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Author Topic: Could cold fusion of hydrogen be possible under the correct conditions?  (Read 886 times)

Offline JLByrne

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This is in terms of cold fusion between Hydrogen-1 and Hydrogen-2 atoms. If we were to use a higher temperature such as 100-200 degrees centigrade and use a higher pressure than previous experiments have then I think that this could make cold fusion between hydrogen atoms possible. I suggest using a higher pressure because this would ensure that the electrostatic repulsion has minimal or no effect on the particles.
Please do point out all problems.


 

Offline chiralSPO

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They already use extremely high pressures to do "hot fusion". Changing from 25 C to 200 C (298 to 473 K) is unlikely to make a significant difference in the rate of fusion due to the extremely high energies required to overcome the electrostatic repulsion.

I think anything colder than 10000 K counts as "cold fusion." (Hot fusion is many millions of degrees)

It is possible to reduce the repulsion dramatically by bombarding the reactants with muons, but as far as I know no one has come close to producing more energy than is required to generate the muons in the first place.

If you haven't already, I recommend reading some of the following articles on wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusion_power
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_fusion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Ignition_Facility
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokamak_Fusion_Test_Reactor
 

Offline JLByrne

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So lets say that the temperature was increased to say 8000 K and the pressure was 50000 ATM do you think that having high pressure but not actively heating the hydrogen could result in less energy input and some form of energy output when or if the hydrogen particles collide. I have heard of some scientists achieving cold fusion at normal temperatures and pressures, although this is not repeatable and maybe even non-existent, do you see any way for this to happen?
« Last Edit: 13/03/2015 21:38:42 by JLByrne »
 

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