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Author Topic: What connections does silica have with space?  (Read 1814 times)

Offline Thebox

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What connections does silica have with space?
« on: 02/05/2015 10:29:48 »
If any what connection is there to silica and space?

Is silica conductive?

Can silica be a gaseous form?

Can silica be a none dense ''fabric''?


Silica can be transparent like space?










 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: What connections does silica have with space?
« Reply #1 on: 02/05/2015 12:06:53 »
Silica is silicon dioxide, the major constituent of glass. Pyrex and other laboratory glasses are almost pure silica. So what do we know about glass?

It fills space, like any other material

It is an insulator.

It certainly could be a gas as the molecule is stable at high temperatures, but you won't often encounter it as the boiling point is about 2500K

You can weave silica filaments into a flexible fabric but other glasses are more flexible

Nothing can be as transparent as space. Silica certainly transmits visible and near-visible radiation but attenuates pretty much everything elsem to a greater extent. 
 

Offline Ethos_

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Re: What connections does silica have with space?
« Reply #2 on: 02/05/2015 21:23:43 »
If any what connection is there to silica and space?


I am assuming you meant; "any connection between silica and space?"

The only connection we can find between silica and space is the same connection we observe about any other form of matter. Silica takes up space and has weight. Space is the place where we find all other forms of matter including silica as well.

I fail to see or understand why you would ask such a simple question. If you don't know the difference between space and matter, how are you ever going to learn anything here at TNS?

Maybe you should take up another hobby..................................
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What connections does silica have with space?
« Reply #3 on: 02/05/2015 23:27:14 »
If any what connection is there to silica and space?


I am assuming you meant; "any connection between silica and space?"

The only connection we can find between silica and space is the same connection we observe about any other form of matter. Silica takes up space and has weight. Space is the place where we find all other forms of matter including silica as well.

I fail to see or understand why you would ask such a simple question. If you don't know the difference between space and matter, how are you ever going to learn anything here at TNS?

Maybe you should take up another hobby..................................

I know the difference,  I just thought silica seemed a bit odd, because of glass and sand.
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What connections does silica have with space?
« Reply #4 on: 02/05/2015 23:44:07 »
Quote from: TheBox
If any what connection is there to silica and space?
Silica is thought to be a significant component of the protoplanetary disk surrounding some new stars.
In near the star (hotter than the orbit of Mercury), only elements like iron and nickel will condense as solids. This may be why most of Mercury's mass is its iron core, with relatively little silica.

Far out from the star (colder than Jupiter), water, carbon dioxide, ammonia and methane ices are additional components of the protoplanetary disk. This area forms small, icy objects like comets. Some grow massive enough to also hold hydrogen and helium, forming gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn.

In-between, silica will condense out, along with the metals, forming the rocky planets with an iron core, like Earth and Mars.

This silica which forms asteroids and Earth's crust is not transparent, as it contains many compounds from the periodic table. However, when it is heated well past its melting  point, and then allowed to cool slowly, it can form large, transparent, single crystals of silica. These include the natural quartz crystals we find on Earth, and smaller crystals which erode to sand. 
« Last Edit: 03/05/2015 04:03:05 by evan_au »
 

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Re: What connections does silica have with space?
« Reply #4 on: 02/05/2015 23:44:07 »

 

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