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Author Topic: Anyone want to make a new theorem?  (Read 1578 times)

Offline yor_on

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Anyone want to make a new theorem?
« on: 16/04/2015 17:36:02 »
Thinking of the brains structure, and the lungs :)

So?

Think of a towel, as the hitchhikers. How can you 'shrink' it topologically?
How close can it be?

Planck scale?


 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Anyone want to make a new theorem?
« Reply #1 on: 16/04/2015 17:39:58 »
And why would it be important?
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Anyone want to make a new theorem?
« Reply #2 on: 16/04/2015 22:21:16 »
Patterns in the lungs, the surface of the brain, and the circulatory system are often described as fractals.

However, since these are all constructed out of living cells, and human cells must support the overhead of DNA maintenance and replication*, this imposes a lower limit on the scale of these structures.

*Apart from red blood cells - these don't have a nucleus.
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Anyone want to make a new theorem?
« Reply #3 on: 18/04/2015 21:22:02 »
What I was thinking of, partially that is, was also that defined through scaling everything is just as close to Planck scale, everywhere, Evan. and that, to me again, in its turn opens for what a vacuum is when contrasted to matter. It's about 'folding' and also about wondering what connects one position in space and time to another. You connecting matter to fractals is interesting.
 

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Re: Anyone want to make a new theorem?
« Reply #3 on: 18/04/2015 21:22:02 »

 

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