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Author Topic: Possible explanation for the higher incidence of MS in Doctors  (Read 20529 times)

ROBERT

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There is a higher incidence of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in certain professions, most notably doctors of medicine (MDs). It has been suggested that there is something about practicing medicine which causes doctors to develop MS, e.g. exposure to anaesthetic gases, (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=62.0).

I have an alternative hypothesis. I suggest that being a MD does not predispose a person to develop MS, but that the converse is true: having MS predisposes an individual to become a doctor of medicine.

This converse theory is not as absurd as it first appears. People have symptoms of MS many years, sometimes decades, before they are diagnosed with it. So true onset of MS can be in childhood/adolescence, (although diagnosis will be many years later). The demyelination of MS can cause hyperreflexia which can include emotional incontinence. Whilst full emotional incontinence is associated with the latter stages of MS, I suggest that a milder version of this emotional hyperreflexia could exist at the earliest stages of the disease, during childhood/adolescence.

This hypersensitivity would cause people with this condition to overreact to emotional stimuli, e.g. emotions, (including empathy), would be more readily evoked. Children/adolescents affected would be more sensitive to the emotional pressure from parents & peers to achieve academically, and consequently would be exceptionally diligent students.

So amongst people who have MS when children/adolescents, (although not diagnosed until many years later), this emotional hypersensitivity will create a disproportionately high number of academic high-achievers who are abnormally sensitive to the suffering of others, (hyper-empathic). Such individuals are predisposed to become doctors of medicine.

My MS =>MD theory is supported by the fact that there is a higher than normal incidence of MS in other empathic professions such as nurses & police, in academics generally and amongst high-achievers in the arts and industry (entrepreneurs).

The idea that certain neurological disorders can predispose individuals to enter certain professions is not original, e.g. aspergic mathematicians & bipolar artists.  However I have never heard it suggested as a possible explanation for the high incidence of MS in MDs.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 15:42:40 by ROBERT »


 

Offline iko

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Hi Robert,
I couldn't find confirmed evidence (transl.= more data) about MS in docs.
Surely these days only few of them are exposed to anesthetic gases.
They often work too much and tan too little...not to mention cod liver oil abstinence (I'm joking).
Find recent epidemiol. abstract you may have missed.
Ciao,

ikod

quote:

Epidemiology and natural history of multiple sclerosis: new insights.
Kantarci O, Wingerchuk D.
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The cause of multiple sclerosis remains elusive. We review recent epidemiological studies of genetic and environmental factors that influence susceptibility to the disease and its clinical course. RECENT FINDINGS: Genetic advances strengthen the association of multiple sclerosis with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 allele and interferon-gamma polymorphisms and suggest that apolipoprotein E alleles play an important role. In the environmental realm, nested case-control studies show that prior Epstein-Barr virus exposure is overrepresented in multiple sclerosis. Smoking has been associated with both risk of multiple sclerosis and progressive disease. Vitamin D deficiency might tie together environmental clues with higher multiple sclerosis prevalence rates; dietary vitamin supplementation is also associated with reduced multiple sclerosis risk. Natural history studies demonstrated dissociation between relapses and disease progression, facilitated the ability to distinguish neuromyelitis optica and related syndromes from typical multiple sclerosis, and spawned the exploration of large datasets to model long-term disease activity. SUMMARY: Our understanding of the contributions of specific genetic and environmental factors that contribute to multiple sclerosis has improved. Further refinements will eventually allow powerful longitudinal studies to assess genetic and environmental interactions with implications for prediction of individual disease susceptibility, clinical course, and response to therapy.

Curr Opin Neurol. 2006 Jun;19(3):248-54.

 

ROBERT

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Thanks Iko,
I suspected you would crowbar in a reference to the panacea of cod liver oil  :) .
More stats on the occupational associations of MS would be of interest.

I forgot to specifically mention school teachers as another group disproportionally affected by MS:
(they are academic and empathic):-

" Excess autoimmune disease mortality among school teachers "
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11469459&dopt=Citation
« Last Edit: 02/11/2006 16:35:19 by ROBERT »
 

Offline iko

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...and other recents bits may help...epidemiological studies.
There are many studies about vitamin D3 and prevention of immunoallergic encephalitis in mice, a widely accepted experimental model for MS.


Validity and reliability of adult recall of past sun exposure in a case-control study of multiple sclerosis.
van der Mei IA, Blizzard L, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T.

BACKGROUND: Measurement of past sun exposure through recall by adults has the potential for measurement error. We aimed to investigate aspects of validity and reliability of self-reported past sun exposure. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted in Tasmania on 136 cases with multiple sclerosis and 272 age- and sex-matched community controls. Repeat interviews on 52 cases and 52 controls were done on average 11 weeks after the initial interview. Sun exposure was assessed by questionnaire and lifetime calendar. Other measurements included serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, actinic damage, and skin phenotype. RESULTS: There was an association between recent sun exposure and serum vitamin D (time in the sun: r = 0.22, P < 0.01; activities outside: r = 0.31, P < 0.01 for controls) and between lifetime sun exposure and actinic damage [correlation between 0.34 (P < 0.01) and 0.17 (P = 0.01) for controls]. The test-retest weighted kappa statistic of self-reported sun exposure ranged from 0.43 to 0.74. Recall of childhood/adolescent sun exposure by standardized questioning was no less reproducible than recall of recent adult sun exposure and no less reliable when made with the calendar method. Comparing the questionnaire and calendar method, the measures of childhood/adolescent sun exposure had a similar predictive validity for multiple sclerosis. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide further evidence that adults are able to recall past sun exposure with shown validity and reliability and present information about the possible reasons for the good reliability of recalled sun exposure measures.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Aug;15(8):1538-44.


 

Offline iko

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Thanks Iko,
I suspected you would crowbar in a reference to the panacea of cod liver oil  :) .
More stats on the occupational associations of MS would be of interest.

There are epidemiological studies about increased incidence of childhood leukemia in families where one of the parents works in hospitals (doctors, nurses), but I'm much more interested in the effects of 1year of clo on the immune system: it's more practical and direct.  Time is money!
Cheers,

ikod

P.S. : Epidemiology helps a lot, but sometime makes you go around in circles (I don't know how you say that).
I remember when AIDS cause was still unknown, in the beginning of the '80s.
It was a very well known viral disease in monkeys and had exactly the same distribution observed in patients with HBV hepatitis (i.v. drug addicts, transfused pts, hemophiliacs). No need to epidemiologize around...just go and spot the nasty bug!
Unfortunately no virus had been found, so a viral etiology had been discarded.
Today I would say: infectious theories were a bit neglected...
Prestigious journals published 'evidences' suggesting different causes for such an immunological devastation: drug addicts were sniffing glues and blocking monocyte function, hemophiliacs had a block due to foreign proteins infused with Factor VIII and IX, transfused patients were confused by donors' leukocytes and so on.
It was not so difficult...we should have searched more in the same direction!
But for many it would have been a total waste of time and efforts.
Robert Gallo and Luc Montagnier had the guts, the authority and character to perseverate in AIDS viral research.
They had enough brains and experience to know that it had to be a viral disease.
« Last Edit: 04/11/2006 17:08:17 by iko »
 

ROBERT

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" [PDF] anaesthetists: a register based study The risk for multiple ...File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat
3 Detels R. Case control studies of multiple sclerosis. Neuroepidemiology. 1982;1:117. 4 Riise T, Wolfson C. The epidemiologic study of exogenous factors in ...
oem.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/63/6/387.pdf - Similar pages "

Radiologists:-
" Some studies also associate multiple sclerosis with radiological work "
http://www.ilo.org/encyclopaedia/?print&nd=857400162
« Last Edit: 02/11/2006 18:38:51 by ROBERT »
 

Offline iko

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Thank you Robert,
I read the abstract about nurses anaesthetists (and teachers!) and I see your point.
So I have one question ready for you: why should a volatile solvent be the cause?
If I support an overidden immune reaction to a persistent infectious pathogen, I know for sure that anaesthetists work for long hours (sometime most of the day) really close to their patients' breaths and all the air circulating in and out through mechanical ventilators.  Even more than surgeons they have a very close 'contact' with their patients...and their viruses and 'opportunistic' bacteria.
Few other healthcare professionals are so close to patients in crucial situations when the available self-protection devices are never enough safe.
Many critical patients carry hyperselected and antibiotic resistant germs that normal people will never encounter in all their lives!
Sorry Robert, but cod liver oil intoxication leads me to think 'out of the box' most of the time.

ikod
« Last Edit: 03/11/2006 23:40:43 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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New idea from ikod, who has never been an MS expert in his life, just an affectionate reader:

...Prior to the AIDS epidemic, Robert Gallo was the first to identify a human retrovirus and the only known human leukemia virus - HTLV - one of few known viruses shown to cause a human cancer. In 1976, he and his colleagues discovered Interleukin-2, which is a growth regulating substance now used as therapy in some cancers and sometimes AIDS. And in 1986, he and his group discovered the first new human herpes virus in more than 25 years (HHV-6), which was later shown to cause an infantile disease known as Roseola and currently is hypothesized as a strong suspect in the origin of multiple sclerosis.

from a short biography, type 1 page 1 life: http://www.ihv.org/bios/gallo.html


20yrs have past...   
« Last Edit: 02/11/2006 22:15:09 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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quote:

...The idea that certain neurological disorders can predispose individuals to enter certain professions is not original, e.g. aspergic mathematicians & bipolar artists.  However I have never heard it suggested as a possible explanation for the high incidence of MS in MDs.


...so poor starving people are depressed and develop silicosis from that...
(not to mention they spent most of their life in a coal mine...)
We surely must find the REAL cause of something.
Even if we are able to cure it 100percent!
Ciao Roberto! (my BIGboy is named like you)

ikod
 
« Last Edit: 02/11/2006 22:27:50 by iko »
 

another_someone

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I would suggest that one thing that doctors and teachers have in common is that both groups are exposed to a large number of members of the public, and are thus more likely to become infected with a wide range of infectious illnesses.
 

Offline iko

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I have an alternative hypothesis. I suggest that being a MD does not predispose a person to develop MS, but that the converse is true: having MS predisposes an individual to become a doctor of medicine.
...
So amongst people who have MS when children/adolescents, (although not diagnosed until many years later), this emotional hypersensitivity will create a disproportionately high number of academic high-achievers who are abnormally sensitive to the suffering of others, (hyper-empathic). Such individuals are predisposed to become doctors of medicine.
When I was a student, statistics showed that prestige and money moved more than 60% of the University students to choose the Medical School.  Things might have changed.
Hyper-empathic attitudes do not help much in the clinical practice. 

Dr. Gregory House
« Last Edit: 19/01/2007 23:19:47 by iko »
 

Offline daveshorts

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I have noticed that a lot of the medical students I know either have an interesting medical condition or are closely related to someone who has/had one. If MS is at all inherited this could be causing it...
 

Offline iko

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I have noticed that a lot of the medical students I know either have an interesting medical condition or are closely related to someone who has/had one. If MS is at all inherited this could be causing it...
daveshorts

Medical students are more interested and involved in studying various diseases and might pay much more attention to specific ailments affecting their relatives (at the 3rd, 4th degree...) or even their friends.  They might maximize their medical problems too, instead of keeping them private like most people do. It would be really tricky to search for something statistically sound.

from Childhood Leukemia topic:

...Studying homozygous twins lives from the cradle to the end of life we get lots of data about gene & environment interactions: if a certain disease is due to an inherited genetic defect, the incidence in twins will be much higher than in the general population. If the cause is mostly environmental, the incidence in twins will be similar to the control population.

As far as I could read, the incidence of MS in identical twins has not been reported much higher than the rest of the poeple, suggesting that multiple environmental factors are probably responsible for this chronic neurological disease.
MS could be quite similar to an autoimmune disease, as widely reported in the literature.

...one out of many (and more recent) papers:
Multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis
...The association of multiple sclerosis with other autoimmune diseases is infrequent but supports the immune hypothesis of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.
from: Roquer J. et al.  J. Neurol. 234(1):23-24;1987.

ikod
http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1024783.htm
Hooops!...sorry,ok, ok, I won't do it again...
« Last Edit: 05/11/2006 11:45:46 by iko »
 

another_someone

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I have noticed that a lot of the medical students I know either have an interesting medical condition or are closely related to someone who has/had one. If MS is at all inherited this could be causing it...

I have certainly noticed this tendency in psychiatrists.


Then again, could we not argue that most people probably are related to someone who has an interesting medical condition - but medical students may simply talk about it more.  I think it goes without saying that we are all related to someone who died.
 

ROBERT

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I would suggest that one thing that doctors and teachers have in common is that both groups are exposed to a large number of members of the public, and are thus more likely to become infected with a wide range of infectious illnesses.

The excess human contact theory would not explain those whose whose MS was diagnosed whilst they were in training to become doctors/nurses/police/teacher, (my hyper-empathic theory would explain it):-

Kim Bowerman was in the middle of a series of exams for the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy in March, 1990. She was twenty-five years old and planned to join the South Bend, Indiana police force.
"Suddenly, I was incredibly dizzy every time I stood up," Ms. Bowerman remembers. "I lost about twenty pounds because I couldn't keep any food down. The right side of my body seemed to be numb. I was sent to a neurologist. He said I either had a brain tumor or multiple sclerosis. I prayed for MS
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0850/is_n2_v11/ai_14276055

Aren't shopworkers (e.g. the people in Mc Donalds), exposed to a greater number of humans than teachers/doctors/nurses ?
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 14:12:38 by ROBERT »
 

ROBERT

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Thank you Robert,
I read the abstract about nurses anaesthetists (and teachers!) and I see your point.
So I have one question ready for you: why should a volatile solvent be the cause?
If I support an overidden immune reaction to a persistent infectious pathogen, I know for sure that anaesthetists work for long hours (sometime most of the day) really close to their patients' breaths and all the air circulating in and out through mechanical ventilators.  Even more than surgeons they have a very close 'contact' with their patients...and their viruses and 'opportunistic' bacteria.
Few other healthcare professionals are so close to patients in crucial situations when the available self-protection devices are never enough safe.
Many critical patients carry hyperselected and antibiotic resistant germs that normal people will never encounter in all their lives!
Sorry Robert, but cod liver oil intoxication leads me to think 'out of the box' most of the time.

ikod

Iko, I am not suggesting that anesthetics cause MS, nor any other medical practice, such as exposure to infected patients. My theory is that MS predisposes people to become doctors, nurses, teachers & police officers, by causing them to become hyper-empathic as children-adolescents.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 14:10:45 by ROBERT »
 

ROBERT

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"Further information about disabilities experienced by medical students and
doctors comes from a survey of deans of medical schools, postgraduate deans,
associate postgraduate deans and regional advisors in general practice carried out by
a working party convened by the BritishMedical Association (BMA) (British Medical
Association, 1997). A long list of physical diseases was collated. The conditions
reported most frequently were
paraplegia, hearing impairment, multiple sclerosis,
visual impairment, hemiplegia and epilepsy. More than half of the respondents had
their condition prior to, or developed the condition during, training at medical
school....
Multiple sclerosis is relatively common, usually beginning in the early years of
working life. In any deanery or NHS region it is likely that there will be several
junior doctors and two or three career grade doctors, either in hospital practice or
in general practice, with the condition. Its nature is variable. Relapses may occur
intermittently, causing periods of temporary unfitness followed by long periods of
fitness to practise. Other cases progress more steadily.."

www.radcliffe-oxford.com/books/samplechapter/7661/01_maintext_Cox.pdf


Note: Paraplegia, hemiplegia, seizures, deafness and visual impairment, are all symptoms of MS.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 17:17:40 by ROBERT »
 

Offline iko

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Hi Robert,
I stay with the infectious hypothesis and an overidden immune response to a common pathogen.  This is the same hypothesis to explain autoimmune diseases.
There is no congenital predisposition (omozygous twins).
Of course we may find predisposing factors like hormones, sex, enzyme defects; but the main role is probably played by environmental factors like infections, stress, diet, toxics and...sunshine.
MS doesn't strike in a restricted area of the central nervous system, but here and there in the myelin-rich white matter.
Hypothesizing a predisposed brain with peculiar differences in very specific areas of the brain (and not spinal cord) that would condition such a particular behaviour (amygdala, frontal cortex?) BEFORE the onset of a disease like MS is...quite difficult in this setting.
As in the leukemia issue the point could be: why don't we reccomend vitamin D for these patients?
Even if the disease is already present, wouldn't a protective effect (demonstrated in normal people) give positive results over the years in these patients? We should go for this, the lot of us!
Don't you think?

ikod

I'm quite sure that shop keepers do not meet the bulk of nasty bugs that nurses and doctors deal with every day.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 19:19:28 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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There is not much in PubMed about MS and VitD3.
It might be another neglected area of investigation.
Have got nothing to loose? Let's go for it then!

Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.
Hayes CE, Cantorna MT, DeLuca HF.
Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison 53706, USA.
Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1997 Oct;216(1):21-7.

Recently, it has been clearly demonstrated that exogenous 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, can completely prevent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted mouse model of human multiple sclerosis (MS). This finding has focused attention on the possible relationship of this disease to vitamin D. Although genetic traits certainly contribute to MS susceptibility, an environmental factor is also clearly involved. It is our hypothesis that one crucial environmental factor is the degree of sunlight exposure catalyzing the production of vitamin D3 in skin, and, further, that the hormonal form of vitamin D3 is a selective immune system regulator inhibiting this autoimmune disease. Thus, under low-sunlight conditions, insufficient vitamin D3 is produced, limiting production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, providing a risk for MS. Although the evidence that vitamin D3 is a protective environmental factor against MS is circumstantial, it is compelling. This theory can explain the striking geographic distribution of MS, which is nearly zero in equatorial regions and increases dramatically with latitude in both hemispheres. It can also explain two peculiar geographic anomalies, one in Switzerland with high MS rates at low altitudes and low MS rates at high altitudes, and one in Norway with a high MS prevalence inland and a lower MS prevalence along the coast. Ultraviolet (UV) light intensity is higher at high altitudes, resulting in a greater vitamin D3 synthetic rate, thereby accounting for low MS rates at higher altitudes. On the Norwegian coast, fish is consumed at high rates and fish oils are rich in vitamin D3. Further, experimental work on EAE provides strong support for the importance of vitamin D3 in reducing the risk and susceptibility for MS. If this hypothesis is correct, then 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or its analogs may have great therapeutic potential in patients with MS. More importantly, current research together with data from migration studies opens the possibility that MS may be preventable in genetically susceptible individuals with early intervention strategies that provide adequate levels of hormonally active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or its analogs.

...and so almost 10yrs have past (why medical progress is so slow?...it could be a new topic!)
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 19:58:16 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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I forgot to insist on this point:

Iko, I am not suggesting that anesthetics cause MS, nor any other medical practice, such as exposure to infected patients. My theory is that MS predisposes people to become doctors, nurses, teachers & police officers, by causing them to become hyper-empathic as children-adolescents

...I ignore how many nurses, doctors or medical students you have met so far.
I spent my last 33yrs in this battlefield and didn't find all this hyper-empathism you mentioned.
You actually tend to protect your soul and become really tough over the years.

iko     
« Last Edit: 06/11/2006 22:41:08 by iko »
 

ROBERT

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Hi Robert,
Hypothesizing a predisposed brain with peculiar differences in very specific areas of the brain (and not spinal cord) that would condition such a particular behaviour
(amygdala, frontal cortex?) BEFORE the onset of a disease like MS is...quite difficult in this setting.

ikod

Emotional Incontinence, a.k.a. Emotional Lability is common in MS.
" Emotional symptoms are common and can be the normal response to having a debilitating disease or the result of damage to the nerves that generate and control emotions."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labile_affect

My suggestion was that the true onset of MS was many years, even decades, before diagnosis, and a lesser form of this emotional lability could exist at this early stage, (in childhood / adolescence).

I forgot to insist on this point:
...I ignore how many nurses, doctors or medical students you have met so far.
I spent my last 33yrs in this battlefield and didn't find all this hyper-empathism you mentioned.
You actually tend to protect your soul and become really tough over the years.

iko     

I am not suggesting all doctors hyper-empathic, IIRC the incidence of MS in MDs is quadruple the normal incidence, so we are discussing something which affects approx 0.5% of MDs.
« Last Edit: 07/11/2006 15:32:25 by ROBERT »
 

another_someone

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Ofcourse, if sunlight is a factor mitigating against MS, then the population wide average, which includes sub-populations that do outdoor work, would be different from selecting sub-populations of people who work long hours away from sunlight.  Those with a propensity for careers that require extensive university training may already be spanning long hours indoors reading books long before they get to graduating as doctors.
 

another_someone

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Medical students are more interested and involved in studying various diseases and might pay much more attention to specific ailments affecting their relatives (at the 3rd, 4th degree...) or even their friends.  They might maximize their medical problems too, instead of keeping them private like most people do. It would be really tricky to search for something statistically sound.

This would inevitably be true is early stage desease, but would probably have less of an impact on late state desease.  The question has to be whether there are any statistics about the probability of debilitating MS (ignoring the early stage desease) that would be likely to be diagnosed no matter who the patient was.

As far as I could read, the incidence of MS in identical twins has not been reported much higher than the rest of the poeple, suggesting that multiple environmental factors are probably responsible for this chronic neurological disease.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis
Quote
In the population at large, the chance of developing MS is less than a tenth of one percent. However, if one person in a family has MS, that person's first-degree relatives—parents, children, and siblings—have a one to three percent chance of getting the disease.

For identical twins, the likelihood that the second twin may develop MS if the first twin does is about 30%; for fraternal twins (who do not inherit identical gene pools), the likelihood is closer to that for non-twin siblings, or about 4%. The fact that the rate for identical twins both developing MS is significantly less than 100% suggests that the disease is not entirely genetically controlled. Some (but definitely not all) of this effect may be due to shared exposure to something in the environment, or to the fact that some people with MS lesions remain essentially asymptomatic throughout their lives.

Further indications that more than one gene is involved in MS susceptibility comes from studies of families in which more than one member has MS. Several research teams found that people with MS inherit certain regions on individual genes more frequently than people without MS. Of particular interest is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6. HLAs are genetically determined proteins that influence the immune system.

The HLA patterns of MS patients tend to be different from those of people without the disease. Investigations in northern Europe and America have detected three HLAs that are more prevalent in people with MS than in the general population. Studies of American MS patients have shown that people with MS also tend to exhibit these HLAs in combination-that is, they have more than one of the three HLAs-more frequently than the rest of the population. Furthermore, there is evidence that different combinations of the HLAs may correspond to variations in disease severity and progression.

Studies of families with multiple cases of MS and research comparing genetic regions of humans to those of mice with EAE suggest that another area related to MS susceptibility may be located on chromosome 5. Other regions on chromosomes 2, 3, 7, 11, 17, 19, and X have also been identified as possibly containing genes involved in the development of MS.

These studies strengthen the theory that MS is the result of a number of factors rather than a single gene or other agent. Development of MS is likely to be influenced by the interactions of a number of genes, each of which (individually) has only a modest effect. Additional studies are needed to specifically pinpoint which genes are involved, determine their function, and learn how each gene's interactions with other genes and with the environment make an individual susceptible to MS.
 

ROBERT

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I have noticed that a lot of the medical students I know either have an interesting medical condition or are closely related to someone who has/had one. If MS is at all inherited this could be causing it...

I have certainly noticed this tendency in psychiatrists.


MS sufferers include psychiatrists:-

" Alexander (Sandy) Burnfield
Date of Birth: 5th December 1944
Year of Diagnosis: 1969
Occupation: Consultant in Child and Family Psychiatry
Country of Residence: UK
Type of MS: Secondary Progressive (currently stable)
Sex: Male

I first realised I might have MS when I was a 20 year old medical student in 1965. Although there wasn’t a definite diagnosis at the time, the first symptom - blurred vision in my left eye - was indicative of MS. Then there was little information available and MS wasn’t talked about. I therefore discovered the implications of my condition by studying textbooks in the medical school library. It was a big shock. "
http://www.msif.org/en/people_with_ms/people_profiles/profile_of_the.html
« Last Edit: 07/11/2006 16:32:33 by ROBERT »
 

another_someone

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I have noticed that a lot of the medical students I know either have an interesting medical condition or are closely related to someone who has/had one. If MS is at all inherited this could be causing it...

I have certainly noticed this tendency in psychiatrists.


MS sufferers include psychiatrists:-

Sorry, I think you misunderstood me (my fault, I was too ambiguous) - what I meant is that I find many psychiatrists have psychiatric problems, and this may well have been a factor that lead them into psychiatry (although whether this is in the patenits best interest is another matter).
 

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