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Author Topic: Getting back on track with good physics  (Read 7773 times)

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #25 on: 26/02/2015 19:06:28 »
Quote from: David Cooper
The danger with that is that you end up teaching people to go with the herd instead of learning to think.
That sounds like the way it would actually be in practice but in reality it's not. I don't think that you're getting what I mean though.

Quote from: David Cooper
You're probably right though to think that most people will go with the herd - that seems to be the normal way of things, but it's not something I want any part in because the whole approach of judging the correctness of a position by the number of people supporting it, regardless of how idiotic that position might be. Most of the worst problems in the world are caused by this.
This tells me that you missed my point. The point is not for members to jump in to agree with the correct physics but to jump in to correct the flawed reasoning.
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #26 on: 26/02/2015 20:25:43 »
This tells me that you missed my point. The point is not for members to jump in to agree with the correct physics but to jump in to correct the flawed reasoning.

You're right - a correction should only be needed once, but if a correction has been ignored it's well worth someone else repeating it to try to make the ignorer register it. That's a place where numbers of people saying the same thing probably can make a difference.
 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #27 on: 26/02/2015 20:32:50 »
This tells me that you missed my point. The point is not for members to jump in to agree with the correct physics but to jump in to correct the flawed reasoning.

You're right - a correction should only be needed once, but if a correction has been ignored it's well worth someone else repeating it to try to make the ignorer register it. That's a place where numbers of people saying the same thing probably can make a difference.
Exactly, my friend. :)

However, let us not forget the power of moral support. Sometimes when someone is driving me nuts a friend or two will send me a PM letting me know that the person berating me is way off and I'm on track. That kind of thing helps more that you can imagine. It relieves a great deal of stress in fact.
« Last Edit: 26/02/2015 20:35:41 by PmbPhy »
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #28 on: 26/02/2015 22:29:37 »
I'll bear that in mind in future and maybe send you the occasional PM to help assure you that you aren't losing your mind. I've just done that for someone else here.
 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #29 on: 26/02/2015 22:49:41 »
Quote from: David Cooper
I've just done that for someone else here.
My compliments. That's the sign of true friendship! :)
 

Offline Russell Crawford

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #30 on: 01/03/2015 13:19:51 »
It would seem to me that if one constructs a hypothesis and pursues an answer to the hypothesis that is based in scientific law, math and principle, then it should be respected.

The fact that one has made an error or errors is human and should be the basis for a rebuttal based on scientific law, math and principle. The posting of such information would seem to resolve the issue.

If one cannot make a rebuttal without a mixture of opinion, then the answer would seem to be open for discussion.

If one group of "scientists" has a group view that one opinion is better than another opinion, then that is not a scientific fact, but opinion and should be open to a very wide ranging discussion that is directed in the search for truth.

If there is real "proof" that is universally accepted, not opinion, then it is a scientific fact and should be presented as such. Your opinion or my opinion as to an issue in dispute is not scientific fact. It is opinion.

That said, some things are scientifically "accepted" on opinion alone in that they are seen as a basis of understanding. For example we assume the law of physics are universal and unchanging through out the universe. Such an understanding, though not capable of proof, is seen as foundational and required in order for mankind to have even a rudimentary understanding of his surroundings. However, a theory that predicts that gravity or energy will vary from our normal understanding should be acceptable for discussion even if only among a small minority of researchers. The lack of discussion in such a situation is more dangerous than the discussion itself. Principles such as "the uncertainty principle" depend on the imagination of the human mind with wide ranging thought by interested researchers.

 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #31 on: 01/03/2015 14:17:03 »
Russell Crawford - The mature members of this forum know all of this. The problem is that there are may immature members posting here.
 

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Re: Getting back on track with good physics
« Reply #31 on: 01/03/2015 14:17:03 »

 

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