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Author Topic: Quantum Entanglement  (Read 1226 times)

Offline TheMoon

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Quantum Entanglement
« on: 11/04/2015 22:12:36 »
I've read a few snippets on the web recently, which concern quantum entanglement, also whether data passed from one particle to another happens instantly and faster than the speed of light.

I came across these questions because I had been going over some of my old stuff and perhaps they helped me to solve, for my own hypothesis at least, how the instant and seemingly faster than light transfer of data comes about.

What if the measurement of either particle in an entangled state was synonymous with the separation of one from the other, synonymous with the disentanglement of A from B?  What if, before measurement, both particles were only allowed to share the same state, because each shared the same photon?  Then common sense told an observer, for entangled particles positioned a great distance apart, that the measurement process would require that each particle has its own photon.  If this were to happen, the particles would no longer be in a coupled state.  During the measurement process, one particle became disentangled with the original photon in a way that is synonymous with measurement.  To me, this sounds like information may not be transferred in the way one would typically expect.  For instance, it seems to avoid the problem of how data could get transferred faster than the speed of light: the separation of particles - because another becomes entangled with a different photon, is a way of transferring the data that may not require hidden variables.
« Last Edit: 11/04/2015 22:27:17 by TheMoon »


 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Quantum Entanglement
« Reply #1 on: 16/04/2015 17:20:04 »
Quote from: TheMoon
I've read a few snippets on the web recently, which concern quantum entanglement, also whether data passed from one particle to another happens instantly and faster than the speed of light.
Rest assured. No data can be sent faster-than-light (FTL) using quantum entanglement. This phenomena has been closely  studied and it's very clear that FTL communication simply cannot happen using quantum entanglement.

Quote from: TheMoon
What if the measurement of either particle in an entangled state was synonymous with the separation of one from the other, synonymous with the disentanglement of A from B?
I'm sorry but this statement has no meaning and is therefore very confusing. The term synonymous means having the same meaning. So what are you trying to say when you say that an entangled state "has the same meaning" with  the separation of one from the other "has the same meaning" with the "disentanglement of A from B"?

I can't even see what role two entangled states plays in FTL communication.

Quote from: TheMoon
  What if, before measurement, both particles were only allowed to share the same state, because each shared the same photon?
I'm sorry but you'll have to be a great deal clearer than that. For example; state an example where two quantum states "share" a photon.

Quote from: TheMoon
Then common sense told an observer,..
If you try to use common sense in quantum mechanics you're certain to make mistakes.

You should read more about this. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superluminal_communication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-communication_theorem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light
 

Offline TheMoon

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Re: Quantum Entanglement
« Reply #2 on: 16/04/2015 23:31:28 »
I should have said 'perhaps' FTL (due to a debate on hidden variables). 

Synonymous, yes:  I trawled briefly through quite a bit of data before I gathered those snippets.  Due to the tiny bit of knowledge I have on the subject of entanglement, I was led to believe that proof of an entangled pair can only exist as a thought experiment.  Therefore, this hypothesis is based upon proofs gathered during such experiment, where, before measurement the entangled particles were allowed to share the same photon, or I figured how else would I be able to imagine them simultaneous?  However, because of the Uncertainty Principle, the act of measuring the pair could not simultaneous be achieved. 

During the thought experiment, I found that which-ever particle I decided to measure would require a photon - different from the one used to imagine the entangled pair; and that if all proofs for entanglement can only be found through such experiment, then perhaps my explanation can help solve the mystery behind whether or why the effect of measurement of either particle is instant: the change of photon was the process of measurement, that I could not find a way to separate the two... the measurement process was the disentanglement of the pair!  If both statements are true, then perhaps disentanglement would occur instantly, without the involvement of hidden variables.
« Last Edit: 16/04/2015 23:36:03 by TheMoon »
 

Offline tonylang

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Re: Quantum Entanglement
« Reply #3 on: 17/04/2015 19:57:29 »
Travel as we know it is a phenomenon familiar to us via our specific natural implementation as matter in a Higgs field permeated universe and as such is defined specifically by the three dimensions of space and one of time in which we reside. Travel therefore has no meaning in the context of Hilbert-space where entanglement is implemented. To speak of information traveling via quantum entanglement is as meaningless as speaking of memory recall of onesí childhood as information traveling from past to present. Likewise entangled states do not involve travel as we know it. Entanglement is a natural phenomenon that is implemented in Hilbert-space and like most natural entities not manifested in our space-time is observed by us to be non-relativistic, and non-positional in nature. One or both of the participating entangled elements may be relativistic (constrained by the universal laws of relativity) matter but the states they share cannot be so described. Which ones of the many known extra-universal dimensions is entanglement implemented upon is yet to be determined.
 

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Re: Quantum Entanglement
« Reply #3 on: 17/04/2015 19:57:29 »

 

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