The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?  (Read 1959 times)

Offline taregg

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 168
    • View Profile
Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« on: 15/05/2015 19:27:56 »
which isotopes required easy
 temperature  for nuckler fusion
T+T or D+D
and explain why....
« Last Edit: 15/05/2015 21:33:00 by chris »


 

Offline PmbPhy

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2762
  • Thanked: 38 times
    • View Profile
Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #1 on: 15/05/2015 23:57:59 »
Quote from: taregg
which isotopes required easy
 temperature  for nuckler fusion
T+T or D+D
and explain why....
Sometimes we can tell by how a question is phrased that it might be a homework question. We don't do other people's homework for them. However if you show us what you've done so far to solve this problem we might be able to help you solve it.
 

Offline taregg

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 168
    • View Profile
Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #2 on: 16/05/2015 09:34:33 »
this question is not homework
 

Offline evan_au

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4130
  • Thanked: 249 times
    • View Profile
Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #3 on: 16/05/2015 11:00:32 »
Have a look at the graph at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_fusion#Requirements
I think the answer is "neither"...

Of course, "easy" must be considered a relative term. I assume this means "at a lower temperature"?
 

Offline taregg

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 168
    • View Profile
Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #4 on: 16/05/2015 11:21:04 »
the more hard fusion isotopes together the more powerful energy produse.......and the more easy fusion isotopes together the more weak  energy that produce. ....is it correct
 

Offline evan_au

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4130
  • Thanked: 249 times
    • View Profile
Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #5 on: 18/05/2015 22:21:13 »
Quote from: taregg
(paraphrase):Is it true that the harder it is to fuse two isotopes together, the more powerful the energy it produces?
Not necessarily.
For a given amount of input energy, the easier it is to fuse two isotopes together, the more mass will fuse, and the greater the output energy.

Experimental nuclear fusion reactors are often tested with D+D fuel, which is hard to fuse, and produces almost no energy. This allows them to develop the methods to inject fuel, heat the fuel, contain the reaction, stop the reactor from melting and extract waste gases. Then, when they mave met their design objectives, they try D+T fuel, which is easier to fuse, and has a chance of producing enough heat energy to match the energy being injected; however, it contaminates the reactor, and makes maintenance and development much harder.

The problem with hydrogen fusion is that it is very hard to start, and very hard to control - the nearest contained source we have is the Sun.

Extending to a wider set of isotopes: It is very hard to fuse carbon nuclei together (it requires higher temperatures and higher pressures than Hydrogen, conditions which occur in the core of some large stars), but the energy it produces is small compared to fusing the same mass of hydrogen.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Which isotopes are required for nuclear fusion?
« Reply #5 on: 18/05/2015 22:21:13 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length