The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?  (Read 1361 times)

Offline cheryl j

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1460
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« on: 02/04/2015 05:03:04 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases

I thought this is an interesting list from wikipedia. What's your favorite?

A few I liked were Frequency Illusion,impact bias, outcome bias, and pseudocertainty effect.

It's an interesting list, as it not only describes biases that pop up in forum discussions, but Ithe list summarizes nearly every frustrating experience or bad decision people ever make in their entire life. I'd argue that this list is worth more than any self help book ever written.


 

Offline Ethos_

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1277
  • Thanked: 14 times
    • View Profile
Re: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« Reply #1 on: 02/04/2015 05:29:00 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases

I thought this is an interesting list from wikipedia. What's your favorite?

A few I liked were Frequency Illusion,impact bias, outcome bias, and pseudocertainty effect.


Excellent information Cheryl, quite interesting and revealing.

I'm certainly not a member of the Bandwagon effect but I must confess to having a little of the Confirmation bias.

Rather lengthy list so I shall delve in with a certain degree of trepidation. The expectation of having my ego deflated is not something I look forward to. Gazing into the mirror of self examination takes courage but alas, I shall endure the pain. Throwing caution to the wind, with clinched teeth I march forth into the great unknown.........................HELP!!
« Last Edit: 02/04/2015 05:33:55 by Ethos_ »
 

Offline cheryl j

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1460
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« Reply #2 on: 02/04/2015 22:55:58 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases

I thought this is an interesting list from wikipedia. What's your favorite?

A few I liked were Frequency Illusion,impact bias, outcome bias, and pseudocertainty effect.


Excellent information Cheryl, quite interesting and revealing.

I'm certainly not a member of the Bandwagon effect but I must confess to having a little of the Confirmation bias.

Rather lengthy list so I shall delve in with a certain degree of trepidation. The expectation of having my ego deflated is not something I look forward to. Gazing into the mirror of self examination takes courage but alas, I shall endure the pain. Throwing caution to the wind, with clinched teeth I march forth into the great unknown.........................HELP!!

Lol. I know what you mean. On the other hand, I found the list somewhat reassuring in that obviously I am not the only one who sometimes makes these logical blunders if it's actually a recognized brain phenomenon. And as I looked down the list, I found myself thinking "Oh, I didn't realize there was an actual name for that."

One cognitive bias that I wish I had been more aware of a few years ago is the pseudo certainty effect or zero risk bias, although I think it might have another name. Wiki describes it as the irrational tendency to be risk aversive for positive outcomes but risk seeking to avoid negative ones. But another common scenario is this: you have two options: you can accept a moderately painful guaranteed loss. Or you can gamble, and your gamble involves either getting off with no loss at all, or a much, much bigger loss than the first.  Even if the odds are bad, people are averse to accepting a guaranteed small loss, and tend to gamble, on the possibility of getting off with no loss at all. It's funny how individuals are always reluctant to opt for damage control, while corporations, settling out of court in a law suit, do it all the time.

Also, some on the wiki  list are actually a little comforting like "outcome bias." People often blame others or beat up themselves for the outcome of decisions that were actually the most rational ones you could have made at the time, given the information you had, or the odds you were given. It's funny how many of the cognitive biases are well known in other ways. Confirmation bias is similar to Monday morning quarter backing, or hindsight is 20/20.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2015 02:16:38 by cheryl j »
 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4717
  • Thanked: 154 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« Reply #3 on: 02/04/2015 23:35:14 »
A superb resource - many thanks for finding it!

The Dunning-Kruger effect pays a good part of my wages. People with no charm , intelligence or education, who would otherwise be classed as unemployable, get appointed as health and safety inspectors or registrars of professional bodies, then prosecute entirely sensible professionals for alleged breaches of good practice. The allegation usually rests on some cognitive bias or prejudice and rarely on any actual facts or calculations. The weaker the case, the more pompous and strident the accusation. My job is to present the facts and calculations for the defence, and given a choice I always take the most outrageous cases.

Now as the laws of physics are timeless, immutable, and set down in elementary textbooks for all to see, this could be a shortlived and unprofitable career if the moronic jobsworths took a sound public beating in court, but fortunately for me, most of my clients seem to prefer damage control and they opt for plea bargaining rather than destroying the prosecution, so the cases just keep on coming!   
 

Offline cheryl j

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1460
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« Reply #4 on: 03/04/2015 02:50:25 »
Another interesting bias on the list was blind spot bias - the ability see bias in other people but not oneself.  Humans rely on feedback from others when they are behaving or thinking irrationally. Occasionally one can learn from experience that they tend to make errors in certain environments and compensate - eg I shouldn't shop at the grocery store when I'm hungry. Humans also learn to compensate for this by reviewing the outcomes of past decisions. I wonder how AI programmers might teach a computer or robot to learn or anticipate bias - that is, to self diagnose a problem in its own internal workings. I guess computers can already do that to to a degree. But would it be easier or more difficult to spot bias, the more intelligent the AI machine was?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Who knew there were so many ways to be biased?
« Reply #4 on: 03/04/2015 02:50:25 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length