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Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 449500 times)

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #450 on: 08/02/2007 19:20:04 »
QWERTY


QWERTY (pronounced /ˈkwərti/) is the most common modern-day keyboard layout on English-language computer and typewriter keyboards. It takes its name from the first six letters seen in the keyboard's top first row of letters. The QWERTY design was patented by Christopher Sholes in 1868 and sold to Remington in 1873, when it first appeared in typewriters.





« Last Edit: 08/02/2007 19:22:22 by neilep »
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #452 on: 08/02/2007 19:36:32 »
Satellite


(astronautics)
A spacecraft orbiting the Earth or other heavenly body. The first artificial satellite was Sputnik 1, launched by the USSR on 4 October 1957, and there are now more than 3000 satellites orbiting the Earth for remote sensing, military surveillance, communications, and space astronomy. Geostationary satellites orbit at 35 900 km/22 300 mi above Earth, taking 24 hours to orbit, so they appear in almost the same part of our sky at all times. They are important for communications, especially satellite television, since fixed dishes can be used at ground stations.
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #453 on: 08/02/2007 20:21:46 »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #454 on: 12/02/2007 00:15:12 »
Umbilical cord


In placental mammals, the umbilical cord is a tube that connects a developing embryo or fetus to its placenta. It normally contains three vessels, two arteries and one vein, buried within Wharton's jelly, for the exchange of nutrient- and oxygen-rich blood between the embryo and placenta. The presence of only two vessels in the cord is sometimes related to abnormalities in the fetus, but may occur without accompanying abnormalities.





A newborn with umbilical
 cord still attached (3 minutes.)
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #455 on: 12/02/2007 00:24:52 »
Viagra
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #456 on: 12/02/2007 04:35:17 »
Watch







A watch is a small portable timepiece or clock that displays the time and sometimes the day, date, month and year. In past centuries, these often took the form of pocket watches, which today are seldom carried or worn. In modern usage, watch is usually a contraction of wristwatch, a designation for the most popular style of timekeeping device worn on the wrist.

Because most watches lack a striking mechanism, such as a bell or gong to announce the passage of time, they are properly designated as timepieces, rather than clocks.


Today, the most common type of watch is the wristwatch, worn on the wrist and fastened with a watch strap or watchband, a bracelet made of real or synthetic leather, metal, nylon, or even ceramic. Before the inexpensive miniaturization that became possible in the 20th century, most watches were pocket watches, which had covers and were carried separately, often in a pocket and attached to a watch chain or fob.

Most inexpensive and medium-priced watches used mainly for timekeeping are electronic watches with quartz movements, powered by electricity. Expensive, collectible watches valued more for their workmanship and aesthetic appeal than for simple timekeeping often have purely mechanical movements and are powered by springs, even though mechanical movements are many times less accurate than quartz movements. The most accurate watches have radio-controlled movements that are miniaturized, portable versions of radio clocks (q.v.).



A wrist watch.....Like you really needed me to tell you that !!!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #457 on: 12/02/2007 06:12:01 »
Xylophone= A musical percusion instument consisting of a series of wooden bars graduated in length so as to sound the notes of the scale when struck with a small wooden hammer.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #458 on: 12/02/2007 18:29:46 »
Yo-yo


A yo-yo is a toy consisting of two equally sized and weighted discs of plastic, wood, or metal, connected with an axle, around which string is wound. There is a slip knot at the free end of the string, and, on a properly strung yo-yo, an uncut loop around the axle (known as a looped slip-string) which allows it to spin freely, or "sleep" upon reaching the string's end.

It is played by tying the string's free end around the middle finger, grasping the yo-yo, and then throwing it downwards with a smooth motion. As the axle spins within the loop, a gyroscopic effect occurs, stabilizing the yo-yo on its axis and permitting time to perform a number of movements. By flicking the wrist, the yo-yo can be made to return to the player's hand, with the cord again completely wound into the groove. Generally, any movement or combination of movements which result in the return of the yo-yo to the player's hand in this fashion is considered a trick, although this is not an absolute standard.

Yo-yoing is a popular pastime around the world. Although generally associated with children, it is not uncommon for people who gain a level of proficiency at the sport in youth to continue playing into adulthood. A yo-yo player is referred to as a yo-yoer (most common), yoist, thrower, or simply as a player.


There is no conclusive documented evidence that the yo-yo is derived from, nor even existed in any form intended for use as a weapon. Generating enough force to create a fatal blow with a yo-yo would also be difficult due to the fact that as the toy is reaching the end of the string it is slowing down. This rumour was possibly started by Tom Ives, Duncan's PR man in the 1930's. There is speculation that he created the weapon myth during the 1930's fad for the publicity. Another origin may have been stories of hunters in the Philippines in the 16th century using sharp rocks with strings attached to kill prey from trees. The development of the modern yo-yo began in the Philippines at around this time, which is probably the source of the confusion.





Do I really need to label this picture ?...Yo do know what they are don't yo ?
« Last Edit: 12/02/2007 18:32:12 by neilep »
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #459 on: 12/02/2007 19:07:46 »
Zebra fish   (Brachydanio rerio)


Photo by Phil Jones/Medical College Of Georgia
Published in the August 2003 issue of "Popular Mechanics"


Zebra Fish Aid Deaf

Transparent zebra fish may hold the clue to restoring hearing for humans who have lost the hair cells that stimulate nerves in their auditory system.
Birth defects, disease and some drugs can trigger the loss of the hair on these specialized cells.

In zebra fish, which rely on a similar cell arrangement for balance, hair cells regenerate  [O8)]  if lost, says David J. Kozlowski, a geneticist at the Medical College of Georgia.
He hopes to identify the genes that spur regeneration in zebra fish. Replacing or reactivating hair-growth genes could make it possible to correct hearing loss and balance disorders in humans.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/industry/1287511.html



« Last Edit: 12/02/2007 19:16:26 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #460 on: 12/02/2007 20:32:39 »
Airbag



An airbag, also known as a Supplementary/Secondary Restraint System (SRS), an Air Cushion Restraint System (ACRS), or the Supplemental Inflatable Restraint (SIR) is a flexible membrane or envelope, inflatable to contain air or some other gas. Air bags are most commonly used for cushioning, in particular after very rapid inflation in the case of an automobile collision.



An automobile airbag, like this one
 in a crashed SEAT Ibiza car, an
airbag inflates and deflates within
 a fraction of a second (about 0.8 seconds)
.



Since the start of 1994, Ford made
airbags standard across their entire
 range of cars sold in Europe (except
for the Maverick which was outsourced
from Nissan).


« Last Edit: 12/02/2007 20:36:35 by neilep »
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #461 on: 12/02/2007 21:54:58 »
Barbus tetrazona
     (Sumatrabarbe)



from Dr. Reinald Hillebrand homepage:    http://www1.mpi-halle.mpg.de/~hi/

         MAX-PLANCK-INSTITUT FÜR MIKROSTRUKTURPHYSIK   
« Last Edit: 12/02/2007 22:03:10 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #462 on: 12/02/2007 22:31:46 »
Carl Sagan

totally captivating, listening to him is an experience

His wikipedia entry can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Sagan
« Last Edit: 12/02/2007 22:38:38 by paul.fr »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #463 on: 12/02/2007 22:42:31 »
Dialysis


In medicine, dialysis is a type of renal replacement therapy which is used to provide an artificial replacement for lost kidney function due to renal failure. It is a life support treatment and does not treat any kidney diseases. Dialysis may be used for very sick patients who have suddenly lost their kidney function (acute renal failure) or for quite stable patients who have permanently lost their kidney function (end stage renal failure). When healthy, the kidneys remove waste products (for example potassium, acid and urea) from the blood and also remove excess fluid in the form of urine. Dialysis treatments have to duplicate both of these functions as dialysis (waste removal) and ultrafiltration (fluid removal).
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #464 on: 13/02/2007 07:33:35 »
Electrolyte
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #465 on: 13/02/2007 17:00:47 »
Forensic science

Forensic science (often shortened to forensics) is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. This may be in relation to a crime or to a civil action. The use of the term "forensics" in place of "forensic science" could be considered incorrect; the term "forensic" is effectively a synonym for "legal" or "related to courts" (from Latin, it means "before the forum"). However, it is now so closely associated with the scientific field that many dictionaries include the meaning that equates the word "forensics" with "forensic science."

“Forensic” comes from the Latin word “forensis” meaning forum. During the time of the Romans, a criminal charge meant presenting the case before a group of public individuals. Both the person accused of the crime and the accuser would give speeches based on their side of the story. The individual with the best argumentation and delivery would determine the outcome of the case. In other words, the person with the best forensis skills would win.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #466 on: 13/02/2007 17:51:31 »
Google,

(I mean the whole system setup)









« Last Edit: 13/02/2007 18:00:29 by Karen W. »
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #467 on: 13/02/2007 18:11:40 »
Huntington chorea


Huntington disease

Background: Huntington disease (HD), also known as Huntington chorea (HC), is an inherited disease characterized by choreiform movements and progressive dementia.
In adults, HD most often causes involuntary movements, but rigidity can also be a feature of the disease.
The initial diagnosis is rarely established in the emergency department, but patients with established disease may present to the ED because of worsening symptoms.

Pathophysiology: HD is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance. An HD gene has been identified with an abnormal protein product (huntingtin) that can be identified in the brain. The link between this protein and the selective loss of neuronal groups in the CNS remains to be established. HD has now been identified genetically as a trinucleotide CAG-repeat mutation on chromosome 4. The CAG repeat length may be important in determining the age of onset and the rate of disease progression.

Frequency:
In the US: Prevalence of HD in the United States is 5.15 cases per 100,000 persons.
Internationally: HD is encountered throughout the world; however, localized geographic clusters of disease exist. Countries that have been settled by western Europeans have an incidence of the disease similar to the incidence in the United States.
Mortality/Morbidity: HD is a progressive neurological disorder usually leading to death 15-20 years after onset of neurological or psychological impairment.

Race: HD is found in all ethnic groups.
Sex: Males and females are diagnosed in equal numbers.
Age:
Symptoms arising from a typical presentation of HD usually do not develop until a person is aged 35 years or older. By the time of diagnosis, many patients already have had children and have passed the gene to another generation.
As many as 10% of patients with HD have a juvenile form of the disease in which the onset of symptoms may occur when the patient is younger than 20 years.
Muscular rigidity is more common with juvenile-onset illness.
...


read more clicking here:    http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic254.htm
...less 'medical' language here:    http://www.answers.com/topic/huntington-s-disease
« Last Edit: 13/02/2007 18:27:46 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #468 on: 14/02/2007 00:12:45 »
Intravenous Catheter

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity duct or vessel. Catheters thereby allow drainage or injection of fluids or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses a catheter is a thin, flexible tube: a "soft" catheter; in some uses, it is a larger, solid tube: a "hard" catheter.

The ancient Egyptians are reported to have fashioned catheters from papyrus, and the ancient Greeks from reeds. A flexible urinary catheter was invented by Benjamin Franklin for use by his brother.

Placement of a catheter into a particular part of the body may allow:

    * draining urine from the urinary bladder as in urinary catheterization, e.g., the Foley catheter or even when the urethra is damaged as in suprapubic catheterisation.
    * drainage of fluid collections, e.g. an abdominal abscess
    * administration of intravenous fluids, medication or parenteral nutrition
    * angioplasty, angiography, balloon septostomy, balloon sinuplasty
    * direct measurement of blood pressure in an artery or vein
    * direct measurement of intracranial pressure
    * administration of anaesthetic medication into the epidural space, the subarachnoid space, or around a major nerve bundle such as the brachial plexus

A central venous catheter is a conduit for giving drugs or fluids into a large-bore catheter positioned either in a vein near the heart or just inside the atrium. A Swan-Ganz catheter is a special type of catheter placed into the pulmonary artery for measuring pressures in the heart.
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 14/02/2007 18:40:52 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #470 on: 15/02/2007 03:46:31 »
Kevlar








Kevlar is the DuPont Company's brand name for the particularly light but very strong synthetic fibre. Created in DuPont's labs in 1965 by Stephanie Kwolek, Herbert Blades, and Phil Thier, Kevlar was first used commercially in the early 1970s. It can be spun into ropes or sheets of fabric that can either be used as-is, or used in the construction of composite components. Kevlar is now used in a wide range of applications, from bicycles to body armor, due to its high strength-to-weight ratio (see Tensile strength), "...5 times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis...".[1] It is a member of the Aramid family of synthetic fibres and similar to Twaron from Teijin.



Chemical structure of Kevlar. Bold: monomer unit; dashed: hydrogen bonds.



Properties


When Kevlar is spun in the same way that a spider spins a web, the resulting fiber has tremendous strength, and is heat- and cut-resistant. The fibers do not rust or corrode. When woven together, they form a good material for mooring lines and other underwater objects.

There are three common grades of Kevlar: Kevlar, Kevlar 29, and Kevlar 49. Kevlar is typically used as reinforcements in tires and other rubber mechanical goods. Kevlar 29 is used in industrial applications such as cables, asbestos replacement, brake linings, and body armor. Kevlar 49 is considered to have the greatest tensile strength of all the aramids, and is used in applications such as plastic reinforcement for boat hulls, airplanes, and bikes.

Kevlar is susceptible to breakdown from ultraviolet light (such as sunlight) and hence is almost never used unprotected or unsheathed.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #471 on: 15/02/2007 04:34:01 »
Love

Has nothing to do with science but it is St. Valentine's day in the US

 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #472 on: 15/02/2007 05:27:29 »
 Migraines
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #473 on: 15/02/2007 15:07:44 »
Nano



- is a prefix (symbol n) in the SI system of units denoting a factor of 10−9. It is often used in prefixing time and length units encountered in electronics and computer systems, like 30 nanoseconds (symbol ns) and 100 nanometres (nm). It was confirmed in 1960 and comes from the Greek νᾶνος, meaning dwarf.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #474 on: 15/02/2007 16:29:21 »
Ovule = A small egg or seed,especially one in a early stage of development.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #474 on: 15/02/2007 16:29:21 »

 

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