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Author Topic: Are there any inexpensive telescopes that connect to iPads or PCs?  (Read 4072 times)

Offline cheryl j

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My brother is interested in back yard astronomy. I was wondering what was available for capturing images cheaply.
« Last Edit: 10/05/2015 09:24:26 by chris »


 

Offline PmbPhy

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My brother is interested in back yard astronomy. I was wondering what was available for capturing images cheaply.
What is the dollar range of "inexpensive"? Some people would say that to mean ~$50 while others would say that to mean ~$500. It'd be nice to have a price range.

Does your brother have a tablet? There might be gizmo's to capture images using a tablet as the recording and storage device.
 

Offline RD

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Standard web-cameras can be fitted to telescopes ... http://nightskyinfocus.com/equipment/imaging-planets-using-webcams/

Registax (or similar) software is recommended ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Registax
« Last Edit: 10/05/2015 02:59:16 by RD »
 

Offline evan_au

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You can get astronomy apps for smartphones & tablets - they are very cheap. I have GoSkyWatch, but there are many others.

These apps bring up information about any object that you point the tablet at in the sky - and a much better picture of planets and star clusters than you could get through quite an expensive backyard telescope*!
 
The apps I have seen allow you to select an object that you want to see from a catalogue, and point you at the right part of the sky (or, if the target has already set, provide an X-Ray mode so you can see it through the bulk of the Earth!).

They use the internal compass, GPS and accelerometers to work out which direction the device is facing, and display a synchronised map of the sky; some of them even overlay an outline of the constellations.

You can then use the Hubble images on the internet to see really high-resolution images.

*Even a $200 backyard telescope gives a good image of the Moon, and allows you to see 4 moons of Jupiter. To see the rings Saturn as rings instead of bulges, you will need to spend a lot more money.

If you can only afford $50, a pair of binoculars may be a better way to start (and are probably better than Galileo's revolutionary telescope). They have the advantage that they are very portable, and can be used for many daytime terrestrial purposes (sport, nature, etc)
 

Offline cheryl j

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Right now he's using high powered military binoculars, but he may upgrade. 
« Last Edit: 11/05/2015 05:36:13 by cheryl j »
 

Offline Colin2B

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You can get eyepiece adapters for point and shoot and dslr cameras, but we have had success just holding ipad camera over microscope eyepiece.
For astro, worth looking at https://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2011/06/24/iphone-astrophotography-my-first-attempt/
 

Offline cheryl j

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That's pretty impressive for just a phone!
 

Offline Colin2B

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 P
That's pretty impressive for just a phone!
Particularly when you add the software RD mentioned.
It's worth remembering that most point&shoot are far higher quality than phone or tablet,  just less convenient.
 

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