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Author Topic: Could we cook bullfrogs?  (Read 2148 times)

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Could we cook bullfrogs?
« on: 12/06/2015 19:04:38 »
Watching a BBC program lamenting the problems caused by the introduction of bull frogs into British ponds, reminded me of pleasant summer evenings gigging frogs.

A frog gig is a small trident with maybe a 10 foot shaft. Bull Frogs eyes shine when you point a flash light at them so it's easy to collect all of them in a pond. You don't even need to trap them like crawdads.

Here is a recipe for Cajun Bullfrog legs.... Laissez les bon temps roller!

http://www.realcajuncooking.com/2011/07/cajun-fried-bullfrog-legs.html

« Last Edit: 12/06/2015 19:41:10 by chris »


 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #1 on: 13/06/2015 09:20:00 »
Don't try this recipe with the invading cane toads taking over Australia!
They have poison glands, and will kill anything that eats them...
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #2 on: 13/06/2015 15:36:23 »
Wasn't there an English King that died from eating a whole mess of lampreys?

Lamprey pie.... yum - yum. Would you want malt vinegar with that?

As I recall the frog legs tasted pretty good. We breaded them and fried them up like catfish.
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #3 on: 09/07/2015 15:41:31 »
Bill, you seem to be set on eating everything that moves......
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #4 on: 09/07/2015 18:31:18 »
"Frogs legs prepared with butter, garlic and parsley sauce and then served with salad are a must. 3000 to 4000 tons of cuisses de grenouilles are consumed annually in France, that represents around 80 million frogs.(1')

Well, Hoss, I couldn't blame anybody for thinking that British food is a sad joke, In France the government had to impose a bag limit on taking frogs. On the other hand "les rosbifs" are bemoaning the "devastation" caused by the invasion of these tasty (and free) num-nums.

 I understand that the Tory government is opening the UK's coffers to help the disadvantaged so perhaps the misfortunates of Britain live too high on the hog to eat frog legs nowadays.

I have a plan to turn the Somerset marshes into a revenue stream by the export of bull  frog legs to the continent. Perhaps the funds could be used to cut university tuition fees.



(1.)http://www.regions-of-france.com/regions/paris_ile_de_france/food-gastronomy/frogs-legs-cuisses-grenouilles/
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #5 on: 10/07/2015 00:14:40 »

Well, Hoss, I couldn't blame anybody for thinking that British food is a sad joke,

I beg to differ. It's about the only thing here that isn't a sad joke.

Though as UK processed food is gradually taken over by Kraft, Heinz, Hershey, Coca Cola and Mars, and MacDonalds and Burger King seem to have discovered ways of making Irish beef as pointless as its American cousins, some aspects of UK nutrition are indeed becoming sad, but far from a joke.

Never mind bullfrogs, our supermarkets (and, sadly, Subway - the best thing to come out of America since my girlfriend) are now being invaded by "pulled pork". In Chicago it looks, feels and tastes exactly like carpet, so I won't be trying it here (or was I really, really drunk?). AFAIK there are two kinds of American food: Maine lobster (delicious), and the other stuff (not). Which is probably why she emigrated. 

Seek not the mote in thy brother's eye, pardner, but consider the beam in thine own.   
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #6 on: 10/07/2015 02:28:14 »
I saw a program once where Londoners were going nuts over "jellied eels". I see no reason for people who eat that to turn up their noses at Frog's legs. There was lately a series on the BBC in which a family was subjected to the diets common to every decade since 1950-- for a week. The fifties were hideous, but the 90's were no great shakes either. Brown bread and drippings, cheese and pickle -- really?

"Pulled Pork" was the child of Madison Avenue because white people wouldn't eat those tough cuts of pork since pork chops were so cheap. A similar phenomenon is the "fajita" since nobody in their right mind would eat beef flank steak when you could get a T-bone for a dollar more.

Your knowledge of real American regional cooking is woefully inadequate. I recommend, "The Food of a Younger Land: A portrait of American food- before the national highway system, before chain restaurants, and before frozen food, when the nation's food was seasonal,regional, and traditional  - From the lost WPA files.

Amazon is currently selling a used copy for a penny.

During the depression the WPA paid unemployed writers in America to write about local culture. This is some of the result. Many of them achieved later fame.

I am persuaded that the Kentucky Burgoo can hold it's own with a Lancashire hotpot. Furthermore a well made "Manhattan Clam Chowder" -as described therein - will beat any British soup except for Mulligatawny (perhaps)and that is an immigrant.
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #7 on: 10/07/2015 02:51:07 »
As an illustration of the varied tapestry of American food, here is a recipe for Minnesota "Booya" (1.)

NB: This dish would be served at some community diinner.


Backyard Booya

5 lbs. meaty soup bones
2 lbs. oxtails
5 lbs. stewing chicken
4 lbs. meaty neck bones (beef)
2 lbs. carrots, sliced
6 large onions, cut up
Large stalk celery, cut up
6 large potatoes, diced
1 large cabbage, cut up
1 can whole kernel corn
1 can peas, drained
1 can green lima beans
1 can cut green beans
1 can cut yellow beans
3 cans tomatoes

Cook the soup bones just until meat is tender. Using a large
canning kettle add beef broth and fill with water, so it is 3/4
full. Add the rest of the uncooked meat and chicken.
Cook until meat falls off bones. Bone all meat and remove chicken
skin. (Discard skin).
Cut meat in pieces. Place broth on stove to simmer. Add onions,
celery, carrots, cabbage and potatoes. Cook for 2 hours. Add all
canned vegetables. Bring to a slow boil, stirring constantly.
Add all the meat. Cook slowly for another 2 hours. In a square
piece of cheesecloth put about 6 cloves of garlic, a good handful
of marjoram and bay leaves. Tie and put in with the vegetables.
Salt and pepper to taste. Paprika and other spices may be added,
if desired.

This recipe comes from the "Favorite Recipes of Sokol Minnesota,
Czech-American"
published by Sokol Minnesota, 383 Michingan St., St. Paul, MN 55102

(1.) http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m1223F05.htm
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #8 on: 10/07/2015 10:31:26 »
I rest my case.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #9 on: 10/07/2015 10:43:11 »
But seriously, the average calorie intake of the UK population has decreased since the 1950s and we are subject to all sorts of official guidance about salt, fruit, fibre, dairy products, sell-by dates,  and Lord knows what else, and the nutritional health of the population is apparently at an all-time low.

As a native East Ender, I was raised on jellied eels, whale steak (it was wartime), calf's head brawn, Woolton pie (mainly carrot - another wartime delicacy), tripe and onions, and every possible variety of herring. Wonderful stuff to rebuild a devastated nation.

And I'll admit to loving chowder. So here's one for the pot:

Woman arrives at Logan airport, homesick and hungry. Jumps into a taxi and says "take me somewhere I can get scrod".

Taxi driver says "So you're a Harvard alumna".

"How do you know?"   

"Nobody else uses the pluperfect subjunctive."
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #10 on: 10/07/2015 16:50:57 »
I understand that there is quite a good library in London. Perhaps you can find a copy of "How to Cook a Wolf", by M K Fisher. John updike called her, "The poet of the appetites"

She wrote this book to advise people how to maintain nutrition under rationing. The signature dish is called "Sludge" and is said to be the cheapest way to keep body and soul together indefinitely. It has been said that it is fairly palatable if fried up like scrapple. The instructions start with, "First borrow fifty cents.."

I will see your Woolton Pie and raise you a bowl of sludge.

 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #11 on: 10/07/2015 23:36:48 »
Sadly, wolves are extinct in Britain, but the spirit of Elsie Widdowson lives on.
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #12 on: 11/07/2015 01:08:24 »
 "Widdowson lived in Barrington near Cambridge for over 50 years. She ate a simple diet, including butter and eggs, and attributed her longevity to good genes: her father lived to 96 and her mother to 107. She died at Addenbrooke's Hospital after suffering a stroke while on holiday with her sister in Ireland. She never married."
[Wikipedia, "Elsie Widdowson"]

If I pass away at 94 while on vacation in Ireland I will count myself more fortunate than most.
 

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Re: Could we cook bullfrogs?
« Reply #12 on: 11/07/2015 01:08:24 »

 

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