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Author Topic: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?  (Read 1233 times)

Offline RTCPhysics

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An Alternative Theory of Gravity.

The basic idea behind this theory of ‘gravity’ is the existence throughout the universe of a ‘cubic lattice’ of particles. These particles are undetectable with current sensors, but we walk through them every day and they create the gravitational force that we feel. They may be small, but they have the capability of inter-particle attraction.

There is one particle located at each node of the lattice and what is novel about this structure is that they alternate in ‘sign’ along any line of the lattice. Hence each particle of a particular 'sign' has six particles of the opposite sign located at each of its adjoining nodes: four on the same plane, one above and one below.

All six attract the central particle towards themselves and as they are all an equal distance apart and have the same magnitude of ‘charge’, they create an equilibrium of forces upon the central particle. What is an interesting property of this structure is that if you switch from this central particle to any one of its neighbours, you find that it too has six neighbouring particles of opposite sign. So the whole cubic lattice is completely stable and flexible.

The equilibrium of the lattice is only disturbed, when a body of matter is introduced into it and through its presence, the body of matter creates a gravitational field around itself. So consider an atom being inserted into the cubic lattice. The particles of the lattice where the atom has been inserted, are displaced out of their original locations to make way for the atom, its nucleus and its electrons. The links between these displaced particles and their neighbours remain intact around and through the atom and as they still attract each other, this creates an inwardly directed force from all directions upon the atom, as the particles are pulled back towards their original positions within the lattice structure.

There is an assumption here that the nucleus and the electrons of the atom are not impervious to the force field between the displaced lattice particles, just like they are not impervious to magnetic and electrostatic forces.

The addition of another atom into the lattice creates a molecule and the distortion process repeats itself with more particles displaced outwards from their original locations. The links between the displaced lattice particles remain intact acting both between and around the two atoms of the molecule, but this displacement weakens their attracting force as they are now further apart. To compensate for this effect, the displaced particles have been moved nearer to the next outer tier of particles in the lattice around the molecule and because of their nearer proximity to each other, the first and second tiers are drawn together more strongly.

This increased attraction between the first and second tier is held in check by the inter-particle attraction from the third, fourth and other outer tiers of particles around the molecule. This process of adjustment of the lattice around the molecule is experienced from all directions by every tier of particles around the inserted molecule, all being drawn in towards the molecule at the centre, but the effect falling off with distance from the molecule.

By extending this process through the addition of further molecules, a large body of matter can be created. The compression of the lattice particles intensifies with each molecule addition, starting from zero at the centre, growing to a maximum at the surface of the body of matter where the distortion is greatest and falling off in intensity out into the lattice space around it. This is the effect we call gravity.

To illustrate how the attracting force between two bodies of matter works, we can insert a second body of matter into the space around the first body of matter, but within its region of influence. The same process of lattice displacement occurs around the second body of matter to create its gravitational force, but with one difference. The second body of matter has been inserted into an area of the lattice which has already been compressed by the presence of the first body of matter and the two compressed lattice fields butt up against each other. As their force fields cannot overlap each other, they are compressed closely together and this close proximity of lattice particles creates a strong attracting force between the two bodies of matter at the point of contact of their gravitational fields. This force pulls them in towards their mutual centre of gravity, acting along a line connecting their two centre points.

The size of this attracting force depends upon the masses of the two bodies of matter and their distance apart. If left to this force, they will collide, just as other matter does in our universe. The only source of escape is if one body of matter is moving at the ‘escape velocity’ needed to counter this attraction.

What takes getting used to with this concept of a universal lattice of particles, is the dynamic nature of this force of gravity for a moving object. Consider, for example, our earth orbiting the sun. At any point in its orbit, it displaces the lattice particles within and around itself creating its own gravity, but as it moves on in its orbit, the lattice reforms behind it and the lattice in front is displaced recreating its gravitational field once again.

So when you go for a walk on earth, recognize that this is what is happening to you. The displacement of the lattice particles, caused by your own body mass also enters the earth’s surface under your feet and because the lattice surrounding the earth and through which you are walking, has already created its own centrally directed gravitational force, you find yourself attracted to the earth’s surface. And the bigger you are, the greater is the mutual gravitational attraction.

Whether this particle lattice really exists is for our experimenters to discover, but if the deducting reasoning used above is sound, then it seems the particle lattice really could exist.
« Last Edit: 15/06/2015 08:41:06 by RTCPhysics »


 

Offline RTCPhysics

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Re: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?
« Reply #1 on: 10/06/2015 13:07:51 »
I have been hoping for some responses or questions, perhaps along the following lines.

Does this particle lattice theory of gravity explain any of the following:
1. The existence of gravitational waves.
2. The bending of light in a gravitational field.
3. The uniform velocity of planets around a star.
4. The movement of galaxies away from each other.
5. The presence of dark matter and dark energy.
6. How does it stack up against the explanations given by Einstein's 'General Theory of Relativity'.

I'm fully aware that the next serious step in 'proof of concept', is to build a mathematical model and use ranges of parameters for the size of the particles, their interacting forces and the distance between nodes, in order to test its results against real planetary systems such as our sun. But with an idea at this early stage of development, an informal process of appraisal from forum participants who have an interest in the field of astrophysics, could determine fairly quickly, whether it will sink or swim. That help would be much appreciated.



« Last Edit: 15/06/2015 08:32:49 by RTCPhysics »
 

Offline RTCPhysics

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Re: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?
« Reply #2 on: 19/06/2015 11:09:08 »
With no help arriving, I am stuck with answering them myself. I’ll try to use as few words as possible.
 
1.   Gravitational waves is the easiest to answer, because with a physical structure in place, the disturbance created within the particle lattice from two galaxies colliding will be transmitted outwards through the lattice.
 
2.   The bending of light photons in the gravitational field around a body of matter is much the same as visible light passing through other translucent materials. The compression of the lattice of particles around a body of matter, such as a star or galaxy, will have a refractive capability that is greater than the lattice in its undistorted state and hence bend the light’s path.
 
3.   The straight forward answer to this is that all the orbiting planets were subjected to the same accelerating and decelerating forces at the time of their creation, so their orbital velocities will be the same. In a star system, the gravitational attraction of the central star is the main force that counteracts the centrifugal force of the planets’ orbiting motion, but it does not affect the planets orbital velocity. It is the gravitational forces between the planets that keep each other in their orbits in a stable manner. If a planet is subjected to an accelerating force from say, an asteroid collision, this will initially increase its orbital velocity, but it is immediately counteracted by the gravitational attraction it experiences from each of the other planets in orbit. The effect, therefore, of this 'gravitational coupling' between planets is to distribute the increase in energy amongst them all.

To regain their stability, there will be changes to each planets’ location within its orbit and also to their orbits, if the collision is large enough, but their orbital velocities will return to being a common value under this counter balancing action of the gravitational attracting forces. Clearly, if the collision is violent enough, a planet could be expelled from the system, but to achieve this it has to overcome the combined gravitation attraction it experiences from the star and that of the other planets.
 
4.   The answer to this question of galactic movement depends upon whether the universe is a contained environment or an open one. If it is an open one, as is currently thought, then the movement of galaxies away from each other in an expanding universe, can be explained by the imbalance of gravitational forces in the particle lattice at the edge of the universe. The outermost galaxies will create a gravitational force within and behind themselves from their compression of the particle lattice, whereas ahead of them, there is no lattice network to provide a counterbalancing force. Hence the galaxies at the edge of the universe are propelled outwards by this imbalance of their own gravitational force. As part of this outwards motion, they drag the next inner layer of galaxies outwards through their gravitational attraction. And this repeats to the centre.

5.   Dark matter and dark energy could be explained by the compressed presence of the particles in the lattice around and between galaxies.

6.   Einstein’s theories of ‘special and general relativity’ rely upon the manipulation of space and time to arrive at the concept of a ‘gravitational hollow’ created by the presence of a body of matter in the 'vacuum of space'. In our own solar system, the sun creates the largest 'spherically shaped' hollow and the planets, also sited in their own but smaller hollows, orbit around the sun on differing inside contours of the sun's spatial hollow, which creates the effect of a gravitational force towards the sun. The same is true for the moon circling around the earth inside the earth's spatial hollow.

This three dimensional perception of a star system as being contained within a spherical hollow in the vacuum of space has to be compared to the particle lattice perception of space, where stars and their planets orbit in space held by gravitational forces created through their own distortions of the 'universal particle lattice'.

The essence of Einstein’s theories is that they rely upon the non-physical concepts of space and time. Both of these concepts were invented by humans, so we can alter them to function as we wish. For example, time could be allowed not just to go forwards, but backwards or even stop, if you want it to. It could even do a ‘loop the loop’ to return to where you started having experienced the future, if you wanted it to. Similarly, ‘intervals of time’ can be squashed or stretched, as Einstein did to explain the constant speed of light in his special theory of relativity. No other entity: animal, vegetable or mineral needs these concepts to have an existence.  Even the universe didn't need them to create itself.

So I leave you with the thought.  As you go for a walk on planet earth: "Is the concept of a spherically shaped hollow created within the vacuum of space, holding your feet to the ground or is it the outcome of the spatial distortion that you and the earth have created together within a universal lattice of particles?  Or is it something else?
« Last Edit: 21/06/2015 08:44:11 by RTCPhysics »
 

Offline RTCPhysics

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Re: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?
« Reply #3 on: 05/01/2016 18:11:09 »
"What takes getting used to with this concept of a universal lattice of particles, is the dynamic nature of this force of gravity for a moving object. Consider, for example, our earth orbiting the sun. At any point in its orbit, it displaces the lattice particles within and around itself creating its own gravity, but as it moves on in its orbit, the lattice reforms behind it and the lattice in front is displaced recreating its gravitational field once again."

An implication of this 'WIMP particle lattice model' is that the reforming of the particle lattice behind a moving body of matter should be detectable. Scientists at Durham University observing a galaxy in motion, believe they have found evidence of dark matter trailing behind it.     
 

Offline GoC

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Re: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?
« Reply #4 on: 05/01/2016 21:06:06 »
Can you account for the quantum flow of electrons in atoms?

I have a lattice idea for wimp particles also. Two different sets of lattice cubes 45 degrees apart in 2d slices of space. The wimp particles spin at c. Complimentary spins within each cube so they spin like gears rotating together. One 2d section is perpendicular spin state to the next that is offset by the 45 degrees. This creates a situation where the electron rotates like it would around a string. Gravity would be the increased expansion between the cubes as dilation of energy. Mass would be attracted to the most dilated space in the center of mass.

A atom (Proton) would dilate space and send out an electron until the less dilated space forces the electron to curve back to the more dilated space of the proton as a cycle. One would need to consider protons and neutrons made up of positrons and negatrons, matter and anti-matter in a stable flow of dilated space. This is just to far off main stream to be taken seriously. Main stream will fumble around for many, many years before they realize they have left themselves with nothing to work with as building blocks of relativity. Spacetime, dark mass energy and virtual mass will occupy their need with out actually having anything concrete to work with.



While I find it very interesting we both view space as a lattice I find we need to incorporate c into the lattice to accommodate motion itself.

Omni?
 

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Re: Is a particle lattice theory an explanation of gravity?
« Reply #4 on: 05/01/2016 21:06:06 »

 

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