The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 448322 times)

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #400 on: 30/01/2007 04:34:46 »
The styrophone is a modern musical instrument made from a Styrofoam (expanded polystyrene foam) box that is forced to vibrate by friction against a wooden stick. Technically, the instrument is a type of friction idiophone. Styrophones tend to last for only one performance, as the friction destroys the material.
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #401 on: 30/01/2007 04:56:02 »
Interesting.. Never heard of them..

Telescopes
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #402 on: 30/01/2007 13:41:51 »
Palatine Uvula






Diagram showing the uvula, tonsils, soft palate, and tongue


The uvula (IPA: [ˈjuːvjʊlə]) is a small, mucosa-covered set of muscles, musculus uvulae, hanging down from the soft palate, near the back of the throat. The word is derived from the diminutive of uva, the Latin word for "grape", due to the uvula's grape-like shape.

If the uvula is touched by a finger or other object, this will induce an unpleasant gagging sensation which is often followed by vomiting. This is often how bulimics induce vomiting.
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #403 on: 30/01/2007 15:27:52 »
Virtual Reality
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #404 on: 30/01/2007 19:13:57 »
Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome



Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome


Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is a syndrome of pre-excitation of the ventricles of the heart due to an accessory pathway known as the Bundle of Kent. This accessory pathway is an abnormal electrical communication from the atria to the ventricles.

The incidence of WPW syndrome is between 0.1 and 3 % of the general population.[1] [2] [3]

While the vast majority of individuals with WPW syndrome remain asymptomatic throughout their entire lives, there is a risk of sudden death associated with the syndrome. Sudden death due to WPW syndrome is rare (incidence of ≤0.6%[3] [4]), and is due to the effect of the accessory pathway on tachyarrhythmias in these individuals

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
for more reading and learning click here:    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolff-Parkinson-White_syndrome
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 16:33:15 by iko »
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #405 on: 30/01/2007 19:26:09 »
Zuzzurellone


Naoo spello tees wan deer friendo!
...The last italian word in our Dictionary.
Nothing to do with Science...so give me
another Z!
« Last Edit: 22/04/2007 09:39:07 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #406 on: 30/01/2007 22:19:26 »
Asbestos is well bad for ewe !!


Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos "quicklime" from Greek ἄσβεστος: a, "not" and sbestos, "extinguishable") describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. These minerals, together with their occurrences, uses, and associated hazards, have been discussed in detail by Guthrie and Mossman (1993).

The name is derived for its historical use in lamp wicks; the resistance of asbestos to fire has long been exploited for a variety of purposes. Asbestos was used in fabrics such as Egyptian burial cloths and Charlemagne's tablecloth (which according to legend, he threw in a fire to clean). Asbestos occurs naturally in many forms (see below); it is mined from metamorphic rocks.

When asbestos is used for its resistance to fire or heat, the fibers are often mixed with cement or woven into fabric or mats. Asbestos is used in brake shoes and gaskets for its heat resistance, and in the past was used on electric oven and hotplate wiring for its electrical insulation at elevated temperature, and in buildings for its flame-retardant and insulating properties, tensile strength, flexibility, and resistance to chemicals. The inhalation of some kinds of asbestos fibers, however, can cause a number of serious illnesses, including cancer. Many uses of asbestos are banned in many countries.


 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 16:33:46 by iko »
 

Offline JimBob

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6564
  • Thanked: 7 times
  • Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #408 on: 31/01/2007 01:57:58 »
The Forgotten X - (above)

Xeric - said of a habitat that is characterized by a low or inadequate supply of moisture. Also said of an organism or an assemblage of organisms existing in such an environment.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #409 on: 31/01/2007 03:24:55 »
Young, Thomas - A Poly math who dabbled in science and medicine and was chief figure in designing the rosetta stone.
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #410 on: 31/01/2007 09:59:05 »
Carnosic acid


Cooperative antitumor effects of vitamin D3 derivatives
and rosemary preparations in a mouse model of myeloid leukemia.

Sharabani H, Izumchenko E, Wang Q, Kreinin R, Steiner M, Barvish Z, Kafka M, Sharoni Y, Levy J, Uskokovic M, Studzinski GP, Danilenko M.
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D(3)) is a powerful differentiation agent, which has potential for treatment of myeloid leukemias and other types of cancer, but the calcemia produced by pharmacologically active doses precludes the use of this agent in the clinic. We have shown that carnosic acid, the major rosemary polyphenol, enhances the differentiating and antiproliferative effects of low concentrations of 1,25D(3) in human myeloid leukemia cell lines (HL60, U937). Here we translated these findings to in vivo conditions using a syngeneic mouse leukemia tumor model. To this end, we first demonstrated that as in HL60 cells, differentiation of WEHI-3B D(-) murine myelomonocytic leukemia cells induced by 1 nM 1,25D(3) or its low-calcemic analog, 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene-5,6-trans-cholecalciferol (Ro25-4020), can be synergistically potentiated by carnosic acid (10 microM) or the carnosic acid-rich ethanolic extract of rosemary leaves. This effect was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in G0 + G1 phase and a marked inhibition of cell growth. In the in vivo studies, i.p. injections of 2 microg Ro25-4020 in Balb/c mice bearing WEHI-3B D(-) tumors produced a significant delay in tumor appearance and reduction in tumor size, without significant toxicity. Another analog, 1,25-dihydroxy-16,23Z-diene-20-epi-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol (Ro26-3884) administered at the same dose was less effective than Ro25-4020 and profoundly toxic. Importantly, combined treatment with 1% dry rosemary extract (mixed with food) and 1 microg Ro25-4020 resulted in a strong cooperative antitumor effect, without inducing hypercalcemia. These results indicate for the first time that a plant polyphenolic preparation and a vitamin D derivative can cooperate not only in inducing leukemia cell differentiation in vitro, but also in the antileukemic activity in vivo. These data may suggest novel protocols for chemoprevention or differentiation therapy of myeloid leukemia. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 15;118(12):3012-21.


« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 16:38:33 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #411 on: 31/01/2007 15:33:49 »
Dendrochronology


Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating is the method of scientific dating based on the analysis of tree-ring growth patterns. This technique was invented and developed during the 20th century originally by A. E. Douglass, the founder of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. The technique can date wood to exact calendar years.


Overview

Many trees in temperate zones grow one growth ring each year, the newest ring being under the bark. For the entire period of a tree's life, a year-by-year record or ring pattern is formed that reflects the climatic conditions in which the tree grew. Adequate moisture and a long growing season result in a wide ring. A drought year may result in a very narrow one. Trees from the same region will tend to develop the same patterns of ring widths for a given period. These patterns can be compared and matched ring for ring with trees growing in the same geographical zone and under similar climatic conditions. Following these tree-ring patterns from living trees back through time, chronologies can be built up, both for entire regions, and for sub-regions of the world. Thus wood from ancient structures can be matched to known chronologies (a technique called cross-dating) and the age of the wood determined precisely. Cross-dating was originally done by visual inspection. Nowadays, computers are used to do the statistical matching.

To eliminate individual variations in tree ring growth, dendrochronologists take the smoothed average of the tree ring widths of multiple tree samples to build up a ring history. This process is termed replication. A tree ring history whose beginning and end dates are not known is called a floating chronology. It can be anchored by cross-matching either the beginning or the end section against the end sections of another chronology (tree ring history) whose dates are known. Fully anchored chronologies which extend back more than 10,000 years exist for river oak trees from South Germany (from the Main and Rhine rivers). A fully anchored chronology which extends back 8500 years exists for the bristlecone pine in the Southwest US (White Mountains of California).

In areas where the climate is reasonably predictable, trees develop annual rings of different properties depending on weather, rain, temperature, etc. in different years. These variations may be used to infer past climate variations —



 


Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #413 on: 31/01/2007 21:50:03 »
Faraday cage






A Faraday cage or Faraday shield is an enclosure formed by conducting material, or by a mesh of such material. Such an enclosure blocks out external static electrical fields. Faraday cages are named after physicist Michael Faraday, who built one in 1836 and explained its operation.

The electrical charges in the enclosing conductor repel each other and will therefore always reside on the outside surface of the cage. Any external static electrical field will cause the charges to rearrange so as to completely cancel the field's effects in the cage's interior. This effect is used for example to protect electronic equipment from lightning strikes and other electrostatic discharges.

To a large degree, Faraday cages also shield the interior from external electromagnetic radiation if the conductor is thick enough and its meshes, if present, are significantly smaller than the radiation's wavelength. This application of Faraday cages is explained under electromagnetic shielding.





Entrance to a Faraday room
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #414 on: 31/01/2007 22:08:52 »
Geiger counter





KIDDSofSPEED TOWN - Chernobyl Images   from:  http://www.kiddofspeed.com/chapter18.html
« Last Edit: 22/04/2007 09:40:39 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #415 on: 01/02/2007 04:35:18 »
Hydrogen peroxide
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #416 on: 01/02/2007 14:30:39 »
« Last Edit: 22/04/2007 09:49:29 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #417 on: 02/02/2007 16:56:03 »
Jacob,Mary Phelps

Inventor of the Bra:


The first modern brassiere to receive a patent was one invented by a New York socialite named Mary Phelps Jacob in 1913. Mary had just purchased a sheer evening gown for one of her social events. At that time, the only acceptable undergarment was a corset stiffened with whaleback bones. Mary found that the whalebones poked out visible around the plunging neckline and under the sheer fabric. Two silk handkerchiefs and some pink ribbon later, Mary had designed an alternative to the corset. The corset's reign was starting to topple.

An unhealthy and painful device designed to narrow an adult women's waist to 13, 12, 11 and even 10 or less inches, the corset is attributed to Catherine de Médicis, wife of King Henri II of France. She enforced a ban on thick waists at court attendance's (1550's) and started over 350 years of whalebones, steel rods and midriff torture.

Mary Phelps Jacob's new undergarment complimented the new fashions introduced at the time and demands from friends and family were high for the new brassiere. On November 3, 1914, a patent for the 'Backless Brassiere' issued. Caresse Crosby was the business name Jacob used for her brassiere production. Running a business was not enjoyable to Jacob and she soon sold the brassiere patent to the Warner Brothers Corset Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut, for $1,500. Warner (the bra-makers, not the movie-makers) made over fifteen million dollars from the bra patent over the next thirty years.

Mary Phelps Jacob was the first to patent an undergarment named 'Brassiere' derived from the old French word for 'upper arm'. Her patent was for a device that was lightweight, soft and separated the breasts naturally.

Other points in the history of the brassiere worth mentioning:

  # In 1875, manufacturers George Frost and George Phelps patented the 'Union Under-Flannel', a no bones, no eyelets, and no laces or pulleys under-outfit.
  # In 1893, a woman named Marie Tucek patented the 'breast supporter’; the device included separate pockets for the breasts and straps that went over the shoulder, fastened by hook-and-eye closures.
  # In 1889, corset-maker Herminie Cadolle invented the 'Well-Being' or 'Bien-être', a bra-like device sold as a health aid. The corset's support for the breasts squeezed up from below. Cadolle changed breast support to the shoulders down.
  # World War I dealt the corset a fatal blow when the U.S. War Industries Board called on women to stop buying corsets in 1917.  It freed up some 28,000 tons of metal!
  # In 1928, a Russian immigrant named Ida Rosenthal founded Maidenform. Ida was responsible for grouping women into bust-size categories (cup sizes).
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #418 on: 02/02/2007 17:46:58 »
Keratoachantoma



Case Report:

Spontaneous regression of keratoacanthoma
can be promoted by topical treatment with imiquimod cream

V. Di Lernia, C Ricci, G Albertini
Unità Operativa di Dermatologia, via Risorgimento 80, 42100 Reggio Emilia, Italy,

ABSTRACT
Imiquimod, the first member of a new class of immune response modifiers, is approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts. Recently, many clinical trials highlighted the potential of imiquimod as a treatment for other viral infections and cutaneous neoplasms. We report two cases of facial keratoacanthomas (KA) treated with topical 5% imiquimod cream. Patients were successfully cleared of KAs after treatment for 8 weeks.
No recurrence occurred after a 1-year follow-up. Despite the fact that KAs are characterized by the potential for spontaneous regression, it is possible that a faster activation of CD4+ lymphocytes, via interferon release and cytokine secretion takes place after imiquimod application leading to KA regression.

J.Eur.Acad.Dermatol.Venereol. 2004;18(5),626.


from:   http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2004.01025.x?cookieSet=1&journalCode=jdv


« Last Edit: 22/04/2007 09:49:59 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #419 on: 03/02/2007 02:40:12 »
Lilienfeld ,Julius Edgar


Julius Edgar Lilienfeld (1881 – 1963) was born in Lwow (German: Lemberg, Ukrainian: Lviv) in Austro-Hungarian occupied Poland and emigrated to the USA in 1927.

Among other things, he invented the transistor and the electrolytic capacitor in the 1920s. He filed several patents describing the construction and operation of transistors. Although the devices described in his patents should theoretically work, there is no evidence that they actually did. Despite that, the patents describe many features of modern transistors. When the inventors of the first practical transistor, Brattain, Bardeen and Shockley tried to get a patent on their device, most of their claims were rejected due to the Lilienfeld patents.

Some of his patents:

    * US1745175 (describing a device similar to a MESFET)
    * US1900018 (A thin film MOSFET.)
    * US1877140 (A solid state device where the current flow is controlled by a porous metal layer, a solid state version of the vacuum tube.)
    * US2013564 (The electrolytic capacitor)
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #420 on: 03/02/2007 02:59:53 »
Magnetic Therapy
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #421 on: 03/02/2007 22:14:07 »
Nystatin

Rachel Fuller Brown and Elizabeth Lee Hazen invented the worlds first useful antifungal antibiotic - nystatin.
   
 


As researchers for the New York Department of Health, Elizabeth Lee Hazen and Rachel Fuller Brown combined their efforts to develop the anti-fungal antibiotic drug nystatin. The drug, patented in 1957 was used to cure many disfiguring, disabling fungal infections as well as to balance the effect of many antibacterial drugs. In addition to human ailments, the drug has been used to treat such problems as Dutch Elm’s disease and to restore water-damaged artwork from the effects of mold.

The two scientists donated the royalties from their invention, over $13 million dollars, to the nonprofit Research Corporation for the advancement of academic scientific study. Elizabeth Lee Hazen and Rachel Fuller Brown were inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1994.
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #422 on: 03/02/2007 22:56:04 »
Obsessional neurosis = A psychoneurosis characterized by compulsive ideas or irresistible urges and often manifested in the ritualistic performance  of certain acts.
« Last Edit: 04/02/2007 00:06:05 by Karen W. »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #423 on: 04/02/2007 22:34:00 »
PAPERCLIP


The fastening of papers has been historical referenced to as early as the 13th century, when people put ribbon through parallel incisions in the upper left hand corner of pages. Later people started to wax the ribbons to make them stronger and easier to undo and redo. This was the way people clipped papers together for the next six hundred years.

In 1835, a New York physician named John Ireland Howe invented a machine for mass producing straight pins. Straight pins then became a popular way to fasten papers together, although they were not originally designed for that purpose. Straight pins were designed to be used in sewing and tailoring, to temporally fasten cloth together.

Johan Vaaler patentJohan Vaaler, a Norwegian inventor with a degree in electronics, science and mathematics, invented the paperclip in 1899. He received a patent for his design from Germany in 1899, since Norway had no patent laws at that time. Johan Vaaler was an employee at a local invention office when he invented the paperclip. He received an American patent in 1901 -- patent abstract  "It consists of forming same of a spring material, such as a piece of wire, that is bent to a rectangular, triangular, or otherwise shaped hoop, the end parts of which wire piece form members or tongues lying side by side in contrary directions." Johan Vaaler was the first person to patent a paperclip design, although other unpatented designs might have existed first.

American inventor, Cornelius J. Brosnan filed for an American patent for a paperclip in 1900. He called his invention the "Konaclip".

William Middlebrook patented a machine for making Gem paper clipsBut it was a company called the Gem Manufacturing Ltd. of England who first designed the double oval shaped standard looking paperclip. This familiar and famous paperclip, was and still is referred to as the "Gem" clip. William Middlebrook, of Waterbury, Connecticut, patented a machine for making paper clips of the Gem design in 1899. The Gem paperclip was never patented.

People have been re-inventing the paperclip over and over again. The designs that have been the most successful are the "Gem" with it's double oval shape, the "Non-Skid" which held in place well, the "Ideal" used for thick wads of paper, and the "Owl" the paperclip that did not get tangled up with other paperclips.

note: During World War II, Norwegians were prohibited from wearing any buttons with the likeness or initials of their king on them. In protest they started wearing paperclips, because paperclips were a Norwegian invention whose original function was to bind together. This was a protest against the Nazi occupation and wearing a paperclip could have gotten you arrested.










patent drawings from USPTO
photo: www.freeimages.co.uk
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #424 on: 05/02/2007 18:15:22 »
Q)uinghaosu  (Artemisinin)



Annual erect plant up to 2m tall. Leaves 2-3 pinnatisect or decompound, serrate or lobulate. Inflorescence panicle (compound raceme) with capitulum. The capitula are inoonspicuous hemispherical, pendulous. Achenes surface has longitudinal striations and lack pappus. Parts used : Aerial parts /Artemisinin Major constituents : One of the economically important constituents of the plant is the sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin. The other main constituents are artemisitene, arteannuin B and artemisinic acid.
Uses : The compound artemisinin has been found to be effective for the treatment of chloroquin resistant malaria and cerebral malaria.
Two semi-synthetic derivatives of artemisinin namely arteehter and artesunate have been found to be more effective than artemisinin in the clinical trails. The palnt yield essential oil after st4am distillation of fresh herbage which is widely used in pharmaceutical, cosmetics and flavouring industries.

from:     http://presidentofindia.nic.in/herbal.html




Artemisinin: Malaria's Magic Bullet?


"Years of vaccine research have produced few hopeful candidates and although scientists are redoubling the search, an effective vaccine is at best years away. Science still has no magic bullet for malaria and many doubt that such a single solution will ever exist."

- Statistics Division of the United Nations (January, 2002)


...In May 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) gave the thumbs up to the miracle drug of malaria, Artemisinin. This Chinese herbal remedy has been recognized as a 97% effective in curing Falciparum malaria and is now due to be distributed globally, especially to Africa where one child dies from malaria every 30 seconds.
Apparently reacting to a conclusive report in the medical magazine, The Lancet the WHO (in co-ordination with the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria) authorized the purchase and distribution of one million doses of Artemisinin and the cancellation of orders for other ineffective medications.

The Killer
Alongside tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS, malaria is the most deadly disease on the planet with over 300 million persons directly infected every year. Although over 70% of deaths occur in Africa alone, almost half of the world's population lives in tropical or sub-tropical regions and is therefore at risk.
...

4further reading, click here:   http://www.cpamedia.com/history/malaria_miracle_drug/


« Last Edit: 22/04/2007 09:50:50 by iko »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #424 on: 05/02/2007 18:15:22 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums