propagating through space, so it�s entirely appropriate to call them electromagnetic waves.

both fields have force carrier. what is it? photon?

is this a joke?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #203 on: 22/06/2015 19:35:11 »
Viewed classically, they consist of nothing but electrical and magnetic fields propagating through space, so it�s entirely appropriate to call them electromagnetic waves.

both fields have force carrier. what is it? photon?

is this a joke?

no 1 cares about photon anymore?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #204 on: 23/06/2015 19:02:52 »
now i believe its fair enough to say

photon lost all its energy right here already?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #205 on: 23/06/2015 20:37:14 »
remember when nasa bomb the moon, the moon ringed for a long time? that was the impact force made the moon vibrating.

when the moon was ringing from that impact, it produced gravitational waves, mostly absorbed by earth, then the near by matters. the nasa spaceship detected that gravity/shock waves, otherwise how do they know the moon is ringing?

is photon/em wave just mistake interpretation of gravitational wave?

rethink the results in the double slit experiment?
 
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #206 on: 24/06/2015 04:31:31 »
wonder where qm goes if light/em wave proved/accepted as gravitational wave?

 
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #207 on: 24/06/2015 23:28:02 »
light was not there before you detect it.

light is gravitational wave between the source atoms and the target/detector atoms.
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #208 on: 25/06/2015 23:54:06 »
i was dreaming...

einstein said: look, i told you God does not play dice.

newton said: i told you light is wave.

tesla said: vibration, vibration, vibration,

pete said: shut up and calculate!
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #209 on: 26/06/2015 00:56:30 »
ethos said : wow

alan said: alas

chiralSPO said : apparently

box said: i'm tired

bill said: me2

what do you say?
 

Offline PmbPhy

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Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #211 on: 26/06/2015 12:42:47 »
Isn't it great. You start a thread to gather opinion and hopefully learn something. Then it is hijacked and all the opinion is lost in the dross. We might as well just all PM each other.
 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #212 on: 26/06/2015 14:02:04 »
Isn't it great. You start a thread to gather opinion and hopefully learn something. Then it is hijacked and all the opinion is lost in the dross. We might as well just all PM each other.


...yeah... it had a pretty good run before "somebody" knocked it way off topic. If I have time this weekend, I might try to clean this thread up a bit...
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #213 on: 26/06/2015 14:13:04 »
The larger issue is if an electron captures a photon then what velocity does the photon have? It is either orbiting the electron or it slows down. Another biggy is if the photon has no charge then how could an electron capture it in the first place? Isn't it then as likely to be captured by a proton or neutron?

clear now?
 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #214 on: 26/06/2015 15:46:43 »
Isn't it great. You start a thread to gather opinion and hopefully learn something. Then it is hijacked and all the opinion is lost in the dross. We might as well just all PM each other.
I'm convinced these random dross comments put newcomers off posting, it's almost as if the question isnt taken seriously but used as a new theory platform..
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #215 on: 26/06/2015 16:46:00 »
Quote from: Colin
....but used as a new theory platform.

I'm glad you identified it.  I would never have suspected it of being a theory!

I absolutely agree that it must be off-putting.  I have been posting on three discussion forums for a few years, and TNS is still the best of those, but there is a limit to how much trolling any forum stand. 

BTW Pete, your forum is not included in the three.  I've not been with that anywhere near as long as the others, and your setup militates against trolling.
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #216 on: 26/06/2015 17:08:25 »
Isn't it great. You start a thread to gather opinion and hopefully learn something. Then it is hijacked and all the opinion is lost in the dross. We might as well just all PM each other.


...yeah... it had a pretty good run before "somebody" knocked it way off topic. If I have time this weekend, I might try to clean this thread up a bit...

off topic? photon?
Isn't it great. You start a thread to gather opinion and hopefully learn something. Then it is hijacked and all the opinion is lost in the dross. We might as well just all PM each other.
I'm convinced these random dross comments put newcomers off posting, it's almost as if the question isnt taken seriously but used as a new theory platform..


my questions hang there for 2 weeks, any 1 answered any?
Quote from: Colin
....but used as a new theory platform.

I'm glad you identified it.  I would never have suspected it of being a theory!
 

what do you suspect it is? dross?
 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #217 on: 26/06/2015 17:42:25 »
Quote from: Colin
....but used as a new theory platform.

I'm glad you identified it.  I would never have suspected it of being a theory!

I use the word theory in it's very loosest sense. The same sense that most of the new theorists use it. (jefferyH, I don't include you in that, you know what a theory is)

Strange that the trollers don't understand why eventually folks stop responding to their deaf-eared questions.
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #218 on: 26/06/2015 20:31:45 »
Quote from: jccc
what do you suspect it is? dross?

Why would you think I meant that?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #219 on: 26/06/2015 20:39:05 »
Quote from: jccc
what do you suspect it is? dross?

Why would you think I meant that?

my bad. i misinterpreted your comments.
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #220 on: 27/06/2015 14:00:33 »
Quote from: jccc
i misinterpreted your comments.

Have you ever wondered about the wisdom of jumping to conclusions?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #221 on: 27/06/2015 16:53:34 »
a. sunlight is electrons in hot atoms change orbital/energy level emitted photon particles that travel at c.

b. sunlight is vibrating hot atoms produced gravitational waves that propagate at c.

which 1 is your Pick? why?
 

Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #222 on: 27/06/2015 18:01:27 »
does laser beam able to bend a flame?

does laser beam produce air flow?

if laser beam is beam of photon particles, it would bend flame and produce air flow.

from the videos i saw, never happen.

how do you think?

is solar sailing even possible?
 

Offline Bill S

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Offline jccc

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #224 on: 27/06/2015 20:01:21 »
all the info out there, one has to make up his own mind about anything.

based on observation fact and proven laws, i think light is gravity wave.

if you need mainstream community to make you believe my theory, you may need to wait a while.



 
 

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Re: Would the photon lose all its energy at infinity?
« Reply #224 on: 27/06/2015 20:01:21 »

 

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