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Author Topic: What is a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum?  (Read 1122 times)

Offline thedoc

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What is a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum?
« on: 17/04/2015 15:46:32 »
Chris asked the Naked Scientists:
   
I would like to calculate a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum.
What do you think?
« Last Edit: 17/04/2015 15:46:32 by _system »


 

Offline UltimateTheory

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Re: What is a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum?
« Reply #1 on: 17/04/2015 16:59:22 »
You will get something like this:

a=9.81 m/s^2 is only at ground level,
the higher altitude the lower will be a.

Different regions of Earth also have different distances to center, different distribution of mass inside, and slightly different accelerations at ground level:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_of_Earth
image map showing variations.
« Last Edit: 17/04/2015 17:06:11 by UltimateTheory »
 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: What is a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum?
« Reply #2 on: 17/04/2015 17:16:25 »
Quote from: UltimateTheory
You will get something like this:

a=9.81 m/s^2 is only at ground level,
the higher altitude the lower will be a.

Different regions of Earth also have different distances to center, different distribution of mass inside, and slightly different accelerations at ground level:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_of_Earth
image map showing variations.
The OP made no statement about being in a gravitational field.

Quote from: thedoc
Chris asked the Naked Scientists:
   
I would like to calculate a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum.
What do you think?
This is an incomplete question. I assume he's asking what the trajectory of an object is that is accelerating at a rate of 1g. If so then see: http://home.comcast.net/~peter.m.brown/sr/uniform_accel.htm  This is a relativistic calculation and as such as exact as can be determined.
 

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Re: What is a 1g constant acceleration in a vacuum?
« Reply #2 on: 17/04/2015 17:16:25 »

 

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